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ojosverdesdegato
September 4th, 2005, 03:14 PM
I just wanted to say "ALOHA" from Canada. I have just joined this site, and I am only just starting to get the feel of how to "get it right".
The only other site to which I belong is the CAT STEVENS web sight. I have used my same user name as I use there, so I don't get mixed up...gettin' old you see.
I love Hawaii, and will return to visit in Feb/06. I try to visit once a year or more if I can. I belong to a small Halau here in Victoria BC, but had to have my knees operated on last Feb, and only now am starting to get back into it.
I am trying to teach myself the Hawaiian language, but need a teacher for the grammer. Like some others on this site, I am a Hawaiian wannabe.

Mahalo,

Claudia

Miulang
September 4th, 2005, 04:43 PM
Welcome to HT, Green eyed Cat Claudia.

How are you learning the Hawaiian language? Hope your knees get back into shape soon. I know it's kinda hard to hula when you can't bend your knees! :)

How many people are in your halau in Victoria? Sorry for being niele. I'm fascinated when I hear about where some halaus have sprung up.

Miulang

kimo55
September 4th, 2005, 04:46 PM
Like some others on this site, I am a Hawaiian wannabe.

just one other;
newroots, as far as i can tell...

ojosverdesdegato
September 4th, 2005, 06:29 PM
Welcome to HT, Green eyed Cat Claudia.

How are you learning the Hawaiian language? Hope your knees get back into shape soon. I know it's kinda hard to hula when you can't bend your knees! :)

How many people are in your halau in Victoria? Sorry for being niele. I'm fascinated when I hear about where some halaus have sprung up.

Miulang

Thanks for the post Muilang. Believe it or not, I am learning a lot of the Hawaiian language from the music. I seem to be the only one in our Halau that is really interested in the language. I NEED to understand before I can dance. I also have a couple of Hawaiian language grammer books, and of course the dictionary. My vocabulary is getting longer, but I have trouble with the sentence structure. I have had no formal training, and it seems to me that Hawaiian doesn't use verbs.??
My first language is English of course, but I am fluent in Spanish, and as a Canadian, who trained in Ottawa, I have a "working knowlege" of French. I can understand Italian, but have a hard time speaking it...I keep slipping into the Spanish.
Our group is called the Pacific Polynesian Dancers. We are very small, and dance for private parties, and also at seniors' homes, and for special events. I have become addicted to it, and the more I learn, the more I want to know.
Aloha nui loa,
Claudia...The green eyed cat.

ojosverdesdegato
September 4th, 2005, 06:31 PM
just one other;
newroots, as far as i can tell...


Yes Kimo55....I can relate to newroots...I don't deny it.

malama pono!
Claudia

pzarquon
September 4th, 2005, 06:39 PM
I NEED to understand before I can dance. I also have a couple of Hawaiian language grammer books, and of course the dictionary. My vocabulary is getting longer, but I have trouble with the sentence structure. I have had no formal training, and it seems to me that Hawaiian doesn't use verbs.??Um. Hula is a verb.

Hula is to dance. Huli is to turn. Hele is to go. Helu is to count. Heluhelu is to read. Malama is to care. Kokua is to help.

You might want to find yourself a copy of Ka Lei Ha`aheo (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/082481259X/ref=pd_sim_6/102-8212158-0331356?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance) (a common 101 textbook - you can get it with audiotapes (http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/cart/shopcore/?db_name=uhpress&page=shop/flypage&product_id=176&category_id=b3e6237d1b1b3b8594488ed1c40d0dfb)) or `Olelo No`eau (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0910240930/qid=1125895052/sr=8-5/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i3_xgl14/102-8212158-0331356?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) for more poetic material. There's even a popular Instant Immersion Hawaiian (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1591502950/qid=1125895120/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/102-8212158-0331356?v=glance&s=books) CDROM.

Miulang
September 4th, 2005, 06:46 PM
Thanks for the post Muilang. Believe it or not, I am learning a lot of the Hawaiian language from the music. I seem to be the only one in our Halau that is really interested in the language. I NEED to understand before I can dance. I also have a couple of Hawaiian language grammer books, and of course the dictionary. My vocabulary is getting longer, but I have trouble with the sentence structure. I have had no formal training, and it seems to me that Hawaiian doesn't use verbs.??
My first language is English of course, but I am fluent in Spanish, and as a Canadian, who trained in Ottawa, I have a "working knowlege" of French. I can understand Italian, but have a hard time speaking it...I keep slipping into the Spanish.
Our group is called the Pacific Polynesian Dancers. We are very small, and dance for private parties, and also at seniors' homes, and for special events. I have become addicted to it, and the more I learn, the more I want to know.
Aloha nui loa,
Claudia...The green eyed cat.

Who is your kumu (teacher)? Is it someone who is teaching you hula tradition, too? Learning the language is one thing, but knowing why you hula is just as important. There are certain "rituals" required for "old" (Kahiko) hula. PZ suggests that Instant Immersion Hawaiian CD-ROM. If you can find it or order it (it's gonna be kinda pricey in Cdn), that's probably the best way to learn the language because you'll hear the correct pronounciation and not have to guess at it.

Miulang

ojosverdesdegato
September 4th, 2005, 06:52 PM
Um. Hula is a verb.

Hula is to dance. Huli is to turn. Hele is to go. Helu is to count. Heluhelu is to read. Malama is to care. Kokua is to help.

You might want to find yourself a copy of Ka Lei Ha`aheo (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/082481259X/ref=pd_sim_6/102-8212158-0331356?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance) (a common 101 textbook - you can get it with audiotapes (http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/cart/shopcore/?db_name=uhpress&page=shop/flypage&product_id=176&category_id=b3e6237d1b1b3b8594488ed1c40d0dfb)) or `Olelo No`eau (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0910240930/qid=1125895052/sr=8-5/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i3_xgl14/102-8212158-0331356?v=glance&s=books&n=507846) for more poetic material. There's even a popular Instant Immersion Hawaiian (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1591502950/qid=1125895120/sr=2-2/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_2/102-8212158-0331356?v=glance&s=books) CDROM.


Yes, and mahalo for your response. Yes Hula IS a verb, and I do know that huli is to turn etc. It is the congugation of the verbs that throw me. I only know English, and the "Romance" languages, which mainly use the same syntax for sentence structure. I guess I sounded a bit stupid when I said that Hawaiian has no verbs...it is the "tenses" that get me.
We are starting to do some huge renovations on our house right now, and while my knees are healing I have packed away all my Hawaiian costumes...My ever so helpful husband packed away my two grammer books. So I cannot refer to them for a couple of months.
Mahalo for your advice. Now I have an excuse to buy some new ones. Mahalo for the links.

Take care,
Claudia

ojosverdesdegato
September 4th, 2005, 07:03 PM
Who is your kumu (teacher)? Is it someone who is teaching you hula tradition, too? Learning the language is one thing, but knowing why you hula is just as important. There are certain "rituals" required for "old" (Kahiko) hula. PZ suggests that Instant Immersion Hawaiian CD-ROM. If you can find it or order it (it's gonna be kinda pricey in Cdn), that's probably the best way to learn the language because you'll hear the correct pronounciation and not have to guess at it.

Miulang

My kumu hula is a beautiful local lady, who studied Hula in Hawai'i. I do not know who her kumu was, but she teaches both kahiko and auana, and aside from ME, she is also interested in the language. The other students before I joined, were not really interested in the language, so she mainly taught the dance.
I know that Hula has very old and sacred traditions, and that is why I yearn to learn the language. I will not do a dance if it is not faithful to the meaning and sentiment of the song.
I have been trying to learn my pronounciation from the likes of Brudda IZ, and Keali'i Raechel...sorry if I misspelled his name, I don't have it in front of me.
Mahalo for the advice, and the interest you have taken.
Claudia

Miulang
September 4th, 2005, 07:08 PM
Maybe Canadian kumus are different from kumus in Hawai'i and the Mainland US, but most kumus will not teach anyone who is not also interested in learning the language and traditions of hula. She must be one of those "modern" kumus who doesn't think teaching about tradition and language will enhance the quality of the training you're getting, that it's more important to have the students. That's unfortunate. That's like going through the motions of ballet, but not being taught proper form. :(

Miulang

ojosverdesdegato
September 5th, 2005, 08:54 AM
Maybe Canadian kumus are different from kumus in Hawai'i and the Mainland US, but most kumus will not teach anyone who is not also interested in learning the language and traditions of hula. She must be one of those "modern" kumus who doesn't think teaching about tradition and language will enhance the quality of the training you're getting, that it's more important to have the students. That's unfortunate. That's like going through the motions of ballet, but not being taught proper form. :(

Miulang

Aloha Muilang;
Please do not get the wrong impression of my kumu hula. However, I am sure you are correct, that the kumu hulas in Canada are different from those of the mainland, and of Hawai'i. But in her defence, she would have no students if she taught only those who wanted to learn the language.
I mentioned that she had studied under a kumu in Hawai'i at one time, but then, her kumu was her sister-in-law, who is a Phillipina. Her name is Belle, and she is now teaching in the Orient.
My kumu is a very beautiful lady, and works full time and has two children. She is very humble and admits that she has much to learn, and when we were in Hawai'i a few years ago as a group, she did not want us to identify her as a kumu, because she was ebarrassed. I think she has a very "aloha" soul.
I agree with you 100% about the need to learn the language and the traditions, but if she were to enforce my views, I would be her only pupil. We are only a group of 7.
I have joined this site with the hope of learning more about the culture, and to communicate with exactly people like you! Remember, we are a long way from Hawai'i, and don't have the population that the US mainland has. The one thing we do have in common tho, is that Victoria is on an island. Victoria is the capital of my province, (British Columbia), and it is situated on Vancouver Island...a bit confusing to outsiders, because on "our" mainland is this province's biggest city called Vancouver.
Forgive my lengthy answer,
Claudia,
Is there a Hawaiian equivilent for my name in Hawaiian?

Miulang
September 5th, 2005, 02:18 PM
Hui Claudia:
It's great that you've been inspired to learn the language and the traditions of hula. I think that's the difference between being a "performer of hula" v. being a "practitioner of hula". If you can absorb some of the mana that comes by way of learning the traditions of hula and the Hawaiian language, then you will evolve into a "practitioner" and not just be an "entertainer". Keep up the good work. :) Someone who knows 'olelo better than me will have to try translating your name for you. I don't know what the Hawaiian equivalent for the letter "C" would be.
Miulang

Jonah K
September 5th, 2005, 02:38 PM
Hui Claudia:
It's great that you've been inspired to learn the language and the traditions of hula. I think that's the difference between being a "performer of hula" v. being a "practitioner of hula". If you can absorb some of the mana that comes by way of learning the traditions of hula and the Hawaiian language, then you will evolve into a "practitioner" and not just be an "entertainer". Keep up the good work. :) Someone who knows 'olelo better than me will have to try translating your name for you. I don't know what the Hawaiian equivalent for the letter "C" would be.
Miulang
Aloha Kakou,

"Claudia" is the feminine form of "Claude" which comes from the Latin word for "lame". 'O'opa, ki'opa, ma'ulu'ulu, and mauwa are common Hawaiian words that mean "lame". "'O'opa" is probably the closest translation for "Claudia"; however, it's better to take a little poetic license and make it something like "Ke'o'opalani". ;)

Cheers,

Jonah K

P.S. The Hawaiian equivalent for the letter "C" is the letter "K".

Miulang
September 5th, 2005, 02:42 PM
Aloha Kakou,

"Claudia" is the feminine form of "Claude" which comes from the Latin word for "lame". 'O'opa, ki'opa, ma'ulu'ulu, and mauwa are common Hawaiian words that mean "lame". "'O'opa" is probably the closest translation for "Claudia"; however, it's better to take a little poetic license and make it something like "Ke'o'opalani". ;)

Cheers,

Jonah K

P.S. The Hawaiian equivalent for the letter "C" is the letter "K".
Mahalos foa dat, Jonah. Ho da nani da name Ke'o'opalani! Maybe I go change my name to Claudia too! :D So, D and C both come out as K in Hawaiian? eh, Claudia, since you just had surgery on both your knees, the name Ke'o'opalani fits perfectly, yeah?

Miulang

ojosverdesdegato
September 6th, 2005, 10:48 AM
Aloha Kakou,

"Claudia" is the feminine form of "Claude" which comes from the Latin word for "lame". 'O'opa, ki'opa, ma'ulu'ulu, and mauwa are common Hawaiian words that mean "lame". "'O'opa" is probably the closest translation for "Claudia"; however, it's better to take a little poetic license and make it something like "Ke'o'opalani". ;)

Cheers,

Jonah K

P.S. The Hawaiian equivalent for the letter "C" is the letter "K".

Hey JonahK! Aloha, and Mahalo!
I am working an evening shift these days, so I sleep in late, and get home after midnigt, so kala mai ia'u, if I am slow to respond, but I do so appreciate your ansewers.
From the age of 11 years to 17 years, I was a boarder in The Convent of the Sacred Heart. We had to study Latin, and I was so disappointed to learn that my name meant "lame". But I was named after my father "Claude", who I adored, and for that reason I didn't mind. I also thought it a bit fitting, because for as long as I can remember, I have had knee problems. Even as a child they would lock in the flexed position, and had to be manually unlocked. My screams would shatter glass!!
However, I was very atheletic, and my last surgery was my 3rd surgery on both knees at once. The doctors are amazed that I am so mobile. This last surgery has bought me time, and I guess the next step will be full knee replacements. If I can keep my weight very low, I will add life to my knees...hence my need to get back into Hula.
As a nurse I am on my feet running sometimes 16 hours a day, so I am not doing too badly.
Sorry to get off topic, but very people seem to know that Claudia means "lame" in Latin. I am so impressed.
Thank you for the advice. I love the sound of Ke'o'opalani...Would that be something like "Heavenly lame one?" That will be my Hula name now. I am the only one in my group that hasn't got a Hawaiian name, because we just couldn't "get it right"
Mahalo again Jonah, and to all you "aloha" filled members who have welcomed me so warmly to this site. I want to use some of the Hawaiian I have taught myself, but I am a bit shy (hila-hila) to make a fool of myself.
I will try this...Remember, I have my books packed away. "Aloha au ia kakou"
Malama pono, I have heard the late Brudda Iz say that at the end of his concerts. Do I have it pono?
Claudia... Ke'o'opalani...I love the sound of words with the "glottal stop!" lol