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View Full Version : Boy expelled for mapping school for shootemup game



Hellbent
May 3rd, 2007, 03:38 PM
http://digitalvillage.blogspot.com/2007/05/expelled-for-recreating-school-in-game.html

basically a kid made a map (a world) based on his high school for a first person shooter game called counter-strike. he has dont nothing illegal, but was still expelled and will not graduate with his class. his locker, person, and room were searched and only ceremonial knives were found.

GnosticWarrior
May 3rd, 2007, 10:48 PM
They might actually be giving him a good reason to turn his fantasy into reality... :D

The school officials probably felt some kind of public pressure to take some action and so they did. That was a tough decision to make. But good leadership can never side with those who over react. Public discussion and town meetings regarding the situation might have been better. Having the boy's name being attributed as the reason for creating those discussions might be punishment enough for the boy.

Adri
May 3rd, 2007, 11:49 PM
Wasn't there also recently (post VT) a kid who was in a class with a writing assignment to write something "without filtering anything" and he wrote something violent and, I think, based on his school, and got suspended? I can see how it could be tough to tell when to act, when it's overreacting and when there isn't enough action. When is something just darkly creative or really a sign of psychosis or a real threat of violence?

If the kid that Hellbent mentioned was in a "zero-tolerance" school, then having any knives (even if they're ceremonial) may be enough to get him expelled.

Hellbent
May 4th, 2007, 07:35 AM
The knives were in his room, and were dull. Also, he was asian, I beleive the article says.
Great idea, lets take all the criminal and delinquint kids out of school, where they might have learned something and instead let them do whatevers at home.

Hellbent
May 4th, 2007, 07:43 AM
Also, video game map making is like using CAD, its a skill (assuming he did a good job) and there are thousands of maps for counter-strike. There are several of locations in Hawaii. By making him promise not to make any maps of any actual places, it stiffles any creative talent expressed in map making he might have had.
Now counter-strike (CS) is a hugely popular game, its akin to cops vs terrorists and came out about 8 years ago, pre 9/11. Yes it simulates violence, you get to run around and shoot each other with various guns, but whats next? Banning kids from playing cowboys and indians?

GnosticWarrior
May 4th, 2007, 09:39 AM
Wasn't there also recently (post VT) a kid who was in a class with a writing assignment to write something "without filtering anything" and he wrote something violent and, I think, based on his school, and got suspended? I can see how it could be tough to tell when to act, when it's overreacting and when there isn't enough action. When is something just darkly creative or really a sign of psychosis or a real threat of violence?

If the kid that Hellbent mentioned was in a "zero-tolerance" school, then having any knives (even if they're ceremonial) may be enough to get him expelled.

Yes, what we are after is the appropriate response to prevent future outbursts of violence that creates deaths. I am unaware of how schools implement "zero-tolerance" but I think that kind of attitude is actually counter productive in decreasing violent outbursts. Aggression is a real human emotion. Its suppression can only lead to an eventual uncontrolled outburst. Learning to control one's aggression and channeling it into more positive manifestations is the solution.

Another goal should be learning empathy for all people, even the killers. They are human just like you and I. But I think we treat them more as aliens and this "zero-tolerance" only breeds more killers. And hating them is the worst thing we can do. Like our policies in Iraq are only breeding more future terrorists.

Adri
May 4th, 2007, 11:09 AM
Yes, what we are after is the appropriate response to prevent future outbursts of violence that creates deaths. I am unaware of how schools implement "zero-tolerance" but I think that kind of attitude is actually counter productive in decreasing violent outbursts. Aggression is a real human emotion. Its suppression can only lead to an eventual uncontrolled outburst. Learning to control one's aggression and channeling it into more positive manifestations is the solution.

Another goal should be learning empathy for all people, even the killers. They are human just like you and I. But I think we treat them more as aliens and this "zero-tolerance" only breeds more killers. And hating them is the worst thing we can do. Like our policies in Iraq are only breeding more future terrorists.

I believe zero tolerance schools means exactly that. There are stories such as a kid who brought a butter knife to school (for some kind of project) and a kid with aspirin and both were supposedly suspended. The students and parents were told that there would be absolutely no knives, guns or weapons and no drugs (they were counting the aspirin as a drug, of course) in the school or there would be disciplinary action. It's easy to make it sound silly but it's not easy to make and implement a policy that works with a balance of individual rights and freedoms and security.

I heard there was a lot of criticism, especially of Fox news, of repetitively calling the VT gunman a "monster" and such. But there was a lot more criticism of the media giving the gunman so much publicity (and in some cases sympathy) that people felt it would encourage copycats.

timkona
May 4th, 2007, 05:44 PM
Ban Cowboys and Indians????

http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,21243389-661,00.html

oops, guess it's been done already.

We could play Hawaiians and Oahuans. I get to be Kamehameha.

Keith H.
May 6th, 2007, 06:42 PM
http://digitalvillage.blogspot.com/2007/05/expelled-for-recreating-school-in-game.html

basically a kid made a map (a world) based on his high school for a first person shooter game called counter-strike. he has dont nothing illegal, but was still expelled and will not graduate with his class. his locker, person, and room were searched and only ceremonial knives were found.

OK, I confess! I had thoughts of knocking down the WTC (http://www.pineapplejuice.net/freshly-squeezed/2006/09/five_years_late_1.html) in September 2001! Arrest me now and send me to Guantanamo! :rolleyes:

TuNnL
May 9th, 2007, 03:37 AM
The students and parents were told that there would be absolutely no knives, guns or weapons and no drugs (they were counting the aspirin as a drug, of course) in the school or there would be disciplinary action.Adri, you have now twice brought up the knives and I am at a loss as to how you think this is relevant. He didn’t bring the knives to school. So whether or not he owned them is completely immaterial to this incident. :confused:

Adri
May 9th, 2007, 09:30 AM
Adri, you have now twice brought up the knives and I am at a loss as to how you think this is relevant. He didnít bring the knives to school. So whether or not he owned them is completely immaterial to this incident. :confused:

The first time I mentioned it, it was in response to Hellbent's post that "basically a kid made a map (a world) based on his high school for a first person shooter game called counter-strike. he has dont nothing illegal, but was still expelled and will not graduate with his class. his locker, person, and room were searched and only ceremonial knives were found. (Emphasis added)". It wasn't clear to me from Hellbent's initial post that the knives weren't at school. The second time I mentioned knives, I said "There are stories such as a kid who brought a butter knife to school (for some kind of project)", which was a reference to a completely different case and just an example of "zero tolerance".

TuNnL
May 10th, 2007, 11:25 AM
It wasn't clear to me from Hellbent's initial post that the knives weren't at school.Thanks for clarifying, Adri. Next time read the linked article (http://digitalvillage.blogspot.com/2007/05/expelled-for-recreating-school-in-game.html), which makes it quite clear. ;)