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Kaonohi
August 8th, 2010, 07:44 PM
I have a volunteer tree coming up among my snowbushes. I don't know whether to move it or cut it. I've tried the standard reference books, to no avail.

Anyone recognize it????

Kaonohi

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo132/Kaonohi_photos/tree.jpg

Adri
August 8th, 2010, 09:28 PM
I'm trying to recall the name of the tree but I recommend killing it rather than transplanting it. It has been used on parkways along Hawaii streets. It has a lot of berries that scatter and grow quickly into trees and the roots go deep.

Kaonohi
August 9th, 2010, 02:18 PM
Thanks, Adri.

Someone mentioned it might be a "Tree of Heaven," but I compared an online leaf image with this, and it's different.

Note the attached leaf detail; the leaflets have a supporting structure on the stem lacking in the former. I've done a lot of online searching to no avail. Next stop Dept of Ag.

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo132/Kaonohi_photos/leaf.jpg

matapule
August 10th, 2010, 04:59 AM
This is definitly not Ailanthus altissima - Tree of Heaven. Ailanthus has leaflets that are arranged opposite along the rachis while the photo above has alternate leaflets. I am having trouble identifying this particular plant. Probably something unique to Hawaii's microclimate.

Honoruru
August 10th, 2010, 05:22 PM
It’s a fern tree Filicium decipiens (http://www.hear.org/starr/images/species/?q=filicium+decipiens&o=plants). Just google “Filicium decipiens” and you’ll get more info. It’s a common street tree (whatever that means), and I think Adri’s correct: birds love the berries and it spreads rapidly.

Adri
August 10th, 2010, 05:49 PM
Yes, that's what it is! I was told it was an Australian fern tree but when I checked, the australian fern tree is hapu'u and that isn't the same as the tree pictured.

Kaonohi
August 11th, 2010, 03:44 PM
It’s a fern tree Filicium decipiens (http://www.hear.org/starr/images/species/?q=filicium+decipiens&o=plants). Just google “Filicium decipiens” and you’ll get more info. It’s a common street tree (whatever that means), and I think Adri’s correct: birds love the berries and it spreads rapidly.
THANK YOU, Honoruru! You stay no ka `oi!

Right on, you got it. Now, do I kill or transplant?

HT is better and faster that UH (who I asked) and DOA (who I asked).
No wonder I come here (home) first.

LONG LIVE HAWAI`I THREADS!

Amati
August 12th, 2010, 03:32 PM
http://annstropics.com/Descriptions/Filicium_decipiens-Japanese_Fern_Tree.html
Filicium decipiens - Japanese Fern Tree


This tree is extremely desirable for two reasons: First its symmetry is almost perfect, and second, the density of the leaves make it a great shade tree. The symmetry is natural, and requires virtually no trimming to maintain. The only trimming that a person may want to do is to remove some of the lower branches. The goal would be to create a space under the tree with enough height to place lawn chairs, allowing you to take advantage of the marvelous, cool shade the tree provides.
The Japanese Fern Tree is a fairly slow grower, reaching a top size of 35 feet by 35 feet. It is evergreen, and will tolerate almost any soil conditions. Moisture requirement are average, and it is draught tolerant after it becomes established.Sounds like a nice tree, if located in an area that can accommodate a 35 foot wide and 35 foot tall tree.

Kaonohi
August 13th, 2010, 02:47 PM
http://annstropics.com/Descriptions/Filicium_decipiens-Japanese_Fern_Tree.html
Filicium decipiens - Japanese Fern Tree

Sounds like a nice tree, if located in an area that can accommodate a 35 foot wide and 35 foot tall tree.

My friends at Kraus said:
[quote
Ed,
Definitely do not transplant it, but destroy it instead. If you move it somewhere else it will just continue to spread from its seeds.
Regards,
Fred Kraus[/quote]

It spreads rapidly via bird-carried berries, and quickly takes over un-mowed areas. Not for my acre..... thanks for the suggestion - I'd rather do shower trees or monkeypods.