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woodman
September 28th, 2007, 01:03 PM
The 2007 Hawaii Forest Industry Association's "Hawaii Woodshow" is over.

There were some interesting pieces, though I find that it varies from year to year.

This year, I had left-over lumber from a large dresser that I made out of curly mango wood. I used it to buld a pair of matching sofa tables.

Here are a few shots of the sketches. I still have to dig out shots of the actual piece. I'll post them as soon as I find the chip. You won't believe how nice the wood looks; after all, it's "Mango" wood.

woodman
September 28th, 2007, 01:33 PM
Here are a few shots of the dresser.

The first shot is a sketch I showed my client, but they (he & his wife) changed the design of the base.

There is no way that you can appreciate this piece from any single angle. The front shot is nice, but if you see the sides, back, and top, you might get a better idea of just how cool this thing actually looks, IRL.

1stwahine
September 28th, 2007, 01:44 PM
It's beautiful!

I can imagine the price!

I like know.;)

Auntie Lynn

buzz1941
September 28th, 2007, 04:19 PM
Mango is beautiful wood. I find koa difficult to work with -- it chips too easily!

woodman
September 28th, 2007, 07:06 PM
It's beautiful!

I can imagine the price!
I like know.;)

Auntie Lynn


Naahh! You not my Aunty!

I've been reading posts on this site for a while. I like the way you think, but the Admin wouldn't even let me post until they were assured that I wasn't a trouble-maker.

EXPENSIVE!!!
It took 18 months to build.

The wood was wet (subject to reaction) and the entire load was infested with powder post beatles. Still, it was good wood, and I trust the guy that I got it from.

I wish that I could take credit, but when wood is this good, I'm just a pretender.

Check out these shots of the side panel:

Oh, that middle pic is just a repeat.
Sorry, but I really don't know how to post well, yet.

kamuelakea
September 28th, 2007, 07:18 PM
Wow woodman. Nice!

I did a little woodworking myself when I had the time and space. That's the nicest thing I've seen made out of mango. I almost don't believe its mango.

And to make nice things out of wood is one thing. But to make moving drawers and cupboards is way harder. I know!

Cannot beat nice wood furniture. You are being modest when you say it is the wood but I do know what you mean. When the grain and curl is good, its easier to make it look good.

I love the simple designs that dominate Hawaiian woodworking. Personally cannot stand the complex ornate european or even some of the Asian furniture. Just keep it simple and put the grain on display. Of course Koa was and is the standard and that's mostly what I've worked with, but I am always amazed at how you guyz make what used to be rubbish wood look so good.

Someday I'll get back into it. Woodworking and paddling, the only natural ways I know of to calm the nerves.

1stwahine
September 28th, 2007, 08:16 PM
Naahh! You not my Aunty!

I've been reading posts on this site for a while. I like the way you think, but the Admin wouldn't even let me post until they were assured that I wasn't a trouble-maker.

EXPENSIVE!!!
It took 18 months to build.

The wood was wet (subject to reaction)

Me think? LOL Me is PUPULE!:) Admin still scratches his head from approving me.heheheh

18 months? Wow!! Can make two babies.:eek:

No wonda da wood was wet.:p

Welcome to HT!!

Lynn

woodman
September 28th, 2007, 08:29 PM
... Personally cannot stand the complex ornate european or even some of the Asian furniture. Just keep it simple and put the grain on display.

... Someday I'll get back into it.


As far as artistic complexity is concerned, I have to agree with you.

I cannot see any value in wasting rare Hawaiian hardwoods for some sort of academic exercise. Interestingly enough, my hardest lessons came from mistakes I made on expensive Hawaiian hardwoods mostly curly koa.

I was building small things at that time, so my impact (as far as "waste/loss" is concerned) was minimized.

Don't wait for "someday" to get back into it.

Stay in touch with HFIA.
Each year they have an instructional seminar, and if that's not enough, then they can put you in contact with other organizations that will help you learn what you want to know.

Try search "Furniture Society".

It's a bunch of artists who make furniture from all types of medium; wood, plastic, glass, metal, mixed materials alloys and fibers.

They meet for conference once-a-year; people so smart that they make me think I'm in the wrong profession after I see how easy they make it look.

woodman
September 28th, 2007, 08:36 PM
18 months? Wow!! Can make two babies.:eek:



Well, you can try.

Just don't forget the two BIG "OOowwiiieee!!!!" that go with 'em if you should succeed.

woodman
September 28th, 2007, 08:39 PM
... Personally cannot stand the complex ornate european or even some of the Asian furniture. Just keep it simple and put the grain on display.

... Someday I'll get back into it.


As far as artistic complexity is concerned, I have to agree with you.

I cannot see any value in wasting rare Hawaiian hardwoods for some sort of academic exercise. Interestingly enough, my hardest lessons came from mistakes I made on expensive Hawaiian hardwoods mostly curly koa.

I was building small things at that time, so my impact (as far as "waste/loss" is concerned) was minimized.

Don't wait for "someday" to get back into it.

Stay in touch with HFIA.
Each year they have an instructional seminar, and if that's not enough, then they can put you in contact with other organizations that will help you learn what you want to know.

Try search "Furniture Society".

It's a bunch of artists who make furniture from all types of medium; wood, plastic, glass, metal, mixed materials alloys and fibers.

They meet for conference once-a-year; people so smart that they make me think I'm in the wrong profession after I see how easy they make it look.

woodman
September 28th, 2007, 08:52 PM
... I find koa difficult to work with -- it chips too easily!


In my experience, koa varies dramatically, not just from one board to the next, but from one end of a single board to the other end of that same board.

Some sawyers are just not concerned with cutting for quality as they are with cutting for quantity; and once they cut the wood, there is almost no concern to "cure" the lumber as much as there is an imperative to "dry" the wood and get it off to market.

So, Buzz, if you want the good stuff, then you have to buy "green" koa and let it air dry for several months before doing a slow & controlled easy-kiln dry on your load of lumber.

Forced air/heat drying will give you case-hardened wood that you cannot bend to fit projects. It also makes the wood more brittle which may account for some of the problems you've ben having re: "chipping".

woodman
September 28th, 2007, 09:01 PM
... Personally cannot stand the complex ornate european or even some of the Asian furniture. Just keep it simple and put the grain on display.

... Someday I'll get back into it.


As far as artistic complexity is concerned, I have to agree with you.

I cannot see any value in wasting rare Hawaiian hardwoods for some sort of academic exercise. Interestingly enough, my hardest lessons came from mistakes I made on expensive Hawaiian hardwoods mostly curly koa.

I was building small things at that time, so my impact (as far as "waste/loss" is concerned) was minimized.

Don't wait for "someday" to get back into it.

Stay in touch with HFIA.
Each year they have an instructional seminar, and if that's not enough, then they can put you in contact with other organizations that will help you learn what you want to know.

Try search "Furniture Society".

It's a bunch of artists who make furniture from all types of medium; wood, plastic, glass, metal, mixed materials alloys and fibers.

They meet for conference once-a-year; people so smart that they make me think I'm in the wrong profession after I see how easy they make it look.

1stwahine
September 28th, 2007, 09:02 PM
Hui! I'm so glad you joined HT! With your expertise and knowledge, we all can learn. You also have a sense of humor and I like that. heheheh Sometimes this place can be so heated make me SCARED!:eek:

HAHAHAHAHA

Love and Aloha

Lynn

woodman
September 28th, 2007, 09:17 PM
With your expertise and knowledge, we all can learn.



OMG, you can't be serious.

I've been feeding you facts from all that I've learned by SCREWING-UP!

If this were academy, and with me as instructor, you stand ZERO chance of accreditation and a good chance of punitive sanction.

Buy a book and save yourself while you still can.

Pomai
September 29th, 2007, 12:05 AM
Buy a book and save yourself while you still can.Which leads me to question (without Googling): Has ANYONE ever attempted to build one of those woodwork pieces shown with complete blueprints in Popular Mechanics magazine? They're usually so complex and daunting to even try! Unless you have all the bench power tools, hand tools, blades, bits, and whatever else it requires to build it. Not to mention skill and patience.

Sheesh... just successfully building and finishing knock-down furniture like Whittier is difficult enough! But worth it.

There's some amazing local Ukulele builders out there. I know one who commands GRAND$$$ for his Ukes, and whom has a two-year waiting list. Custom Pearl inlays, concave back, choice of Japan or German-made keys, tone-balanced... the whole 9-yards (or fretboard). :eek: ;)

acousticlady
September 29th, 2007, 03:52 AM
That is absolutely beautiful Woodman. My brother also makes beautiful stuff. He learned the hard way too. He learned while escaping from the wicked witch from the east - whose name is now plaintiff :D (it's amazing how common that name is!) I'm trying to talk him into moving to Hawaii and working with real wood and making it a business. BTW - welcome to HT.

woodman
September 29th, 2007, 08:29 AM
[edit: sorry 1stwahine, I forgot to say "thankyou" (and all others) for all the kind words.]

Pomai,


The problem with those types of project you describe is not just with the tools.

Projects are done in steps, and stages.

During the building process, there are specific "steps" one must follow in order to complete a particular "stage" of construction. Each step must be done correctly, and in the proper order, before moving on to the next step.

...blah, blah, blah; it all sounds to vague, so let me try to explain it like this:

If you are building a structure that requires glue-up, it is important to dry-fit the assembly in order to make sure that the joints fit properly prior to gluing. Easy enough, right?

But with most such projects, it is also important to sand and finish the interior BEFORE you glue up because once you get the structure permanently joined, it is becomes 10 times more difficult (and time consuming) to try to sand and finish the interior afte it's been put together.

[BRAINFART]
While you're sanding, you have to consciously avoid the points-of-contact where the joints meet otherwise you'll sand the joint down and ruin the fit (FYI -and you may already know this, but- never sand or apply finish to the contact points of a joint).
[/ BRAINFART]

So the progression of steps might look something like this:

1.) cut joints
2.) check joints by dry fit
3.) sand interior
4.) apply blocking over the joint (to block the finish from covering the joint)
5.) apply finish (could be oil, lacquer, varnish, ..whatever)
6.) allow finish to cure
7.) glue-up

...all in that order.

So, it's not just not just a matter of getting the joints cut to the proper size and gluing the pieces together. It all has to be done in the proper order, AND you have to be conscious of what you are doing so that you don't screw anything up.

Funny, they never seem to mention that in the plans, do they!

1stwahine
September 29th, 2007, 08:53 AM
Mr. Woodwork,

K-den.

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w161/1stwahine2/HPIM2897.jpg

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w161/1stwahine2/HPIM2898.jpg

My table above is made out of KOA. I've had it ova thirty years. The problem is the bugga only get three legs.hahahah Every time huli ova. Wat can I buy to make it stable and not handicap like me!:p The top needs to be sanded and whateva's too.

Mahalo

Lynn without the Auntie.

Pomai
September 29th, 2007, 08:53 AM
So, it's not just not just a matter of getting the joints cut to the proper size and gluing the pieces together. It all has to be done in the proper order, AND you have to be conscious of what you are doing so that you don't screw anything up.

Funny, they never seem to mention that in the plans, do they!Nope! They just make it look sooooooo eeeeeeeasy. Yeah, right! :eek:

Do you teach woodcrafting? You should!

Going back to that Uke' builder I know, he took just ONE class (well, a series under one teacher) at a community college, and with that, went above and beyond the call of duty.

Here's his work....
GKU Ukulele (http://gkuhi.tripod.com/ukepics.html)

Pomai
September 29th, 2007, 08:55 AM
Eh Auntie, no can qualify hea unless you made 'em yo'self!

K, K, if you sand da' buggah and refinish 'em, den' can. lol

You know, you can make like 5 Ukuleles out of that table?


Mr. Woodwork,

K-den.

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w161/1stwahine2/HPIM2897.jpg

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w161/1stwahine2/HPIM2898.jpg

My table above is made out of KOA. I've had it ova thirty years. The problem is the bugga only get three legs.hahahah Every time huli ova. Wat can I buy to make it stable and not handicap like me!:p The top needs to be sanded and whateva's too.

Mahalo

Lynn without the Auntie.

1stwahine
September 29th, 2007, 08:58 AM
Eh Auntie, no can qualify hea unless you made 'em yo'self!

K, K, if you sand da' buggah and refinish 'em, den' can. lol

You know, you can make like 5 Ukuleles out of that table?

Go away! I trying to be serious ova hea!:p

I pity my table...only get three legs.heheheh

Auntie Lynn

alohatim
September 29th, 2007, 09:14 AM
It is a beautiful table, Auntie--needs no pity!

..but I am imagining 5 beautiful ukes too!

woodman
September 29th, 2007, 09:35 AM
Mr. Woodwork,

K-den.

...The problem is the bugga only get three legs.
... Every time huli ova.


1stwahine,

Those types of tables are remarkably unstable. They should actually have SIX legs, four in trapazoid patern, and one at the apex of the curve on each end.



... Wat can I buy to make it stable?



A new table. :(




... The top needs to be sanded and whateva's too.

Mahalo

Lynn without the Auntie.

You'll have to remove the legs, first. That should make it easier.

Go to the hadrware store and buy a stripper, then strip the legs and top. Wera thick gloves and use coarse steel wool & paint thinner (or lacquer thinner) to scrub off excess striping chemical.

Now you can get the sanded.

There are several shops that have large-belt thicknes sanders. Try calling Bello's Millworks in Wahiawa. They charge a minimum of (I think) $45. Let them know that you stripped and cleaned the top and that it is only a one-man job (should take 10 minutes). Tell them you want even thickness at 120 grit on both sides.

The legs you can sand yourself at home.

I'll be ack with more, later.


Here is more mango to drool over. It's a pair of matching end tables.

II GTG to work now.

1stwahine
September 29th, 2007, 09:35 AM
It is a beautiful table, Auntie--needs no pity!

..but I am imagining 5 beautiful ukes too!

Alohatim, you just saying dat to get back at me foa wat I said about the "prisoners!"

TOO FUNNY!

And if can make da ukes wat happens to da legs? Guiros?:p

HAHAHAHAHAH

Auntie Lynn

1stwahine
September 29th, 2007, 09:42 AM
Aloha Mr. Woodman,

Mahalo for answering my questions. I'll wait for my odda half to come home and show him da post cause he da one going do the labor. I only clean da hale, make shua kaukau is served and spend $$$.heheheh

ROFLMAO

It's a great Saturday so far!:)

Love and Aloha

Lynn

woodman
September 29th, 2007, 11:46 AM
Well, I couldn't find those pics of the sofa tables. I had to go to the hardware store, so I stopped by the gallery where they have it on display and took more pics. They're not as good as the others, though.

Okay this stuff is taking forever if I do multiples so I'm going to have to upload pics in separate posts.

Here is one:

woodman
September 29th, 2007, 12:08 PM
trying again:

woodman
September 29th, 2007, 12:12 PM
one last time:

...nothing happened.

1stwahine
September 29th, 2007, 12:18 PM
one last time:

...nothing happened.

You can upload three pics on one post if you use photobucket.com.

It's FREE.

Lynn

woodman
September 29th, 2007, 01:02 PM
You can upload three pics on one post if you use photobucket.com.

It's FREE.

Lynn

Are you kidding?

I'm having trouble uploading just ONE!

Trying again:

Pomai
September 29th, 2007, 01:20 PM
trying again:Absolutely beautiful work. I bet it looks even better in person.

How much would one of these Mango Wood Sofa Tables cost? Just curious.

I'm guessing $500? If not around that, more, not less.

Can I trade you some Pirie Mangoes for the table? They're sweet and ono! Can't say that about the table, can ya? lol

buzz1941
September 29th, 2007, 02:08 PM
I've been making little things out of koa, bases for model figures:

http://www.planetfigure.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=12015&d=1186697875

The metal bit on top is part of the model.

The koa I have is quite dry. It chips whilst routing the bevels.

woodman
September 29th, 2007, 03:32 PM
I've been making little things out of koa, bases for model figures:

http://www.planetfigure.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=12015&d=1186697875

The metal bit on top is part of the model.

The koa I have is quite dry. It chips whilst routing the bevels.

That's how it starts.

Just remember, woodwork is not an addiction. It's a disease.

woodman
September 29th, 2007, 08:42 PM
BTW, buzz, that looks nice.

1stwahine, what'id your ol' man say?

Pomai
September 30th, 2007, 01:12 PM
Check out this Honu Hawaiian Sea Turtle Koa Jewelry Box...

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1163/1464582275_b20e99aa2d_o.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=1464582275&size=o)

What's neat is how the various pieces interlock like a 3-dimensional jigsaw puzzle...

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1109/1464582515_8dbf175539_o.jpg

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1012/1464582769_0f2ed14d0a_o.jpg

See next post for last stage...

Pomai
September 30th, 2007, 01:16 PM
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1372/1464583043_1c98824337_o.jpg

My girlfriend got this as a Christmas gift from a former coworker. IIRC, the shop was located in Ward Center.

The actual size is 4-1/2" length x 2-1/4" height x 1-3/4" deep.

Once again, the whole thing...

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1163/1464582275_b20e99aa2d_o.jpg

Pretty cool!

woodman
September 30th, 2007, 07:59 PM
RIGHT-ON, Pomai!

Nice scroll work.

woodman
October 1st, 2007, 10:30 AM
Do you teach woodcrafting? You should!



I might. at some future date.

Being trapped in the shop all day has diminished my social skills, especially in the speaking department.




...I bet it looks even better in person.

How much would one of these Mango Wood Sofa Tables cost? Just curious.

I'm guessing $500? If not around that,


You're guessing way too low.

Retail is $1,900, but that's after it goes to gallery, and yes, they do receive a commission.




Can I trade you some Pirie Mangoes for the table? They're sweet and ono! Can't say that about the table, can ya? lol


Ha, ha!

No, but for 100 board feet of clean S4S 4/4 curly mango lumber, you've got yourself a deal. Will also trade 40 b/f of rough sawn, 8/4 premium curly koa.

cezanne
October 1st, 2007, 05:54 PM
Nice work on the dresser Woodman! I like to make sawdust too... it's one of my releases from the real world. I make smaller stuff like boxes and ukes tho. I have a plan from one of the woodworking mags for a small Shaker-style side table that I want to make out of koa or mango. Is furniture making your business or do you do it as a hobby?

Here are a few shots of the dresser.

The first shot is a sketch I showed my client, but they (he & his wife) changed the design of the base.

There is no way that you can appreciate this piece from any single angle. The front shot is nice, but if you see the sides, back, and top, you might get a better idea of just how cool this thing actually looks, IRL.

cezanne
October 1st, 2007, 05:57 PM
Wow did you make that? Props on the creativity...

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1372/1464583043_1c98824337_o.jpg

My girlfriend got this as a Christmas gift from a former coworker. IIRC, the shop was located in Ward Center.

The actual size is 4-1/2" length x 2-1/4" height x 1-3/4" deep.

Once again, the whole thing...

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1163/1464582275_b20e99aa2d_o.jpg

Pretty cool!

i-hungry
October 15th, 2007, 12:30 AM
I can make some good koa toothpicks.