PDA

View Full Version : Where do you get fire extinguishers recharged?



MyopicJoe
October 17th, 2008, 06:03 PM
For the life of me I can't find any info. Do fire departments recharge extinguishers? If not, do you have any recommendations?

Thanks in advance.

68-eldo
October 17th, 2008, 06:53 PM
How big is the extinguisher? If it is the standard household type its not worth it. The cost of recharging is more than a new one.

If it is a large industrial type then try one of these places (http://www.htyellowpages.com/yellowpagelistingresults.cfm?heading=Fire%20Exting uishers&state=HI&city=oahu)

MyopicJoe
October 17th, 2008, 07:12 PM
Doh, the Yellow Pages. I guess if I can't find information through Google, I don't believe it exists :p Thanks for the link, 68-Eldo!

Yeah, it's one of those real small kitchen ones. It just feels like a waste, throwing it away, but I can see what you mean by it being more expensive to recharge.

Maybe I'll let the kids play with the powder inside. I used to do that as a kid. It had a cool effect on the surface of water.

Hope it's not dangerous...:eek:

MyopicJoe
October 17th, 2008, 07:25 PM
According to Wikipedia, odds are the powder I remember as a kid was monoammonium phosphate (yellowish in color) with metal stearates added to make it water proof (the funky effect I remember).

Basically you could fill a glass jar with water, pour a layer of powder on top, and stick your finger through it, without getting it wet. The powder basically formed a skin.

This was like 20 years ago, so who knows what they have in fire extinguishers these days.


Oh, and yes, a disclaimer: DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME ;)

asuhoru
October 17th, 2008, 09:09 PM
Hey MJ,

I recommend just buying a new one. They're not that expensive. Depending on what the targets are, you might want to research what type you want. If its for home and in the kitchen, a 2A10BC is adequate. Of if its in the garage where you work on your car etc, maybe a 2A40BC would be better.

If you have several or more, then you might wanna have someone do maintenance on them. In the yellow pages under Fire Extinguishers or Extinguishing Systems there are several companies, none of which I can recommend, for you to choose from. You can contract them to come out yearly to do maintenance inspections which usually consist of ensuring the proper pressure inside the unit, making sure seals are ok and 'shaking' up caked up dry chem powder inside the unit.

As far as what to do with older extinguishers you want to throw away, practice with the old one. Yes. Teach your kids how it is used and use it. Once the pressure is out of the extinguisher you can dispose of it. Stay away from the dry chemical though. It is nasty up yer nose! :)

Aloha

DiverDown808
October 17th, 2008, 09:44 PM
We use a lot of fire extinguishers at the shipyard. First thing you should do is see if your extinguisher can actually be recharged. Most of the smaller ones are a one-time use extinguisher.

If it CAN be recharged, you can try Safety Systems in Kalihi on Waikamilo, or you can try Pacific Fire Protection and Oahu Fire Protection out in the Pearl City Industrial park.

These places should also be available to take any unwanted extinguishers, instead of letting the kids play with them. LOL

DD

Composite 2992
October 18th, 2008, 12:40 AM
I asked around a while back, when I had a halon extinguisher that was rechargeable.

The cost to recharge made getting a new one more sensible.

And for the dry chemical ones, the fire extinguisher companies here said the valve has to be replaced once it's used. And the cost of that can be rather high. Better to get a new one or two from Costco.

And be aware that you should inspect the extinguisher annually to make sure the dial indicator says there's sufficient pressure. The needle should be in the green band.

Sometimes old extinguishers are used to help train people how to use them. It's not as simple as you might think, especially if it's an oil or gasoline-fed fire. I put out a couple of vehicle engine fires and a small fire in a Chinese restaurant. The toughest was the car fire. The engine compartment is full of little nooks and crannies that kept re-igniting the fire. The best was halon, but that's now outlawed. The next option would be CO2, but they're heavy.

Dry chemical works, but you gotta be able to get into the engine compartment. Otherwise the chemical doesn't make contact with the fuel and won't extinguish the blaze.

Leo Lakio
October 18th, 2008, 04:41 PM
Sometimes old extinguishers are used to help train people how to use them. It's not as simple as you might thinkTraining often includes the acronym "PASS" - meaning:
Pull (the pin that keeps the extinguisher from being accidentally discharged)
Aim (the hose at the base of the fire, not above)
Squeeze (the handles together to start spraying)
Sweep (the spray back and forth at the base of the fire)

(Of course, I thought the acronym meant Panic And Save Self... :p)

Composite 2992
October 18th, 2008, 10:25 PM
Training often includes the acronym "PASS" - meaning:
Pull (the pin that keeps the extinguisher from being accidentally discharged)
Aim (the hose at the base of the fire, not above)
Squeeze (the handles together to start spraying)
Sweep (the spray back and forth at the base of the fire)

(Of course, I thought the acronym meant Panic And Save Self... :p)

You're thinking of: Pull Aim Squeeze Sweep, then Get Away Swiftly.... PASS GAS. :D

Seeking Penance
October 19th, 2008, 02:08 AM
i didn't even think you could recharge a fire extinguishers let alone possible.

Leo Lakio
October 19th, 2008, 08:55 AM
i didn't even think you could recharge a fire extinguishers let alone possible.Yes, larger ones, such as those in commercial and industrial applications, can and should be inspected and recharged yearly. You'll often see a gauge on those models, which reflects the pressure levels. Smaller home models are generally sealed in a fashion that makes them (as noted earlier) more expensive to recharge, if even possible, than to replace. By our kitchen, we have a medium-size one that has a pressure gauge and is rechargeable.

MyopicJoe
October 19th, 2008, 11:09 AM
As far as what to do with older extinguishers you want to throw away, practice with the old one. Yes. Teach your kids how it is used and use it.

Oh that's a good idea, Asuhoru. Hands on experience will give them valuable confidence.



If it CAN be recharged, you can try Safety Systems in Kalihi on Waikamilo, or you can try Pacific Fire Protection and Oahu Fire Protection out in the Pearl City Industrial park.

I guess I won't need a recharge, but I appreciate the specific recommendations, DiverDown.



Sometimes old extinguishers are used to help train people how to use them. It's not as simple as you might think, especially if it's an oil or gasoline-fed fire. I put out a couple of vehicle engine fires and a small fire in a Chinese restaurant. The toughest was the car fire. The engine compartment is full of little nooks and crannies that kept re-igniting the fire. The best was halon, but that's now outlawed. The next option would be CO2, but they're heavy.

I've never had to put fire (knock on wood). Thanks for sharing your experiences, Composite. Pretty interesting.



(Of course, I thought the acronym meant Panic And Save Self... :p)

Haha, that version works for me!



You're thinking of: Pull Aim Squeeze Sweep, then Get Away Swiftly.... PASS GAS. :D

Doh! xD