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Old May 25th, 2006, 06:41 AM
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Default Practical Preps

This might be a useful place to discuss any kine preps...hurricane, poverty, pandemic, whatevah.

So, I'll begin with the basics....food, water, and shelter.

Think of your shelter. Are you a homeowner, do you rent, live with room-mates, in a tent at the beach? Have you got a mortgage or monthly rent? Long or short term lease? What about bills? Could you survive if there was a problem, where you are, now? Could you fit in others, if you had to?

Think of your water situation. What would happen, if there was no town water? Are you on catchment, or stored water? Where could you get enough water for your daily needs, if the water supply was cut off? How can you store water? How much water does a person need, every day, for drinking, cooking, washing, and cleaning?

And den, food. How much food do you have on hand, right now? How many meals can you make, for how many people? What about the cooking fuel? Dishwashing liquid? How could you cook, if there was no electricity or gas? What about the food pyramid...spam and tuna are all very well, but what about milk and fruit and vegetables? Condiments, oil, eggs, cheese...what would happen if you had no fridge? No supermarket? No restaurant?
  #2  
Old May 25th, 2006, 11:23 AM
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Default Re: Practical Preps

I was trying to figure out about how to feed my four kids, and myself, during a period of 'social distancing' that might last up to 18 months, during a pandemic situation. Wholesome, regular, balanced meals, with not too much dependance on water or cooking fule...or too many ono cooking smells (in case of starving/looting neighbors.

I already get plenty kine canned stuffs, meat, vegetables, fruits, an all...but there are some things that don't come in cans, or are too $$$ (no Euro sign, on my machine), or too junk tasting, if they do. Like carrots, potatoes, celery, onions, cabbage, for instance. Good for you, good for soup, but hard for store fresh, for such a long period of time.

So...I bought a dehydrator. This is a nifty machine. It's has an elecrtic base, and a fan, that pushes the hot air up, through multiple trays of prepared food. I'd already been drying apples, for years, on my woodburning stove, so I had some practice...and boy, those apples are good!

No sweat, I've just finished drying what might be the biggest soup in the world...200kg of potatoes, 140 of carrots, armfuls of celery, 20 heads of cabbage, a field full of leeks, and 17 5kg bags of onions...to name some. nd bags and bags of already-cooked pinto and kidney beans...just soak em for ten minutes in hot water, add some spice, top with onion and cheese, and, voila!.. refried beans!

Fruit leather is easy, too...applesauce, mashed strawberries, kiwis, fruit cocktail...any kine. I made some prune mui leather, too...soaked and stoned prunes, kiwis, dried apricots, dried orange slices (no get lemon peel, over here), chinese five-spice, and that WONDERFUL li hing mui powder...no had dat, when I was in da aina. Just spread it out, onto saranwrap, and let it dry...in a few hours, i's ready to go.

Storage is easy, too...dehydrated stuff is light and compact...jess gotta make sure that it's all the way dry, and then store airtight. Maybe in Hawaii's climate (for those of you who are there), a foodsaver vacuum packaging machine would be a good idea....just an idea, mind...I not telling you what for do.

Meat dries very well. I fry hamburger, and then dry it...turns out like hamburger gravel, and re-hydrates like a charm, for spaghetti, lasagna, chili, whatever...my kids love it, just dry, on buttered bread. Turkey and pork get the same treatment...but they don't get ground, just cut up in small dice....and then used for pies, stir fry, curry, whatevers.

Fish, too, works with excellent results. I dry it raw, just like jerky, and then use it for soups, sandwiches, casseroles. I have some dries salmon, and I'm wondering if it'll be ono, as lomi salmon, as I haven't tried it out, yet.

The machine is not cheap, and there are several different models on the market. Models for the handyman to build are available, too. I have a smaller, tabletop model. Had I known, I would've bought the biggest one available, cause it seems that I am forever filling, preparing to fill, empying, rotating....

But what a harvest! My shelves runneth over! Anytime I need anything for cooking, there it is, already prepared, for me. And, shuld the 'impossible' happen, food for my family will be the least of my problems.
  #3  
Old May 26th, 2006, 08:03 AM
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Default Re: Practical Preps

For those of you wondering about starch, during 'social distancing, here are a few ideas.

Rice, of course, which stores well, and is cheap to stock up on. Don't forget to think of cooking fuel, and dishsoap, sponges, and water, and matches.

Plan to not count on electricity being a given. In a quarantine situation, many people won't be going in to work, from sickness, or fear of sickness, or to take care of those, who are sick, at home. There may not be any gas stations available, either. This counts for the good people that operate the electrical power, wherever you live. Of course, there are those 'off grid', on the Big Isle....with generators, solar, battery, 12 volt, etc...no forget da fuel.

Pasta, too. It goes so well with anything...no forget da 'anything'. Now might be a good time to try out pasta recipes that need few other ingredients, or ingredients that can be stored in your prep pantry. Think about the fats, that go so ell with pasta...olive oil, cheese, butter...some of these can be bought and stored, or even home-canned. Maybe some basil or parsley seeds, or a fw cloves of garlc to sprout...only a windowill is needed, and it'll add to the pleasure of the finished dish. Think 'water' for cooking the stuff.

Semoule. Or couscous. Or semolina. Or cream of wheat. This stuff fluffs up really nicely,with just a little hot water (think water, fuel). It can be used as a replacement for rice, or mixed woth vegetables, mint, and a vinaigrette, for a nice taboule salad, or even mixed with oranges they dry so well, in the dehydrator), cinnamon sugar, and nuts, for a morning cereal or a dessert.

Bread. The staff of life. Much more so, where I live, than in Hawaii...but, still, an important part of the daily food intake. How, might ou ask, are we to have a good supply of bread handy, during quarantine?

Ahhh....there's crackers and zwieback, for a start. Breadcrumbs, too, which can be used with a can of salmon, for patties, or with milk and egg (powdered), in a pudding. Pancakes, waffles, crepes, and their friends...mixes might be the easiest to store, but 'scratch' ones are easy enough. Home-made bread is not so difficult...maybe better for practice now, before any pandemic situation...no forget da yeast, sugar, flour, salt, cooking fuel, and water wid soap, for clean up da mess....

An no forget da neighbors...you no going like em smelling dat home-made bread smell, an coming over for grind...or for kill you, an den grind. Get real, a pandemic would cause lots of 'collateral damage'.

Try dis: DRIED BREAD.
Das what I do. I buy da stuff cheap, as day-old, unsellable, and then dry it, and store it. My bread usually comes as baguettes, so I chop and slice, and cube, and crumb. Sometimes I almst slice it through, and prepare it like for garlic bread...yum..all I gotta do is to steam it a little, then top it with (home canned) butter, and garlic and herbs, and into the oven it goes...no forget foil. Dried bread slices are not a luxury food, I'll admit, but in a situation where there is no food at all, It's pretty good. No forget jars of jam, nutella, peanut butter, honey, butter, meat spreads (paté), mayonnaise and tuna, li'dat.

In my next post, I'll be giving you some ideas of all of the wonderful and interesting recipes and uses for dried bread.

Until then, keep on preppin'!
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Old May 26th, 2006, 08:05 PM
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Default Re: Practical Preps

A couple cases of cup noodle. Already get dried vegies insai.
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Old May 26th, 2006, 09:27 PM
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Default Re: Practical Preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by Da Rolling Eye
A couple cases of cup noodle. Already get dried vegies insai.
You might get bored, wid jess dat.
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Old May 26th, 2006, 11:44 PM
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Default Re: Practical Preps

That's where you alternate between the tuna, spam, cup of noodles and whatever one happens to stockpile.
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Old May 27th, 2006, 02:48 AM
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Default Re: Practical Preps

You guys ares lucky....you GET Spam and Pot Noodles. And canned ham and corned beef. For meat-kine stuff, over here, we not get dat. In my store, I get tuna, salmon, sardines, canned hotdogs, mackerel, paté (meat paste), home-dried hambuger, pork, fish, and turkey, and the French speciality, made from force-fed ducks...foiegras, confit, and confit gizzards and sausages.

I can stuff, too. I tried canned laulau...with some variation..due to regional products...pork, chicken, force-fed duck, salmon, and with spinach, and wrapped in grape leaves. Hey, when you want the taste of home, you substitute, if no can get da 'real thing'!

An you guys so lucky....you can get saimin base, too. Does anyone have a homemade recipe for that? Or one for fishcake? Or wonton wrappers? Or tofu? Or cones, for cone sushi? All da stuff I miss, and no can get, over here.
  #8  
Old May 27th, 2006, 04:15 AM
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Default Re: Practical Preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by SusieMisajon
Hey, when you want the taste of home, you substitute, if no can get da 'real thing'!
But if you 'substitute' and use stuff like grape leaves, then it not gonna taste like 'da real thing' at all...

Last edited by Palolo Joe; May 27th, 2006 at 04:28 AM.
  #9  
Old May 27th, 2006, 07:20 AM
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Default Re: Practical Preps

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Originally Posted by Palolo Joe
But if you 'substitute' and use stuff like grape leaves, then it not gonna taste like 'da real thing' at all...
You'd be surprised.
  #10  
Old May 29th, 2006, 01:00 AM
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Default Toilet preps

First of all, there's the obvious...toilet paper. Have you an idea of how much you use, in a week? A month? A year? A possible "18 months" pandemic...and after-pandemic shortages?

There ARE alternatives...sear's catalogues (do they still exist?), newspapers, washable rags (IF you have a water supply), leaves, sand...or plain water and your left hand.

When planning TP preps, consider storage space and availability of your chosen material. And disposability...if there's no water supply, there'll not be much flushing.

Ordinary toilet paper is cheap, available, and light. Buy some, now, and your only problem will be how to store the stuff.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 01:04 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

I am curious why 18 months?

In any event Sears doesn't sells catalogs anymore. Been a while since I got a JC Penny's catalog in the mail.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 01:32 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

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Originally Posted by helen
I am curious why 18 months?

In any event Sears doesn't sells catalogs anymore. Been a while since I got a JC Penny's catalog in the mail.
The 18 months goes back to the last great pandemic, the Spanish Flu. As far as they can tell, that flu came in three major 'waves' during an 18 month period.

It seems that, even if you got sick, and survived, the first wave, that didn't make you immune for the other two. What we know, today, about viruses, means that, probably, the flu virus mutated, between waves. Hence, no immunity.

There's not much to be hoped for, that the next pandemic won't behave differently then the last one.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 01:50 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Was Hawaii cutoff from outside contact for 18 months back in 1918?

I grant you if such a situation were to happen I can understand life would be tough but the flow of goods to Hawaii would continue. There will shortages yes but a total cutoff, I don't think so.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 02:11 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Next, let's have a look at toilets...or the lack of.

Toilets are something that we don't even really think about, unless they're not in working order. Who stays awake, at night, wondering about toilets? Who would even consider a house, without them...the Big Island Fern Forest doesn't count, they all have outhouses or composting waterless ones.

Not many people even know how the thing works, or where the stuff goes, once it's flushed. All you need to know about toilets is: Put the seat back down. Clean the 'skid marks'. Decide on the household preference for putting the paper so that the rolls comes from under, or over.

Right?

Not so fast......suppose that the water didn't work? Or that the toilet was not able to flush down the stuff? Or that you were stuck somewhere where there wasn't a toilet?

Never fear...there ARE options.

The hippies' composting toilet, for a start. No sweat, just throw in some peat moss or sawdust, after each use, turn the rotating drum, and wait a few months for the compost to be finished, then take it, from the little drawer underneath, and spread it on the garden. Of course, you must have a power source for a heat or lamp thingy, inside the composter, to help speed up the drying time...too much shishi makes it a soggy mess. Or leave the composter for number 2, and go shishi outside.

If the thing flushes, and the only problem is a lack of water...you may want to think of using recycled 'gray water', saved from showers, laundry, dishes, whatever. Of course, you'll have to think ahead, and put water into storage, and have gray water storage containers ready. Then you get to stay up, at night, and think of water cycles...first shower in it, save, then do laundry in it, save, then flush with it, gone forever (that in itself, is a whole nuther thread).

And you don't have to flush every time, either. Once a day? Once a week?When it's full? Maybe think to put the used toilet paper into a separate container. (I know, I know...this is a yucky discussion, and anyway, it'll never happen, here)

Camping toilets are real good. We have something called a 'Campa-Potty', looks almost like a 'real' toilet. When it's full, all you gotta do is take off the seat, take it to a 'real' toilet, turn the valve, open it (pee-you stinky!), and dump it into the nearest ordinary toilet. The stuff tuns into a sort of liquid slurry...just dump it all into an ordinary toilet at once....lots of 'goes', for just one flush. Rinse, close the valve, clip the seat back on, and begin, again.

There's also the old 'chamber pot' method. One bucket, with lid, a bit of water at the bottom, and Bob's your uncle. Better, even, is to line the bucket with a double layer of plastic, heavy duty bags, and throw in some cat litter, sawdust, or peatmoss, after each use. Of course, you'll have to something with those full bags...

If you really can't stand the idea of not pooping into anything, except for a 'real' toilet....the Red Cross has a soluton for you. Treat your old friend like the bucket, above. Line the waterless bowl with double bags, and use it like that. Of course, you STILL have to do something with the full bags, and the bucket system has a tight-fitting lid, where the toilet doesn't...you choose. Just don't forget to stock catlitter, sawdust, or peatmoss, either way.

The old stand-by, the outhouse, will work. Stock some lime, or sawdust, catlitter, etc....

Just 'going' anywhere will work, too. but it's yucky. And it only counts IF you can get outside. Try, at least, to bury it.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 02:24 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by helen
Was Hawaii cutoff from outside contact for 18 months back in 1918?

I grant you if such a situation were to happen I can understand life would be tough but the flow of goods to Hawaii would continue. There will shortages yes but a total cutoff, I don't think so.
I don't know, either. Even the government says that each community will be on its' own.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 02:26 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

And it seems that your hints make the assumation that one is living in a rural area, where it's not a problem to dig up your own yard to either stockpile your stuff or make a hole to store the waste.

However if you live in an urban setting and in a highrise, there is really no way to dig holes in an non-existant yard.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 02:33 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by SusieMisajon
[...]Ordinary toilet paper is cheap, available, and light. Buy some, now, and your only problem will be how to store the stuff.
And therein lies the problem. Exactly how does one stock up, be it TP, food or otherwise, for 18 months when one lives in 400 sq. ft. with no extraneous, on site storage, no garage and no storage facility closer than 25 minutes away...without turning the place into a small Hasegawa's General Store? Inquiring minds wanna know. Really.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 02:45 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by helen
And it seems that your hints make the assumation that one is living in a rural area, where it's not a problem to dig up your own yard to either stockpile your stuff or make a hole to store the waste.

However if you live in an urban setting and in a highrise, there is really no way to dig holes in an non-existant yard.
That's the problem...and many people don't live anywhere other than in high-rises. It's a difficult thing to plan for, especially if water can't be counted on. The solution for my own family is the Campa-Potty, and lots and lots of water containers.

There is, of course, the real old-fashioned way....just chucking it out the window.
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Old May 29th, 2006, 02:58 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by tutusue
And therein lies the problem. Exactly how does one stock up, be it TP, food or otherwise, for 18 months when one lives in 400 sq. ft. with no extraneous, on site storage, no garage and no storage facility closer than 25 minutes away...without turning the place into a small Hasegawa's General Store? Inquiring minds wanna know. Really.
Not to mention the $$$ of stocking up. And time. And energy.

Tha's a hard one. Lemme make a start....under the bed, behind the couch, on the books behind the books or instead of the books, on top of the bed (think canopy), against the wall, under the table, on the floor, hung from the ceiling and the walls, in concentrated form, in the closet, in the cupboards, in the car, instead of furniture, stacked up high, put the kids in one room, and use the other one, sleep on the couch, and use the bedroom, move to a bigger place, do without stuff, under the table, instead of the table, in the tub, on the lanai....

It IS horrible...and that's just the preps. My own kids think I'm lolo, and don't want to know. My house DOES look like the old Waialua Store. I'm becoming a recluse...I let NOBODY upstairs, where most of the preps are. I lie. I had a chimney stovepipe fire, recently, and refused to let the firemen upstairs...they had to get a ladder, and go up from the outside. Boy, were they MAD at me....buy, hey, NO WAY were they seeing my stock!

Okay...maybe I stay a bit lolo...but rather lolo, than right. I tell the kids, If BF doesn't come, they can tease me forever...das okay wid me!
  #20  
Old May 29th, 2006, 02:59 AM
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Default Re: Susie's Practical Preps

The last threat of a dock strike a few years ago (which got settled before anyone went on strike) I picked up a package of bulk toilet paper which lasted a few months (according to what I posted back then that bulk pack of 36 rolls lasted 3-1/2 months). I sort of remember it was a slight issue for me to store that many rolls in my place.
  #21  
Old May 29th, 2006, 03:03 AM
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Default Re: Susie's Practical Preps

Maybe just starting somewhere, anywhere, no matter how small, is a start.

The thing is, being that the government says they won't be around, to help...the more people prep, and practice being self-sufficient, the less hungry, panicked, and looting there will be.

Anywhere is a start...cause if you're sick, or afraid to get that way, or stuck indoors during 'social distancing'....if you've got food and water and some basics, you can 'hunker down', and try to keep out of harms' way.
  #22  
Old May 29th, 2006, 03:07 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by SusieMisajon
That's the problem...and many people don't live anywhere other than in high-rises. It's a difficult thing to plan for, especially if water can't be counted on. The solution for my own family is the Campa-Potty, and lots and lots of water containers.
Tell you what you do what's important for you, we do what's important for us.

Quote:
There is, of course, the real old-fashioned way....just chucking it out the window.
I was going to ask what's your background. Like are you a doctor, or health care professional? Did a stint on Civil Defense or some other disaster relief type of planning? But this last comment of yours is really not practical.
  #23  
Old May 29th, 2006, 03:08 AM
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Default Re: Susie's Practical Preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by helen
The last threat of a dock strike a few years ago (which got settled before anyone went on strike) I picked up a package of bulk toilet paper which lasted a few months (according to what I posted back then that bulk pack of 36 rolls lasted 3-1/2 months). I sort of remember it was a slight issue for me to store that many rolls in my place.
The wholed damned thing is unimaginable.

Especially in today's world, with it's 'just in time' delivery system.

But I trust the WHO, the UN's World Health Orginization...and they're very concerned. After all, this wouldn't be the first time, that something such as this has passed through. It's just the first time that humans have been so used to supermarkets and modern conveniences.
  #24  
Old May 29th, 2006, 04:12 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by helen
Tell you what you do what's important for you, we do what's important for us.




I was going to ask what's your background. Like are you a doctor, or health care professional? Did a stint on Civil Defense or some other disaster relief type of planning? But this last comment of yours is really not practical.
That's true, but when you remember the mess that was Katrina.....

My background? I'm a Mom.

The whole idea of this thread is for everyone to think about and discuss options before, rather than during.
  #25  
Old May 29th, 2006, 05:10 AM
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Default Re: Toilet preps

Quote:
Originally Posted by helen
Was Hawaii cutoff from outside contact for 18 months back in 1918?

I grant you if such a situation were to happen I can understand life would be tough but the flow of goods to Hawaii would continue. There will shortages yes but a total cutoff, I don't think so.
During the pandemic of the Spanish Flu, nobody realized what was happening, for the most part. It was called the 'Spanish' flu, because Spain was about the only country without a news blackout, all others had blocked news, due to WW1, which was happening, at the time.

In the US, one of the few cities that was open about the flu was San Francisco...and they had fewer problems, because of this. San Francisco made a mistake, beween the second and third waves: They rang the 'all clear' bells too soon. People came out, celebrating, and restarted their lives...a few week later, the third wave hit, killing many.

It is estimated that as much as 40%of the workforce could be out, during various stages of a pandemic...too sick or too afraid to go to work. In parts of Canada, laws are being drafted to try and force medical personnel to work throughout a pandemic. Nobody is actully too sure, about the supply chain. Would YOU go to work? If there's enforced quarantine, this may become a moot point.
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