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Bamboo Mama
October 6th, 2005, 06:51 AM
I stumbled on this site/thread while researching sweet potato dishes. Am writing a book about quilts using that neat gold/orange color and including some Sweet Potato recipes for fun. Already have pie, dumplings, sweet potato butter (like apple butter), and pound cake. Heard that sweet potatoes were popular in Hawaii-true or myth? Need two more good and unusual recipes--any advice? No mushy Thanksgiving cassaroles! Many thanks to the person who posted the recipe for sweet bread. Printed it out and will make for Christmas gifts. Except for the sugar, it's similar to Jewish egg bread. As we say on the NC coast, "Y'all stay sweet!"

Glen Miyashiro
October 6th, 2005, 08:45 AM
I stumbled on this site/thread while researching sweet potato dishes. Am writing a book about quilts using that neat gold/orange color and including some Sweet Potato recipes for fun. Already have pie, dumplings, sweet potato butter (like apple butter), and pound cake. Heard that sweet potatoes were popular in Hawaii-true or myth? Need two more good and unusual recipes--any advice? No mushy Thanksgiving cassaroles! Many thanks to the person who posted the recipe for sweet bread. Printed it out and will make for Christmas gifts. Except for the sugar, it's similar to Jewish egg bread. As we say on the NC coast, "Y'all stay sweet!"Howzit, Bamboo Mama!

Yes, ‘uala (sweet potatoes) were widely grown in old Hawai‘i and are still around today although they're not as popular as before.

If you like quilts, then you need to learn about the craft of Hawaiian quilting. New England missionaries introduced quilting to the Hawaiians in the early 1800s, but the Hawaiians took the idea and really ran with it. They're gorgeous.

Pomai
October 6th, 2005, 10:50 AM
Aloha!

You may also want to consider the Okinawan Sweet Potato, a purple variety introduced to Hawaii back when Okinawan plantation workers arrived.

OSP has a light tan outter skin with a purple inner flesh. There's also a version grown on the island of Molokai that have a brown outter skin.

While the traditional Hawaiian (yellow) variety is usually served simply steamed (luau staple dish), the Okinawan variety seems to be used more widely in Pacific Rim "fusion" dishes due to it's vibrant purple color and sweeter flavor.

I'm pretty sure you can find this variety on the east coast at any farmer's market or asian grocery store.

Here's a few suggestions...

• Okinawan Sweet Potato and Haupia Pie.. my fav'!

• Sliced thin and deep fried in Tempura batter.

• OSP potato chips.

• Incorporated with Idaho spuds in a garlic mash'. Gives it this nice light purplish color and of course, that hint of sweetness.

This is making hungry.
:rolleyes:

Hawaiian quilted pillows have been quite popular as well.

Miulang
October 6th, 2005, 12:53 PM
Here's a recipe for sweet potato mochi (http://www.recipezaar.com/136254) (mow-chee) from the Hawaiian Electric Company. It's kind of a chewy confection made with sweet rice flour, sweet potato, brown sugar, coconut milk and black sesame seeds. Sweet rice flour can be found in the Asian section of most large supermarkets around the country.

Miulang