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View Full Version : Increased Pests/Mice anyone?



islandguy
September 16th, 2008, 09:18 PM
Hey guys (and gals!) It seems there is a tremendous increase in pest activity in the building I live in. We have had problems with ants and a few roaches.
I checked our doors and windows, and I found a bent screen that does not fit flush with the window sill, and it appears we are seeing more and more ants in the house. We have emptied all closets, hampers, etc and swept, dusted, and mopped with bleach and strong household cleaner. It has seemed to stop them a little, but we still see a few here and there on the bathroom sink and on the counter in the kitchen. We just spray the ants and the area with Bleach Cleaner ($1.37 at walmart) and let it sit for a few minutes, then clean ants and bleach up.

We have had Ecolab (professional pest control) out twice. The first time was to spray OUTSIDE for roaches, and man this guy REALLY SPRAYED! He was a cool local guy, and he sprayed so much roach spray it looked like someone had spray painted a white line around our home outside. Then we started to see TONS of dead roaches outside. He told us to keep these swept up, or the ants would come and carry them off, then we would have ANT problems. So of course we are keeping them swept up.

The second time was to spray around the baseboards in our home for the ants. We did NOT ALLOW him to spray on the bedrooms, but the same guy went CRAZY again with the any spray, and he did a GREAT JOB! He CAKED IT ON! In fact, I had to get a old mop to mop up what did not dry up on its own. (Im wondering if I am gonna get something from the chemicals?)

Anyway, I also noticed that the front and back doors look like the weather stripping is bad, and the doors are not sealing all the way, especially around the bottoms.

Again, the maintance people will be out tomm to fix all these.

My question is anyone ELSE having similar problems NOW? I have been told by "experts" its the drought that is driving pests inside to find moisture and food. What do you think? Fact or crap?

Please share any similar stories you might have. Thanks!

:mad:

Opihimonster
September 17th, 2008, 03:04 AM
When I lived out in Ewa Beach, it was always hot and dry. Not to much ant problems, but lots of roaches (and once in while centipedes). We had lots of geckos too, which we all know is a mixed blessing as they'll eats the bugs...but leave presents all over the house. We had a mouse problem once, mainly set traps and tried to plug the hole they were using to get in.

Animals/bugs are going to come where there is food and safety/shelter and unfortunately the inside of the house fits well. Whenever they burn the cane field behind my mom's house there is a mass exodus of bugs/rats into the neighborhood...mainly cane spiders.

zff
September 17th, 2008, 08:44 AM
Curious.

About a month ago, we noticed a rodent problem in my office. The pest control guy has been coming by on a regular basis, and he's caught 5 rats so far. The largest one had a body longer than that tall green can of Arizona iced tea.

Just two days ago, while working on my car, I saw a mouse scurry into my garage from the street. I managed to scare it back out into the street, but I have never seen mice in my neighborhood before.

It would be interesting if Oahu were experiencing a sudden increase in the pest population. Sounds like the opening scenes of a sci-fi thriller.

lavagal
September 17th, 2008, 09:37 AM
OK, I'll fess up. I'm out in Hawaii Kai and we have mice in the house. It is driving me bonkers. We have a single-wall construction home, but they seem to use the pipes as their causeway. We have two outside cats, getting fat on mice they capture outside. Our indoor cat died back in December. She wasn't a mouser, but she was more of a pointer and we'd get them once she cornered them into a glue trap. So here we are with cats outside, one of whom performs sentry duty on the roof (she's the BEST!), and my big furry boy does his share on the ground.

What was surprising to me was that they liked the pumpkin seeds we had dried and put on the back of the counter in a bag. Not the Oreos. Not the fresh fruit or onions. But the pumpkin seeds. Oh yeah, they like crumbs in the toaster.

You can bet NOTHING is out any more but little cubes of rodent drugs. I hope it does the trick.

We use an exterminator twice a year to apply an ant barrier inside and out. He also maintains our termite bait stations. His company is called Grim Reaper. When we tent we go with Sandwich Isles. It's about time for another tenting.

Da Rolling Eye
September 17th, 2008, 11:29 AM
OK, I'll fess up. I'm out in Hawaii Kai and we have mice in the house. It is driving me bonkers. We have a single-wall construction home, but they seem to use the pipes as their causeway. We have two outside cats, getting fat on mice they capture outside. Our indoor cat died back in December. She wasn't a mouser, but she was more of a pointer and we'd get them once she cornered them into a glue trap. So here we are with cats outside, one of whom performs sentry duty on the roof (she's the BEST!), and my big furry boy does his share on the ground.

What was surprising to me was that they liked the pumpkin seeds we had dried and put on the back of the counter in a bag. Not the Oreos. Not the fresh fruit or onions. But the pumpkin seeds. Oh yeah, they like crumbs in the toaster.

You can bet NOTHING is out any more but little cubes of rodent drugs. I hope it does the trick.

We use an exterminator twice a year to apply an ant barrier inside and out. He also maintains our termite bait stations. His company is called Grim Reaper. When we tent we go with Sandwich Isles. It's about time for another tenting.

Do you have trees touching or near your roof line? It's one of the most common ways rats and mice get into homes. They'll get on the roof via trees and climb down the plumbing vents, those extra pipes you see sticking up from your roof.

Also, if you have patio sliding screens and doors, check the weather stripping. Also make it a point to close the doors in the evenings especially if noone's going to be in the patio. Those small gaps at the bottom and tops of that sliding screen is enough for mice to get in.

Fruit trees in your backyard also attract rodents. Keep old coffee cans and use them as ratguards on your tree trunks. Just cut the cans open and wrap them around the tree. Rats' claws can't hold on smooth metal. Pick up any fallen fruit promptly. This also helps to keep fruit fly numbers down.

This weather has been really bad for ant problems. We have old termite damage and it seems all of them are now inhabited with ants. You can tell as the ants clean out the nests of old termite doodoo, usually dark brown. If it's very light, it's fresh and you got termites. :eek: Bad part about that is it can be all over the place. :(

We're also in the process of looking for a pest control company to periodically treat our yard and house. Most seem to offer a yearly maintainance program which includes termites.

1stwahine
September 17th, 2008, 12:26 PM
We use an exterminator twice a year to apply an ant barrier inside and out. He also maintains our termite bait stations. His company is called Grim Reaper. When we tent we go with Sandwich Isles. It's about time for another tenting.

I'll do a plug for my hubby, a Renewal Inspector for Terminix®.
http://www.terminix.com/Exterminators/Hawaii/default.aspx

Auntie Lynn

leashlaws
September 17th, 2008, 01:11 PM
OK, I'll fess up. I'm out in Hawaii Kai and we have mice in the house. It is driving me bonkers. We have a single-wall construction home, but they seem to use the pipes as their causeway. We have two outside cats, getting fat on mice they capture outside. Our indoor cat died back in December. She wasn't a mouser, but she was more of a pointer and we'd get them once she cornered them into a glue trap. So here we are with cats outside, one of whom performs sentry duty on the roof (she's the BEST!), and my big furry boy does his share on the ground.

What was surprising to me was that they liked the pumpkin seeds we had dried and put on the back of the counter in a bag. Not the Oreos. Not the fresh fruit or onions. But the pumpkin seeds. Oh yeah, they like crumbs in the toaster.

You can bet NOTHING is out any more but little cubes of rodent drugs. I hope it does the trick.

We use an exterminator twice a year to apply an ant barrier inside and out. He also maintains our termite bait stations. His company is called Grim Reaper. When we tent we go with Sandwich Isles. It's about time for another tenting.

Instead of tenting with SI we had them do this:
HomeGuard Inspection and Borate Treatment Program—The Green Solution to Termite Control
HomeGuard treatments comprise several application methods to reach areas of insect activity and eliminate it, wherever it hides. Large areas, such as attics and crawl spaces may be sprayed through custom treating devices. Sandwich Isle Pest Solutions uses a specially designed mist delivery system carrying "BORATES" to treat those areas that are otherwise inaccessible. In this process, the needle mist applicator carries the BORATES to the infested wood. A slow penetrating mist will adhere to your wood. Areas of known activity may be drilled and injected with liquid BORATES. This floods hollowed-out areas, insuring consistent coverage.

The HomeGuard Inspection and Treatment Program is based upon the strategic placement of borates in multiple formulations applied to all structural wood in your home. A variety of custom built application equipment is utilized to apply borate infused liquids, dust, foam, mist and spray into all structural lumber.

Borates penetrate into wood fibers, actually becoming part of the wood itself. If wood destroying organisms attempt to feed from the treated area, the residual material in the wood slowly eliminates them. Learn more here.

Borate is a mineral salt that is less toxic to humans, pets, birds and fish than table salt, yet it is deadly to insect pests. And because it is a mineral salt, it will not break down over time. When it is sprayed onto the wood, it penetrates deep into the wood and remains there for the life of the wood, providing lasting protection.

Benefits of HomeGuard Inspection and Treatment Program.

Residual Protection - For the life of the wood.
No one has to leave the home during the treatment.
No damage to roofing or plants.
Borates inhibit wood decay in treated lumber.
General Pest Protection - Treated wood will assist in protecting against other pests like ants/roaches.


It was way easier than tenting. We also haver termidor around our house.

We have a few rats from the avocado and citrus trees of our neighbor. Sometimes I see them jumping around in the trees:eek: We have monthly
rodent control where they bait those black boxes with stuff to kill them.
We had a dead one about 2 weeks ago on the deck died right in it's tracks.

In the summer it seems we always have more roaches but have the guy spray for them under the sink and that seems to help. When they do the bi-monthly spraying there are always dead roaches that come out of the woodwork (literally) and die on the floor. Ants are plentiful in certain areas outside but they spray for those too.

islandguy
September 17th, 2008, 05:42 PM
Thanks guys! Tons of USEFUL information in those posts! We had our weather stripping around outside screen doors fixed today, and they installed a new separate weather strip INSIDE the door as well so we have 2 now. I was told by housing inspector gaps at bottom on drywall behind baseboard are NORMAL, it is done that way to help if water should break.

I am going to get a cover (grill) for the dryer vent tomm to help keep critters out (we havent had any yet!) of the dryer. Also they are coming to spray again outside for da roaches, and inside for the ants, as well as put more mouse/rat bait boxes outside. There is only ONE on the side of our building, housing said they need more in FRONT.

Also, appliance guys (separate guys from maintance!) are coming out to pull dishwasher to check for rodents/pests under the sinks.

Thanks again for the great information!

timkona
September 17th, 2008, 05:55 PM
(Im wondering if I am gonna get something from the chemicals?)

Better living through chemistry. You gotta die of sumfin.

sophielynette
September 17th, 2008, 06:48 PM
I have a big problem with rat/mice bait, and not just because I love rodents. I lost a very beloved dog to rat poison, and I'll never forget sitting in the animal hospital with her as she trembled and drooled. It took her two days to die.

Want to know the most humane way to keep rodents out of your house? Get a couple of pet rats. A few years back my apartment complex had an entire colony of rats, but they never came into my apartment because I had the pet rats. Rodents are very territorial and if they smell another rodent has taken up residence somewhere, chances are they'll stay away.

lavagal
September 17th, 2008, 07:19 PM
Sorry about your experience, Sophielynette. But, I won't be getting any pet rats anytime soon. My cats wouldn't understand. All of our bait is in places the outdoor cats can't get to. And according to my exterminator, were the cats to capture and eat one of the mice that snacked on the bait cubes, it wouldn't poison the cat. it's a blood thinner, from what I understand, that wouldn't affect the cats.

Leashlaws: Terrific input. I will definitely look into S.I.'s Borate treatment program. How frequently does it need to be done? We have our regular guy for twice yearly sessions, but if this is something only a big company like S.I. can do, then I would ask them about it. I like S.I. I thought they did a great job. While the house was getting tented, I ran into the boss of the job who raided my garage fridge and ate the entire lasagna tray I had in there. I forgot about it! I was happy the guys found something good to eat and completed the job with full, content bellies.

LikaNui
September 17th, 2008, 08:41 PM
NORMAL, it is done that way to help if water should break.
*resisting*

*straining harder to resist*

*Can. Not. Resist*

Gee, I hate it when my water breaks.

Wait. I'm male.

Never mind.
Carry on.
:o

islandguy
September 29th, 2008, 09:24 PM
We found the mouse hole. Building Maintance came out today and I asked them to pull the dish washer out from wall (it is bolted to countertop) and low and behold mouse hole in wall near floor. Some poop, but not too much.
It looked like the mouse had been using this hole it get under the sink from outside, and the was scurrying up the BACK of the dish washer to the top of the hollow splash wall that runs UNDER the sink and INTO the area below the sink where we placed our trash can. This was his "stealth" entrance into our kitchen via the drywall. They filled the hole with expanding foam sealant. While in the process of replacing hot water line from under sink, they also noticed that it appeared that they were coming in from inside the wall around the hot water inlet via the drywall. I saw NO POOP THERE, but if you pull the insulator ring away from the drywall that is supposed to cover the hole where the pipe comes through, it looked like something had chewed that as well, so they also filled this with expanding foam sealant.

Now I feel better knowing something was done to TRY to keep them out. I have never found any poop in the house, only 2 little specks under the sink (our counters/cabinets are sealed, single individual units, they are NOT connected together, so that is why the mouse did not get into the house.

We have removed the trash can from under the kitchen sink, and are careful to take ALL TRASH OUT nightly, and we have never left any dirty dishes in the sink, we ALWAYS put them in the dish washer.

Neighbors SWEAR they have seen no mice (neighbor whos wall is connected to ours via the sink) but he got in someway. We NEVER leave any doors open PERIOD, only windows, so I doubt he came in that way.

Hole looked OLD and looked as if it had been used for a LONG TIME. Who knows how long or how many trips he has made with the previous renters (we have only lived here 6 months!)

Anyway, glue traps are STILL under the sink, and I still have the sink doors BLOCKED CLOSED with a ottoman, until I am "confident" they are gone.

Composite 2992
September 30th, 2008, 08:14 AM
For termites we used Gima Pest Control. He does a great job of explaining things.

For routine ant and roach problems, check out Dead Fast from Longs Drugs and City Mill.

Just draw lines where ever the pests might cross. The bugs die within minutes.
http://dead-fast.com/solutions.aspx

kani-lehua
October 1st, 2008, 05:56 PM
you know, we never had mice in this house until recently. i just found droppings in the cupboard again. how the heck he/she is getting in, i don't know. darn cats and dogs ain't doing their jobs ;). one of the dogs did catch a varmit (spelling) about 6 mths ago. we don't leave food around except maybe fruit in a basket.

islandguy
October 2nd, 2008, 06:33 AM
Eco labs pest control tech says vermin (what I call all mice and rats! da little buggahs!) can get into the TINYEST SPOTS you thought they never could.
Look under sink for any "holes", even the tinyest ones. The hole near the hot water inlet was less than the size of a quarter, but that was another place they were getting in here.

I figured they were attracted to the garbage left under the sink, and just chewed a hole in the wall. There have been problems in my building (we live in a 4 unit single story) and your neighbors can cause problems for you in these cases. I have been watching this show called "verminators" and most of the vermin and roach/ant problems in building are caused by one neighbor who does not practice good housecleaning. I know this is NOT ALWAYS THE CASE, because our house, like yours, in kept CLEAN.

http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/verminators/verminators.html

We also have all candies and other "sweet stuff" that is not in the refrig in sandwich bags (hey I got a kid and I like candy too!!!!) and we have had no problems with ants in cabinets. All the activity seems to be near the kitchen.

Havent seen any more signs of mice at all since we caught theonly one we did see.

I can give you a suggestion, do not use POISION to catch/kill them, as they will climb back into where they came from a die, then STINK TO HIGH HEAVENS. Local kapunas (elders) told me to use GLUE TRAPS with a dot (about the size of a penny) of peanut butter in the MIDDLE OF TRAP to catch the buggah when he goes for a snack. I caught our mouse with a glue trap and NO PEANUT BUTTER (why attract MORE pests?).

I just picked the mouse up (still alive) still stuck on glue trap, and threw them BOTH into the trash.

Goodluck, I think it must be a "bad year" for pests, it is here on the North Shore. I have never had problems like I am now!

islandguy
October 2nd, 2008, 08:06 PM
http://www.nysipm.cornell.edu/publications/evictmice/


This has a LOT of good information about controlling mice and rats in the home!