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glossyp
January 2nd, 2005, 10:39 AM
I'm making malasadas for the first time and my question is this:

Should the dough be very soft and wet?

Is dropping the dough into the oil with a spoon the best method?

The recipe I'm using gives a range of flour to use but doesn't say how wet it should be. It also says to drop by teaspoon but won't that make mini-malasadas?

Thanks for any and all answers! :)

kimo55
January 2nd, 2005, 10:46 AM
Is dropping the dough into the oil with a spoon the best method?
Thanks for any and all answers! :)


use a catapult.

1stwahine
January 2nd, 2005, 03:06 PM
tablespoon, make sure the oil is really hot! Be caeful...don't forget to roll um in sugar!

808_m3
January 2nd, 2005, 03:25 PM
Wet? You mean wet with water? If so, I would make sure there's not too much water otherwise it will spatter when you dip them into the hot oil.

Also, depending on your fryer, I try to shape the malasadas a little on the thin side, otherwise, if your fryer is too hot, you'll have burnt malasadas that are raw in the inside.... :(

Actually, what works pretty good is using Pillsbury biscuit mix (http://www.pillsbury.com/View/breads/pillsbury_biscuits.asp) at your supermarket's refrigerator section. I fry these guys up and they taste pretty close to malasadas. Don't forget the sugar!

Serenity
January 2nd, 2005, 06:07 PM
Glossyp....
Hope this recipe link helps.....

Malasada Recipe (http://food4.epicurious.com/HyperNews/get/archive_swap12801-12900/12832/1.html)

Godd Luck. :)

Miulang
January 2nd, 2005, 08:20 PM
In the Alohaworld Ono Recipes website, there are 4 recipes for malasadas (2 use the Pillsbury Dough method), and the other 2 are "from scratch".

Using a tablespoon to drop the dough into the hot oil will give you malasadas that are about 2 bites big; the yeast in the dough will make the malasadas puff up. Malasadas are the Portuguese version of beignets, which are a big deal in New Orleans.

Miulang

http://alohaworld.com/ono/viewrecipe.php?id=1052237938
http://alohaworld.com/ono/viewrecipe.php?id=1096952448
http://alohaworld.com/ono/viewrecipe.php?id=1096952448
http://alohaworld.com/ono/viewrecipe.php?id=1097031891

1stwahine
January 2nd, 2005, 08:30 PM
I always use a tablespoon and it's no way two bites BIG!

Miulang
January 2nd, 2005, 08:55 PM
I always use a tablespoon and it's no way two bites BIG!
What kine tablespoon you use? One soup tablespoon or one measuring spoon tablespoon? Make difference, you know.

Miulang

cezanne
January 2nd, 2005, 09:08 PM
What kine tablespoon you use? One soup tablespoon or one measuring spoon tablespoon? Make difference, you know.

Miulang
LOL! :D

We did a fundraiser where you get the batter, shortening, sugar, etc. Cooking temp of oil was 350 degrees and we used an ice cream scoop for the batter.

Miulang
January 2nd, 2005, 09:15 PM
LOL! :D

We did a fundraiser where you get the batter, shortening, sugar, etc. Cooking temp of oil was 350 degrees and we used an ice cream scoop for the batter.
What? You from Punahou? I hear dey make onolicious malasadas! ;) If you use one ice cream scoop, you going make da kine big bumbucha kine malasadas. Going take one whole day foa whack 'em up.

Miulang

cezanne
January 2nd, 2005, 09:32 PM
What? You from Punahou? I hear dey make onolicious malasadas! ;) If you use one ice cream scoop, you going make da kine big bumbucha kine malasadas. Going take one whole day foa whack 'em up.

Miulang
Well it depends on what kine ice cream scoop you talking about. haha jk.
Actually it was for church and we got the stuff from Agnes Bake Shop in Kailua. They were regular run of the mill size malasadas I guess ... hmmm about 3 inch diameter.

glossyp
January 3rd, 2005, 07:39 AM
Hey, thanks everybody for the links, advice and first hand knowledge! Here is how they turned out.

The dough (which was very sticky - I should have used that word instead of "wet") went through 2 rises and really exploded on the second rise spilling out of the bowl. Next time I'll use more flour so the dough is easier to manage. They were really yeasty tasting too a bit more than I like so I think more flour will help.

I tried teaspoons, tablespoons and the measuring spoon tablespoon but ended up using the tablespoons as the size was about right to get completely cooked without drying.

I heated the oil to 365 at first but turned down to 350 as cezanne mentioned as they were getting too brown but still gooey in the middle.

Mistake on the first batch was to let the oil drain off them before putting in sugar - my beloved came in, saw that and immediately took over the sugar rolling process insisting they must go straight to sugar from oil.

So, all in all it was fun and I'd give them a C+ or B-. Thanks for all the kind assistance! :)

Miulang
January 3rd, 2005, 08:06 AM
Hey, thanks everybody for the links, advice and first hand knowledge! Here is how they turned out.

The dough (which was very sticky - I should have used that word instead of "wet") went through 2 rises and really exploded on the second rise spilling out of the bowl. Next time I'll use more flour so the dough is easier to manage. They were really yeasty tasting too a bit more than I like so I think more flour will help.

I tried teaspoons, tablespoons and the measuring spoon tablespoon but ended up using the tablespoons as the size was about right to get completely cooked without drying.

I heated the oil to 365 at first but turned down to 350 as cezanne mentioned as they were getting too brown but still gooey in the middle.

Mistake on the first batch was to let the oil drain off them before putting in sugar - my beloved came in, saw that and immediately took over the sugar rolling process insisting they must go straight to sugar from oil.

So, all in all it was fun and I'd give them a C+ or B-. Thanks for all the kind assistance! :)
You don't have to wait for the second rise. Next time, skip that rise and fry 'em up. They'll come out just as puffy and you can grind an hour sooner!

Miulang

craigwatanabe
January 3rd, 2005, 08:35 AM
I was the Malasadas chairperson for the Kamehameha Schools Band Booster club one year and we make undoubtedly the best malasadas! Compared to Punahou...Kam can...Punahou no can :D

The secret is all in how long you let the dough rise and the use of good cooking oil at the right temperature. We use a press to cut out the right size dough (about the size of one of those KFC biscuits cut in half then let them rise to about the size of one of those KFC biscuits before you cut them in half)

To get an even deep fry, you gotta hold them down deep in the oil where it's really hot. Don't leave it in too long or else it will burn or absorb too much oil. If you leave it floating on top (like Punahou) it won't cook consistantly.

Also if you pinch and drop you get pointy and poorly uniformly shaped malasadas. If you gotta pinch, let the dough rise first then place it in the deep fryer. But if you don't let the dough rise your malasadas will have this mushy uncooked center and the outside will be too crusty.

As soon as the malasadas comes out of the deep fryer, let them drop on a clean cardboard sheet (to absorb most of the oil) flip them over and then quickly pour the sugar on top. After coating with sugar, enjoy!

Miulang
January 3rd, 2005, 08:51 AM
I was the Malasadas chairperson for the Kamehameha Schools Band Booster club one year and we make undoubtedly the best malasadas! Compared to Punahou...Kam can...Punahou no can :D

The secret is all in how long you let the dough rise and the use of good cooking oil at the right temperature. We use a press to cut out the right size dough (about the size of one of those KFC biscuits cut in half then let them rise to about the size of one of those KFC biscuits before you cut them in half)

To get an even deep fry, you gotta hold them down deep in the oil where it's really hot. Don't leave it in too long or else it will burn or absorb too much oil. If you leave it floating on top (like Punahou) it won't cook consistantly.

Also if you pinch and drop you get pointy and poorly uniformly shaped malasadas. If you gotta pinch, let the dough rise first then place it in the deep fryer. But if you don't let the dough rise your malasadas will have this mushy uncooked center and the outside will be too crusty.

As soon as the malasadas comes out of the deep fryer, let them drop on a clean cardboard sheet (to absorb most of the oil) flip them over and then quickly pour the sugar on top. After coating with sugar, enjoy!
Eh, dakine you guys make more like one doughnut dough (can be cut in a round shape). Dakine Glossyp was making was da drop kine, da kine where da dough sticky "wet" so cannot cut 'em.

Miulang

drumorgan
June 9th, 2006, 09:07 AM
Thanks for any and all answers! :)

Since my trip back this year, my kids have fallen in love with malasadas and we have tried to make them at home. Giada (Everyday Italian) has an Italian recipe for Zeppole (http://www.foodnetwork.com/food/recipes/recipe/0,1977,FOOD_9936_33170,00.html) that is pretty similar. I'm finding out that most cultures have a version of fried dough. I'm finding the key is the eggs that malasadas have.


1 vanilla bean
1/2 cup sugar, plus 3 tablespoons
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
1 stick butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup water
1 cup all-purpose flour
4 eggs
Olive oil, for frying

Cut open the vanilla bean lengthwise. Using the back of a knife, scrape along the inside of the vanilla bean to collect the seeds. Scrape vanilla bean seeds into a small bowl. Add the 1/2 cup sugar and cinnamon and stir to combine. Set aside.

In a medium saucepan combine the butter, salt, 3 tablespoons of sugar, and water over medium heat. Bring to a boil. Take pan off the heat and stir in the flour. Return pan to the heat and stir continuously until mixture forms a ball, about 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the flour mixture to a medium bowl. Using an electric hand mixer on low speed, add eggs, 1 at a time, incorporating each egg completely before adding the next. Beat until smooth. If not frying immediately, cover with plastic wrap and reserve in the refrigerator.

Meanwhile, pour enough oil into a large frying pan to reach a depth of 2 inches. Heat the oil over medium heat until a deep-fry thermometer registers 375 degrees F.

Using a small ice-cream scooper or 2 small spoons, carefully drop about a tablespoon of the dough into the hot olive oil, frying in batches. Turn the zeppole once or twice, cooking until golden and puffed up, about 5 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Toss with cinnamon-sugar. Arrange on a platter and serve immediately.