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Pomai
February 6th, 2010, 05:06 PM
A news article was published today about Hasbro's new Pink Ouija Board that's "targeting young girls", which is riling critics (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,584998,00.html?test=latestnews).


It's designed for young girls ages 8 and older, but some say the mysterious product is a "dangerous spiritual game" that opens up anyone, particularly Christians, to attacks on their soul.

Personally I've always been apprehensive to try this game, ever since being freaked out by it as a young kid when I seen how it worked in the film 'The Exorcist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Exorcist_(film))'. Remember 'Captain Howdy (http://www.museumoftalkingboards.com/Film.html)'? :eek:

Ironically, this past week's episode of Ghost Whisperer (http://www.tvsquad.com/2010/02/06/review-ghost-whisperer-dead-to-me/) featured the Ouija Board as a "communication tool" between a dead young girl and an Anthropology Professor played by Margaret Cho.

Just curious if any of you out there in HT land have played or experimented with the Ouija Board game, and have you ever had any, ehem, supernatural or spiritual "experiences" from it? Or did it "tell" you something while "playing" it that absolutely FREAKED YOU OUT?

I don't think I ever want to try it. And I'm Buddhist (regardless of whether that matters or not).

tutusue
February 6th, 2010, 05:33 PM
Spent way too many hours on the Ouija board both as a child and as an adult. I was raised with one in the house. My mom and I used to use it all the time. It ended up being a communication tool with my grandmother after she passed away in 1954.

For some, unknown reason (:rolleyes:), as a child I really wanted a brother or sister. A few months after my grandmother died I ask good ol' Ouija if my dream would ever come true. YES, said Ouija! When and what?, I asked. A boy in October 1956. Yah! Right! 1956 rolls around, I'm now almost 12 (and an only child) when my parents announce I'm going to be a sister in December. Close, but it's still not October! October 28 rolls around and my mom delivers a premature baby brother!

When I got married (1964), I really missed having my grandma there. Later that year, mom and I were on the Ouija board once again when I asked Granny if she, somehow, saw me get married. "Yes. I was a daisy in your bouquet." My bouquet was, indeed, all daisies! I'm the only bride I know who chose a daisy bouquet. Ha...I carried Granny down the aisle!

I know people who are terrified of the Ouija board. Why, I don't know. Still, my experience is you get back what you put out. If you're fearful, your fears will be confirmed.

I haven't been near a Ouija in probably 20 years...and for no particular reason. Well, it was addicting...much like HT and Facebook!

Frankie's Market
February 6th, 2010, 05:44 PM
Not interested at all in the occult. The one time I actually used a ouija board was at a sleepover at my neighbor's house when I was 12. I asked the board what year I would die, which I guess is one of those questions you aren't supposed to ask. Me and the boys started moving that pointer thing around. It paused at 2. Then 0. Then the pointer started going all over the board for awhile, finally landing on "Good Bye."

So my life will end sometime in the 21st century. Thanks a lot, spirits. I couldn't have figured that one out without your help. :rolleyes:

Ron Whitfield
February 6th, 2010, 07:54 PM
Made the mistake of convening a Ouija session in a church, once...

Kaonohi
February 6th, 2010, 08:28 PM
Tried the Ouija board when I was a teen. I never got any comprehensible answers from it.

After I started meditating seriously in the 70's, I had all kinds of spiritual experiences and contacts - all without the board. I guess you just have to be tuned in.

mel
February 6th, 2010, 09:44 PM
My sister has one and I think I tried it with her more than 20 years ago. Last I heard the thing was in storage somewhere. Is it bad luck to toss one of these things in the trash? Have any of you disposed of an Ouija board? What is the best way to do it?

Pomai
February 7th, 2010, 07:02 AM
My mom and I used to use it all the time. It ended up being a communication tool with my grandmother after she passed away in 1954.Wow. Just wow. Thanks for sharing that amazing history of you using it and how it actually worked for you. Very, very interesting!

Yet that's more the reason I'm reluctant to "play" or "use" this "game". Now if they made one in the color BLUE (not pink), then maybe I may consider it! :D

I see in the Wikipedia article on Ouija (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ouija), it mentions a Japanese version known as "Savios Board", where there's a Japanese horror movie based on that called 'Kokkuri-san (http://www.videosurf.com/video/kokkuri-asia-visionfilms-com-85267778)'.


Made the mistake of convening a Ouija session in a church, once...
I suppose communicating with the dead, demons or the Devil himself in the house of God isn't the smartest thing to do (based on Christian belief of it (http://www.evangelicaloutreach.org/ouija.htm)).

Ron Whitfield
February 7th, 2010, 07:19 AM
I suppose communicating with the dead, demons or the Devil himself in the house of God isn't the smartest thing to do.We didn't even get that far!
I wonder what the church folk did with the board when they found it, or how they disposed of it?

Pomai
February 7th, 2010, 07:25 AM
We didn't even get that far!
I wonder what the church folk did with the board when they found it, or how they disposed of it?I wonder what would happen if they sprinkled Holy Water on it? Think it would erupt into a violent ball of fire?

Ron Whitfield
February 7th, 2010, 07:36 AM
Ha! We even considered getting/bringing some, just in case...

But, there was fire, on our tails as we flew out the windows!

Leo Lakio
February 7th, 2010, 08:35 AM
I always liked the name: YesYes. ("Oui" + "Ja," in French and German respectively.) Beyond that, I always had fun manipulating it just enough to freak other players out, something I've done in many aspects of life.

Remember - the word "gullible" is not listed in most dictionaries. ;)

tutusue
February 7th, 2010, 09:22 AM
[...]Is it bad luck to toss one of these things in the trash? Have any of you disposed of an Ouija board? What is the best way to do it?
How about donating it to a thrift store?

Wow. Just wow. Thanks for sharing that amazing history of you using it and how it actually worked for you. Very, very interesting![...]
My grandma experienced and participated in paranormal activities; nothing demon-like or illegal...more super-natural. My dad was raised with a Ouija Board in the house as was I. We had no fear, bad experiences or superstitions about it. Growing up, my friends and their families played Monopoly. My family and I whiled away our spare time with the Ouija! It was second nature.

mel
February 7th, 2010, 09:36 AM
How about donating it to a thrift store?

That's an idea, or now that I think about perhaps sell it on Craigslist.

Ron Whitfield
February 7th, 2010, 10:22 AM
I always had fun manipulating it just enough to freak other players out, the word "gullible" is not listed in most dictionaries.There IS something about it. Mine worked for real, until I lost the needle/pointer. Never worked again...

Pomai
February 7th, 2010, 11:10 AM
How about donating it to a thrift store?
As long as that thrift store's name isn't 'Needful Things (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0107665/plotsummary)'. :eek: That was a pretty good Stephen King movie. I enjoyed it.


My grandma experienced and participated in paranormal activities; nothing demon-like or illegal...more super-natural. They say some people have this ability as a "gift". I don't have it, that's for sure. Haven't even seen a "ghost" or apparition in my lifetime, and I hope it stays that way, thank you very much.

My late aunt had that "gift" of seeing spirits. She knew what they looked like as they sat in chairs at her house. Sometimes my mother would be there talking to her, and suddenly she'd be yelling at "someone" (who mom couldn't see) to "Go away! Go away! You don't belong here!". A real live "Ghost Whisperer" if you will. Chicken skin 'kine stuff!

I think for people who do have this supernatural "gift", the use of a Ouija board for them would be extra "dangerous", making them significantly more vulnerable to spiritual attacks. Correct me if I'm wrong on that.

Kaonohi
February 7th, 2010, 11:42 AM
They say some people have this ability as a "gift".
I don't have it, that's for sure. Haven't even seen a "ghost" or apparition in my lifetime, and I hope it stays that way, thank you very much.

I think for people who do have this supernatural "gift", the use of a Ouija board for them would be extra "dangerous", making them significantly more vulnerable to spiritual attacks. Correct me if I'm wrong on that.
I believe you are wrong.
Looks like "True Confessions" time.

If this is going to freak you out, time to skip to the next message....

My maternal grandfather used to take us out in his wooded backyard (which is now covered over by I-95) to teach us about nature. He would whistle into the trees and the birds would come and sit on his shoulders. My older sister said he did much more, to the point of teaching her things about working with nature spirits.

I was always interested in things 'psychic,' and occasionally had experiences I could not explain or understand, which was fuel for the fire.

In the 1970's I started seriously meditating, and expanded my sensitivity to things which people call 'paranormal,' (but which I think are just normal things that are poorly understood because of their relative rarity).

In 1975, at the University of Connecticut at Storrs, I was hooked up to an EEG to record my brainwaves while meditating. I was able to slow my brainwaves to 3 cps and remain awake and aware, even talking. At that frequency most people are deep asleep. The researchers didn't now what to make of it, it undermined what they had been taught.

I have had several detailed prophetic dreams (all mundane - nothing earth-shaking, but exact in critical, unknowable details), I've dabbled in remote viewing (aka astral projection) using double-blind verification. I have encountered disembodied consciousnesses - two voices talking in present tense regarding me, and have seen energy fields that another person identified as her "spirit guides."

And more.

So I guess I have this "ability" to some degree, and I never found the Ouija board dangerous or even special. FWIW.

K~~~~

tutusue
February 7th, 2010, 12:14 PM
[...]
If this is going to freak you out, time to skip to the next message....[...]
Nope...my message will freak 'em out, too!

[...]
They say some people have this ability as a "gift". I don't have it, that's for sure. Haven't even seen a "ghost" or apparition in my lifetime, and I hope it stays that way, thank you very much[...].
I bought a home in the '80s and the seller told me the ghost of the owner from decades previous resided in the attic. She told me this after we'd gotten to know each other a bit! Said ghost supposedly spent his/her time in a rocking chair and, on occasion, the rocking could be heard! Seller was told that by the seller she bought from! The room that the ghost resided above was to be my daughter's bedroom. Needless to say, I didn't tell her anything! Sure 'nuff...one morning Michele told me she kept hearing noises in the attic that night...like a squeaky rocking chair! :eek: I asked her if it seemed scary to her. It didn't and we didn't speak of it again...'til long after I sold that house!

The noises in the attic escalated after I listed the house to move to a condo. Loud noises. Sounded like throwing boxes around. I finally brought a psychic to the property who told me that the 'spirit' spent most of the time in the large banyan tree on the property and was afraid the tree was going to be cut down and the house razed. The spirit was rebelling to catch my attention. It worked! No way, I said, as I would never sell to anyone who would do that. The tree was beautiful and the house was one of those wonderful, old Kahala cottages. First offer on the house asked, as a contingency, that I have the tree cut down at my expense. I refused and the deal fell thru because of it. The spirit noise calmed down for awhile then started up again.

Second offer came in from someone who really appreciated the property just as it was. There was no financing contingency in the offer and financing fell thru. The buyer needed to quickly sell the property while he and I were still in escrow. The noise in the attic was keeping me awake by now. The new sale happened and the new buyer ended up cutting down the tree AND razing the house. I was horrified even tho' I knew I honored my own wishes to not sell to someone who would destroy the property. Evidently the spirit saw this coming all along and the new buyer (who bought from my buyer, not me) built a stucco palace on the now tree-free property, then ended up in foreclosure, bankruptcy and moving to the mainland. You be the judge!

I think for people who do have this supernatural "gift", the use of a Ouija board for them would be extra "dangerous", making them significantly more vulnerable to spiritual attacks. Correct me if I'm wrong on that.
I have a different take on this. For me, it was obvious when a negative spirit tried to break thru the board. But, for the most part, the positive spirits ruled the board. As soon as I detected the start of a negative message I'd acknowledge it then deny it's presence. Then I'd shut down the board for awhile. Spirit attacks were never a big deal, probably 'cuz my grandma was hovering around me giving 'em whack whacks! :D

acousticlady
February 8th, 2010, 03:47 AM
You know it's time to reply when a topic runs through your mind long after you've stopped reading it.

Part of the reason I decided to study physics was to see if all this stuff could be true. What I have discovered is that in many ways, it is absolutely possible! Our thoughts (each and every one) live forever. Even astral projection is a very real possibility. I'm not going to get into all the technical stuff - cause all that seems to get me is to be put on everyone's ignore lists - but let's just say that yes, I do believe you can communicate in ways that don't include the eyes and ears. And yes, I do believe in things like communicating through ouija boards and automatic writing.

Ironically, the thing that the study of physics did cause me not to believe in was the existence of a single supreme being. (I realize that many here believe otherwise - no offense meant, just talking about what I believe). It is much more likely that we were designed and dropped here by an alien race. I'm just saying.......

Pomai
February 8th, 2010, 06:13 AM
I do believe you can communicate in ways that don't include the eyes and ears. And yes, I do believe in things like communicating through ouija boards and automatic writing.There's a few companies out there with games and other interactive devices that use your BRAINWAVES to control them, with so far limited usefulness, although entertaining (albeit headache-inducing) as a novelty I suppose. See a number of them here (http://boingboing.net/2009/10/30/brainwave-toys-are-b.html).

Perhaps a "touchless" brainwave-controlled Ouija Board game may be in the works?

Speaking of Astral Travel, while not the same, I remember listening to a tape recording of an Art Bell show, where his guest was an expert in the practice of Technical Remote Viewing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remote_viewing) (TRV). He mentioned how TRV experts were hired by the NTSB to find the cause of the TWA Flight 800 crash. And also how TRV is used to communicate with the "Greys" (aliens). Interesting stuff.

Ron Whitfield
February 8th, 2010, 06:40 AM
I remember listening to a tape recording of an Art Bell show, where his guest was an expert in the practice of Technical Remote Viewing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remote_viewing) (TRV).If that was Maj. Ed Dames, forget him, he's been discredited too often.

Leo Lakio
February 8th, 2010, 08:49 AM
Part of the reason I decided to study physics was to see if all this stuff could be true. What I have discovered is that in many ways, it is absolutely possible! Our thoughts (each and every one) live forever. Even astral projection is a very real possibility. I'm not going to get into all the technical stuff - cause all that seems to get me is to be put on everyone's ignore lists - but let's just say that yes, I do believe you can communicate in ways that don't include the eyes and ears. And yes, I do believe in things like communicating through ouija boards and automatic writing.Thanks for that perspective, acousticlady.

I agree that we can control things in subtle and challenging-to-measure ways. Similar to something Kaonohi was discussing earlier, I took a college course in biomechanics. During one testing session, witnessed by a roomful of instructors at the University of Iowa, I was able to "manipulate" the readouts on several pieces of equipment monitoring vital signs - getting them to move from one end of their scale to another, through concentrated mental effort. The most astounding one was when I was hooked up to two heart-rate monitors; I got one to show my heart-rate changing from approximately 25 bpm to about 140 bpm --- while the other one kept steady at around 72-75 bpm.

If you can do that (and I'm sure there are many who can), you can easily get a Ouija board to say whatever you want it to say, without others perceiving how you do it.

But using it to get messages "from beyond?" Sorry, that's where I shift to skepticism. (Clarity: acousticlady didn't say this, but others did.)

Remind me to show you how I can make the pupils of my eyes shrink and enlarge while I stare at ya; that's kinda freaky, too.

Kaonohi
February 8th, 2010, 10:02 AM
I agree that we can control things in subtle and challenging-to-measure ways.
[...]
I was able to "manipulate" the readouts on several pieces of equipment monitoring vital signs
[...]
But using it to get messages "from beyond?" Sorry, that's where I shift to skepticism.
[...]
Remind me to show you how I can make the pupils of my eyes shrink and enlarge while I stare at ya; that's kinda freaky, too.
We have a lot more control over our bodies than we allow. Leo seems to be a natural (most of us have to practice a lot!), and also seems he's got a lot of 'heart.' :rolleyes: (or maybe just two?)

This is basically the mind controlling the brain which controls the body. Some people can wiggle their ears, others can learn how, perhaps some can't.

As far as PSI goes (messages "from beyond?"), true skepticism is healthy. (By this I mean that one does not blindly believe everything one hears, as opposed to cynicism, where one blindly disbelieves anything not proven by their standards.)

There's a lot of evidence and not enough research into this field, which is hardly 50 years old. Research is blocked by scientists who feel it threatens their premises as well as religious attitudes that PSI is 'from the devil' or some such.

I recommend the film: "Something Unknown is doing We Don't Know What...." (http://www.somethingunknown.com/blog.php?article=publicitysu) for a good overview of the science behind the PSI. (PSI being an overall term that covers what has previously been called 'paranormal;' it seems like it's time to throw out the 'para' and realize these things are normal, but not yet well understood.)

We have a lot to learn, and as with any research we must not jump to conclusions, but neither must we reject any data without due cause. Already there are too many amateurs (non-scientists) who for whatever reason are quick to discredit PSI for silly reasons such as "It could have been faked."

It's like we shouldn't make assumptions either way - pro or con. I have faith that continued research will answer these questions for us - as long as we allow it.

Leo Lakio
February 8th, 2010, 10:27 AM
There's a lot of evidence and not enough research into this field, which is hardly 50 years old.I certainly agree with that statement as well. We don't have definitive answers one way or another, so let the research continue.

Just like religious faith. We don't have definitive answers, but too many people insist that their way of believing is the "truth."

craigwatanabe
February 8th, 2010, 10:36 AM
I certainly agree with that statement as well. We don't have definitive answers one way or another, so let the research continue.

Just like religious faith. We don't have definitive answers, but too many people insist that their way of believing is the "truth."

Just as Darwinians insist their way of believing is the "truth" as well and dare to insist their way to be the only way to be taught in a classroom.

Kungpao
February 8th, 2010, 10:46 AM
I had a board when I was younger. Back then, things we saw and heard in our daily lives influenced what or who we encountered through the board. Good/Bad, didn't matter. I always felt that I could never really take anything seriously that said "Parker Brothers" right across the front of the thing :D We took it less seriously when my dog ate part of the pointer.

Eventually, the board went on to become the base of a diorama that I put together for a H.S. Speech class. My subject: Seatbelt safety. The diorama, a scene in which a jeep slammed into a bus therefore ejecting it's passengers for which I used pipe cleaners to depict the flightpath of the passengers as they ejected from the jeep.:eek:

Leo Lakio
February 8th, 2010, 12:14 PM
Just as Darwinians insist their way of believing is the "truth" as well and dare to insist their way to be the only way to be taught in a classroom.“Today, the theory of evolution is an accepted fact for everyone but a fundamentalist minority, whose objections are based not on reasoning but on doctrinaire adherence to religious principles.” - James D. Watson, co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, Nobel Prize recipient

Kaonohi
February 8th, 2010, 01:00 PM
If anyone out there has the pure absolute Truth (with a capital T) and can prove it without using the words of others (instead of their own) to back it up, please stand.

Everyone else sit, and we can discuss our OPINIONS!

We think we are so smart, but we are yet infants in a complicated, surprising world.

K\

Peshkwe
February 8th, 2010, 01:37 PM
When I was 13 I had a sleep over with a bunch of girlfriends. Yagoda brought over her Ouija and we played with it asking all the silly questions we could think of. I asked what would my future husband's name be...the planchette spelled out 'Sanford'. Of course I got hassled by everyone 'cause 'Sanford and Son' was one of the top shows at the time.

Segway to me at 18 and in the Air Force...I meet a guy 10 years older than me and we become friends and then hook up, we're still married to this day 30+ years later.

His name is Sandy....short for Sanford.

Leo Lakio
February 8th, 2010, 02:03 PM
If anyone out there has the pure absolute Truth (with a capital T) and can prove it without using the words of others (instead of their own) to back it up, please stand.Neither Craig nor I would claim to know any truth that applies to anyone outside ourselves. At least, I think that's so - Craig can speak clearly for himself, and doesn't need me to do so.

Ron Whitfield
February 8th, 2010, 02:05 PM
His name is Sandy....short for Sanford.oooooWEEEEEooooooo! :D That was cool! So was your story...

Kaonohi
February 8th, 2010, 08:23 PM
Neither Craig nor I would claim to know any truth that applies to anyone outside ourselves. At least, I think that's so - Craig can speak clearly for himself, and doesn't need me to do so.
Typically, our experiences speak for themselves.
Our interpreations of our experiences need strong backing, personal or community, to speak out for us.

There is only one Ultimate Truth, as defined, and I believe none of us have even come close to that knowledge. Yet.

I also don't think that's any reason to stop trying to find it!

Keep on searching.

K - ***

craigwatanabe
February 9th, 2010, 11:24 AM
“Today, the theory of evolution is an accepted fact for everyone but a fundamentalist minority, whose objections are based not on reasoning but on doctrinaire adherence to religious principles.” - James D. Watson, co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, Nobel Prize recipient

So why is it that this fundamental minority represent the world's religions who are definately not in the minority especially here in the United States of America?

Kaonohi
February 9th, 2010, 12:26 PM
So why is it that this fundamental minority represent the world's religions who are definately not in the minority especially here in the United States of America?
Hmmmm. Not sure what you mean, C, so let's try this:

USA made this thing called the "Bill of Rights," the first 10 constitutional amendments. The first Amendment ensured we would have "Freedom of Religion," i.e., we could worship any way we wanted.

Of course that is a two-edged sword: not only is the State prohibited from telling us how to worship, the religions are prohibited from telling the State what to do. It's called "Separation of church and state."

They never thought to include a "separation of science and state" amendment. :D

K?

Bobinator
February 9th, 2010, 12:47 PM
Hmmmm. Not sure what you mean, C, so let's try this:

USA made this thing called the "Bill of Rights," the first 10 constitutional amendments. The first Amendment ensured we would have "Freedom of Religion," i.e., we could worship any way we wanted.

Of course that is a two-edged sword: not only is the State prohibited from telling us how to worship, the religions are prohibited from telling the State what to do. It's called "Separation of church and state."

They never thought to include a "separation of science and state" amendment. :D

K?

The "Separation of Church and State" isn't in the Constitution. It was referenced in a letter written by Thomas Jefferson to address concerns that one group of Senators or Congressmen would vote in accordance with other politicians that shared their church denomination rather than individual conviction. I think it's absurd to think that Christian leaders would not want society guided by Christian principles.

I don't want to derail this thread, so I'll close with this interesting article. You can read it if you so choose. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/987191/posts

Leo Lakio
February 9th, 2010, 02:40 PM
I think it's absurd to think that Christian leaders would not want society guided by Christian principles.Although many of America's colonial statesmen practiced Christianity, our most influential Founding Fathers broke away from traditional religious thinking. The faith of many of our Founding Fathers was deist, not theist. It was best expressed earlier in the Declaration of Independence, when they spoke of "the Laws of Nature" and of "Nature's God." Let's see what else they said, shall we?

"Question with boldness even the existence of a god." - Thomas Jefferson

"As the Government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion..." - (Article 11, Treaty of Tripoli, 1797 - signed by President John Adams.)

"The United States of America have exhibited, perhaps, the first example of governments erected on the simple principles of nature; and if men are now sufficiently enlightened to disabuse themselves of artifice, imposture, hypocrisy, and superstition, they will consider this event as an era in their history. Although the detail of the formation of the American governments is at present little known or regarded either in Europe or in America, it may hereafter become an object of curiosity. It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; it will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses." - John Adams, "A Defense of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America"

"Religion and government will both exist in greater purity, the less they are mixed together." - James Madison

Bobinator
February 9th, 2010, 03:15 PM
Although many of America's colonial statesmen practiced Christianity, our most influential Founding Fathers broke away from traditional religious thinking. The faith of many of our Founding Fathers was deist, not theist. It was best expressed earlier in the Declaration of Independence, when they spoke of "the Laws of Nature" and of "Nature's God." Let's see what else they said, shall we?

"Question with boldness even the existence of a god." - Thomas Jefferson

"As the Government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion..." - (Article 11, Treaty of Tripoli, 1797 - signed by President John Adams.)

"The United States of America have exhibited, perhaps, the first example of governments erected on the simple principles of nature; and if men are now sufficiently enlightened to disabuse themselves of artifice, imposture, hypocrisy, and superstition, they will consider this event as an era in their history. Although the detail of the formation of the American governments is at present little known or regarded either in Europe or in America, it may hereafter become an object of curiosity. It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; it will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses." - John Adams, "A Defense of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America"

"Religion and government will both exist in greater purity, the less they are mixed together." - James Madison

Leo,

I agree with all the quotes, with the exception of- "Question with boldness even the existence of a god." - Thomas Jefferson

Only because it is obviously a partial sentence, which could be taken way out of context... just like how some Christians misuse scripture.

At any rate, I don't believe anyone is saying the U.S. Government was founded on Christianity as a religion. But its believable to say it was founded on Christian principles.

Kaonohi
February 9th, 2010, 03:31 PM
I agree with all the quotes, with the exception of- "Question with boldness even the existence of a god." - Thomas Jefferson

Only because it is obviously a partial sentence, which could be taken way out of context... just like how some Christians misuse scripture.

At any rate, I don't believe anyone is saying the U.S. Government was founded on Christianity as a religion. But its believable to say it was founded on Christian principles.
Question with boldness even the existence of a god; because if there be one he must approve of the homage of reason more than that of blindfolded fear.
-Thomas Jefferson, letter to Peter Carr, August 10, 1787

Our government was founded on reasonable and mutually beneficial principles that can be found in most religions, Buddhism, paganism, even Islam!

The idea that the US is a "Christian Nation" was pushed upon our psyches by people with political agendas. Since most Americans with religious beliefs claim some form of Christianity, it's a good way to get votes.

The original Pledge of Allegiance didn't even have the words "under God" after "One nation," and "In God We Trust" wasn't always on our currency.

If you keep your church out of my government, I'll keep my government out of your church.

surlygirly
February 9th, 2010, 04:09 PM
If you keep your church out of my government, I'll keep my government out of your church.

And we can try to keep religion out of at least ONE thread that's actually interesting...;)

I've never used an actual Ouija Board. A bunch of my friends and I tried to make one at a slumber party once, but when we were cutting out the last pieces, one of the girls cut her finger really badly and bled everywhere. We took that as a sign not to continue! But I've always kind of wanted to try it just once.

Leo Lakio
February 9th, 2010, 04:15 PM
And we can try to keep religion out of at least ONE thread that's actually interesting...;)You are right, and I am sorry - as I'm the one who took it in that direction with my comment:
Just like religious faith. We don't have definitive answers, but too many people insist that their way of believing is the "truth."I was making a bigger pool out of the supernatural/spirit world aspects of Quija, based on my own attitudes about religion, and completely derailed the discussion into yet another one in which we will never find agreement; one that could go on and on and on. I won't continue in that direction, and thank you for getting it back on track so courteously, sg.

surlygirly
February 9th, 2010, 05:29 PM
Always glad to be of service! I wasn't trying to call anyone out- just noticed a lot of the threads lately have kind of taken a political/religious turn and thought maybe we could either start a thread just for that, or leave this one neutral.

Thanks, LL!

Walkoff Balk
February 9th, 2010, 06:19 PM
Was it an urban legend or in a movie where you can hear spirits screaming when an Ouija board is burning?

cyleet99
February 9th, 2010, 08:39 PM
I think it's myth...mentioned in several places on the web.

FWIW, the Wikipedia article about these "talking boards" is pretty interesting. I played on one with friends in early teen years, but I did not believe any of it and don't remember any of the answers.

Ron Whitfield
February 10th, 2010, 08:07 AM
And we can try to keep religion out of at least ONE thread that's actually interesting?You can try, but the topics so closly parallel that it's bound to come up.
If the board works, for whatever reason/s, then it upends a lot of religeous ferver. Can you say tizzy?

salmoned
February 10th, 2010, 10:19 AM
Yes, yes, and yes. 'nuff said.

Kaonohi - "...and I believe none of us have even come close to that knowledge. Yet." Wrong, oh so wrong.

Bobinator - "But its believable to say it was founded on Christian principles." Believable, maybe, but true? Nope.

Bobinator
February 10th, 2010, 11:11 AM
Yes, yes, and yes. 'nuff said.

Kaonohi - "...and I believe none of us have even come close to that knowledge. Yet." Wrong, oh so wrong.

Bobinator - "But its believable to say it was founded on Christian principles." Believable, maybe, but true? Nope.

The Church came over a thousand years before our government, so Leo can move to Communist China if he wants. Seems like it would suit him better. They don't have God in any part of their government.

I dare you to say the Nation of Hawaii movement is not founded on principles of Hawaiiana.

What part of the 10 Commandments is not agreeable with the Constitution?

Bobinator
February 10th, 2010, 11:13 AM
Was it an urban legend or in a movie where you can hear spirits screaming when an Ouija board is burning?

I observed that Ouija Boards come in different strength levels. Some are quite active, while others are sort of dull. I don't play with them, but have a looong time ago. Spirits aren't subject to the physical plain, so I'm of the opinion that the screaming thing is bogus. Notwithstanding, I've heard stories of them resisting being disposed of. Heard the same thing about some dolls too. Yikes!

Leo Lakio
February 10th, 2010, 06:54 PM
I won't continue in that direction......but I can't be responsible for others who stay off the track; again, sorry.

craigwatanabe
February 11th, 2010, 10:55 AM
soooooo......whadda you think about the Saints! :D

Peshkwe
February 11th, 2010, 11:23 AM
soooooo......whadda you think about the Saints! :D


ST Boniface of Mainz was kinda cool...patron saint of beer brewers and tailors/suit makers.

I mean what could be cooler for a night out, beer goggles and snappy dressing.

Leo Lakio
February 11th, 2010, 01:46 PM
soooooo......whadda you think about the Saints! :D


ST Boniface of Mainz was kinda cool...patron saint of beer brewers and tailors/suit makers.

I mean what could be cooler for a night out, beer goggles and snappy dressing.

Oh, you guys! Stop talking religion! :p

surlygirly
February 12th, 2010, 01:39 AM
Our 6th grade science teacher told our class that she and some friends were playing with The Board and they asked it they names of the guys they were going to marry. She got a very unusual name in response. Well, she ended up married to a guy with a name like Bob or something, but a few weeks after their wedding, found out he had been adopted and his birth mother had named him the unusual name! :eek: (And she had never told him the Ouija Board story!)

Anyone else got any good stories?

cezanne
February 21st, 2010, 07:20 PM
I'll take Magic 8-Ball (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_8-Ball) for the win!
;)

surlygirly
February 22nd, 2010, 04:50 PM
I'll take Magic 8-Ball (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_8-Ball) for the win!
;)

Oh no! That's how I ended up married the first time. Bad, bad Magic 8-Ball!