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Pomai
October 30th, 2005, 10:42 AM
Unlike my girlfriend who has a college degree in Culinary Arts (really), I learned most of my cooking skills out of basic survival. Cooking shows such as Hawaii's Kitchen, Sam Choy's and the Food Network are also one of my greatest resources of learning.

One of the most important things to know besides basic food science and cooking methods are the TOOLS you use to prepare food.

Are you on a power trip? Does everything you use in the kitchen have to have a motor and a plug on it?

Or do you prefer doing the job by hand? Just a good 'n sharp chef's knife and a cutting board gets it done?

---------------------------------

For the most part I prefer hand jobs - my trusty J.A. Henkels 10" chef's knife and bamboo cutting board puts our plate on the table.

But what I just recently discovered is the greatness of the Electric Carving Knife! This must be one of the oldest electric kitchen appliance gadgets invented, yet I think many overlook it's abilities. Just the other day I was preparing French Dip Sandwiches, where I had cut to a London Broil into very thin pieces. The electric knife went through that thing like butter. Another advantage I've found was that the meat didn't lose as much of it's juices from cutting. In fact, hardly a drop. It all stayed where it should be.. in the meat.

Another hand tool I rely on when making Tonkotsu is the Benriner Japanese Mandalin. This is the best tool to use if you want shredded cabbage that's sliced paper thin. They're available at Daiei, Shirokiya and Marukai for about $25.00.

Another must-have powertool for me is the good 'ole blender. While I don't use it often, there are occasions when it comes in handy, like for making Pesto or milk shakes.

Another must-have for is the good 'ole electric cake mixer. I'm not a baker, but this is THE tool for making my favorite Clam Dip recipe.

My girlfriend relies on our Electric Coffee Maker (the old school 'kine with the paper filter). She doesn't care for instant.

We also have an arsenal of Haoule Koa bowls and trays for when we serve Hawaiian food to guests.

During the work week we use disposable plates and cups. Beats washing dishes. ;)

My aunt has one of those "why make coffee when you can redefine it" coffee maker gadgets. It grinds! It froths! It.. it's a pain in the okole to clean. Plus you need a damn college degree just to operate it. :eek:

1stwahine
October 30th, 2005, 11:35 AM
Hahahahahahahahaha! Put me in any kitchen Pomai, any kitchen at all.

I've cooked for small parties and for big ones just using the basics thats in a kitchen. If the person doesn't have heart or the gift of cooking...no moa common sense per se' -- no moa!

No tools will assist the wanna bee Chef! No recipes, No nothing.

It comes from the heart. It comes from within. The hell with the tools!

Improvise first and learn as the great cooks have done before you. ;) :D

Auntie Lynn

tutusue
October 30th, 2005, 01:12 PM
There are so many various styles of cooking...mine tends to be simple, short order and in bulk! A lot of what I cook gets packaged for the office freezer as I don't have the time or the inclination to go out to eat every day. That said, here's a list of my important kitchen arsenal...

George Forman grill (can't live without it...it's short order heaven!)
Blender/food processor combo (the one from Costco)...a great multi-tasker...love it for smoothies for the office fridge
mandalin with various blades
Tilia foodsaver
Isi cream whipper (can live without it...but it's a cool kitchen toy!)

Pomai
October 30th, 2005, 01:36 PM
Aunty, I totally agree about cooking from the heart. Sam Choy says that!

But you still need at least a knife to cut with. Or what you going do, just grind one whole Ribeye steak like one caveman? Savage munching action. :p

Which brings to mind another question I've asked before...

Which do you most often use:
Chopsticks?
Fork?
None of the above. I either use a shovel, bulldozer or my bare hands.

I use chopsticks more than a fork. Especially for ramen/saimin, my sustenance of choice. Eating ramen with a fork is just weird for me.

Only if it's an extravagant Euro-Western dish such as Rack of Lamb or Steak I'll use a fork. Otherwise pass the chopsticks. And the shoyu and A-1 too. :rolleyes:

1stwahine
October 30th, 2005, 01:52 PM
Aunty, I totally agree about cooking from the heart. Sam Choy says that!

But you still need at least a knife to cut with. Or what you going do, just grind one whole Ribeye steak like one caveman? Savage munching action. :p

Which brings to mind another question I've asked before...

Which do you most often use:
Chopsticks?
Fork?
None of the above. I either use a shovel, bulldozer or my bare hands.

I use chopsticks more than a fork. Especially for ramen/saimin, my sustenance of choice. Eating ramen with a fork is just weird for me.



Pomai, I neva know Sam say dat. I don't watch his show. Honest. :p
I do use a KNIFE.
As far as chopsticks, fork or none of the above.
Don't tell. I don't know how to use chopsticks! :eek:

Auntie Lynn

Erika Engle
June 4th, 2006, 11:06 AM
Okay I'm going legit, and not tacking this on to the Popeye's Chicken thread.

I found two stories for those of us for whom time in the kitchen can be recreative ... (when we have the time and ingree-da-ments). The first one is about Oahu's restaurant supply stores ... (one of them, referenced on the Popeyes thread); the other is about finding good kitchen stuff at your favorite hardware store (like the chefs often do).

Shop like a chef

http://starbulletin.com/2005/12/14/features/story01.html

Kitchen hardware (kitchen tools and alternatives you can find at the hardware store)

http://starbulletin.com/2006/01/18/features/story01.html

Linkmeister
June 4th, 2006, 01:31 PM
I've got a knife block with six reasonably good German steel knives. Also a cheapo plastic mandolin (Ai! Watch your fingers!). We've got an electric knife, but it's so old the plug doesn't stay in the handle very well. An electric can-opener, but I've got a manual for back-up.

We just gave away (to Goodwill or some outfit like that) an electric slicer (like the Hobart machines you see at delicatessens, only tabletop), because we hadn't used it in 10 years. I still have an electric skillet, because sometimes you need more frying space than the two larger burners allow.

We have an electric oven/range -- if I could change one thing about my kitchen it would be to have gas, just to speed up the heating elements.

What else? Lessee, electric juicer I never use; broken food processor which never got much use anyway but I hate to see it go into the landfill; rice cooker (of course!); and the Jenn-Air elements for the range (shish-kabob, rotisserie, deep fryer, grill racks). The Jenn-Air would get more use if it weren't such a pain to clean the grill rocks. I tend to have four burners out for a long time, then I put the grill in and leave it for a month, then go back to burners. Cyclical, that's me. :D

lavagal
June 4th, 2006, 03:14 PM
I love to cook. I have things in my kitchen I don't need, and I find myself using the same things quite often.
1. Tongs: Two of each in three different sizes for sauteing, retrieving blanched veggies, for grilling.
2. Silicone spatulas: Quite a few, again in various sizes. I like to use these when sauteing as well, or for scooping out condiments or for gently stirring things.
3. Salad spinner: When these first came out I thought they were incredible. Constantly in use.
4. Professional corkscrew remover: We bought these at Costco last year and gave one to every family member. Effortless. When it comes to wanting a glass of wine to drink or to cook, I need it and I need it NOW! This does the trick.
5. Round cutting board: I don't know why, but I have a white plastic round cutting board that I use more than any others. It's very thin and doesn't skate around.
6. Great knives: We like Wusthof. I like a good carving knife, a good chopping knife and a good bread knife. I rarely use a paring knife, but we have them.
7. Oxo good grips vegetable peeler.
8. Le Crueset Dutch Oven (big!)
9. Non-stick large skillet from Calphalon.
10. Our Weber grill (best Father's Day Gift I ever gave my husband for myself!)
11. A perpetual herb garden.

More of course, but these are the things I use just about every day.

kimo55
June 4th, 2006, 03:16 PM
I love to cook.
we'll be right over.

lavagal
June 4th, 2006, 03:25 PM
Tonight's dish will be prepared using nearly all of the aforementioned: Ratatouille.

And I bought a piece of fish with the new name: Corvina. It's actually cod and most often used for ceviche...don'tcha just love marketing?! Since I'll be sharing it with my girls, I'm either going to roast it with some tomatoes, peppers and onions or grill it.

tutusue
June 4th, 2006, 03:37 PM
And I bought a piece of fish with the new name: Corvina.[...]
During my small kid days in SoCal, corbina was a popular fish. Has the 'v' version replaced the 'b' version? Just curious as I've not heard of that fish in decades. I'm trippin' down Memory Lane! And, don't even get me started on fresh abalone!

lavagal
June 4th, 2006, 03:49 PM
During my small kid days in SoCal, corbina was a popular fish. Has the 'v' version replaced the 'b' version? Just curious as I've not heard of that fish in decades. I'm trippin' down Memory Lane! And, don't even get me started on fresh abalone!


Well, Sue the location is right, but if you go to Safeway, it's called Corvina with a v...you know I know they've done the marketing remake of other fish, although none come to mind right now. I enjoy cod, I enjoy a solid white fish. I'd prefer it dipped into beer batter, deep fried by someone else, served with a deliciously fat tarter sauce, slaw and fries, and a beer. But that's my fantasy and that ain't happenin' over here. I think those days are pretty much over for me!

tutusue
June 4th, 2006, 03:57 PM
Well, Sue the location is right, but if you go to Safeway, it's called Corvina with a v...you know I know they've done the marketing remake of other fish, although none come to mind right now.[...]
I had no idea Safeway had cor(bv)ina! The next time I'm home long enough to cook I'll have to try it. Or is it a fish they don't carry all of the time?

There's another fish Safeway carries on somewhat rare occasion and for the life of me I can't recall the name right now. It's the same color as salmon and as much as I love salmon I love this other fish even more. I wanna say red trout...but I don't think that's it. Now you have me wondering if that, too, is a marketing remake.

And, to stay on topic...
I still love my George Forman grill, mentioned earlier in this thread! :D

lavagal
June 4th, 2006, 04:26 PM
Sue:
Blaine at the Hawaii Kai Safeway fresh fish department said that the cor(bv)ina never used to get out here because it was too fragile. But now the fishermen can flash-freeze it when caught, making it possible to get here.

I've never used a George Foreman grill, but probably would if I still lived in a condo.

Is the fish you're thinking of red fleshed with silver skin like a salmon or red skinned and white fleshed like red snapper?

I've got to go pay attention to the pot on the stove!

tutusue
June 4th, 2006, 04:32 PM
I've only had cor(bv)ina that was caught the same day so I wasn't aware of the fragility issue.

And...red flesh w/silver skin! If I wasn't so lazy I'd go check my tongue in a mirror. I'm sure I'd see that fish's name on the very end of it!

Back on topic...I still really like my Isi cream whipper, too! :D

timkona
June 4th, 2006, 05:37 PM
The new kitchen store in downtown Hilo is great. The owner knows what he's talking about, and the selection is outstanding. From spatulas to chafing dishes to industrial mixers. Del-Field selections and the whole nine yards with gadgets galore.

The secrets to looking like a great chef, with as little work as possible while you party with your friends, is to prepare all the little stuff well ahead of time, and to have the right tool for the best results.

Oh, and clean as you go.

pzarquon
June 4th, 2006, 05:41 PM
Kilinahe is a kitchen gadget nut, so I'm sure she'll have a few things to say here... let's just say that when she worked in the cookware section of Liberty House (then Macy's -- where the top floor housed "The Cellar"), we were in kitchen heaven. Discounts and dealer demos are nothing to sneeze at when you're surrounded by $200 cast iron or $300 knives!

Our favorite tools would include (but are not limited to) a couple of Henckel's five-star knives (a long utility knife and a santoku -- a style Rachel Ray made popular recently, but anyone with a Japanese grandma already loved 'em), a nifty "beaker" style measuring cup (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004R92L/) (thanks, Alton Brown!), flexible silicone cutting "boards," a Kitchen-Aid mixer, some decent mixing bowls, and Circulon pans and pots in various sizes (a Macy's staple).

The Food Network has shaped many a bout of kitchen envy, so our wish list would include a really good cast iron skillet and/or grill pan, those adjustable volume based measuring cups (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002E4N70/) (another Alton favorite), the recently mentioned instant-read infra-red thermometer, the electric cutting knife Pomai has discovered, and some kind of food processor. But we know how dangerous that siren song can be... we have a very nice, very fancy kitchen scale that I think we've used exactly once!

I should also confess that we have, thanks to my grandmother, one of those as-seen-on-TV Ronco rotisserie thingamajigs. But we did use it quite a bit, so I think we got our (er, her) money's worth.

Like the article Erika linked (http://starbulletin.com/2006/01/18/features/story01.html), and also due again to Alton (our third son was very nearly named after him), we do admire folks who can improvise with common household tools and appliances. I'll pooh-pooh a lot of purchases because they're "uni-taskers." Space considerations are also significant. But I'll tell you, when we're filthy rich, I expect Kilinahe will ensure the kitchen is the biggest and nicest room in the house, and we'll have every ridiculous kitchen tool known to man!

Miulang
June 4th, 2006, 06:17 PM
My favorite kitchen tool at the moment is my Cuisinart Griddler, which replaced 2 George Forman Grills. I like the Griddler because it has removable plates that can be stuck in the dishwasher (2 sets... griddle plates and grill plates) and is multifunctional (grill/griddle/panini press) and has a very small footprint when used in the grill/panini press mode. Also in my arsenal: six 12" saute pans (my favorite cooking vessel), a set of cast iron frying pans (good for frying chicken and making Dutch Babies and tortas), a set of Henckel knives (love my Santoku!), 5 or 6 butterfly spatulas and wooden spoons, a bunch of polystyrene cutting boards and one really useful bamboo cutting board that I bought for $10, Silpat baking sheets, Kitchenaid stand mixer and Cuisinart hand mixer, 2 Cuisinart food processors (the small one I use to grind my own hamburger), a whole bunch of baking pans and a big bookcase full of cookbooks (I own many Hawaii cookbooks). Some women collect shoes and purses; I collect cookbooks! :cool:

Miulang

tutusue
June 4th, 2006, 08:28 PM
So many interesting gadgets...so little space! :( All the more reason to bring deli food home!

scrivener
June 4th, 2006, 09:29 PM
I bought myself a food processor in January (late Christmas gift) and love, love, love it. I didn't get anything fancy, just a GE model from Wal-Mart, but I have made hummus, pesto, and all kinds of soups (soup is one of my kitchen passions). I love my slow-cooker because it lets me throw all kinds of great ingredients into a pot and come home to a wonderful-smelling house and great food. I make a lot of stews and chilis in that thing, and lots of simple (but yummy) beans-and-veggies dishes.

I have burned out three hand-blenders.

One of my favorite utensils is a small pair of tongs. It lets me pick stuff up and move it around quickly and easily and it isn't so unwieldy as a normal-sized pair.

I house-sat for my folks last month, and they have a small Weber gas grill, and I quickly fell in love with it. If I had one, I wonder if I'd ever need my oven or stove again? I've seen small models at the home-improvement stores for under two hundred bucks, and I must say I'm tempted.

I have one of those little one-burner butane stoves that has come in very handy for little class projects and social events. Sukiyaki is especially nice with these butane stoves, as they allow everyone to sit around a table and participate. For larger groups, we sit at one long table with a butane stove at each end. Very fun.

Finally, while it is a uni-tasker, I am so enamoured with my "Chick-Can Rack" that I bought another and now do two chickens at a time. At the last HT picnic, I was sent to the store to pick up one of those one-time-use grills, and right next to it I found this circular rack with a space for a beer can. If you watch the Television Food Network, you have probably seen chicken roasted or grilled with a beer can stuck up into the cavity, but it's a delicate situation (as it often is when one of the parties involved has something stuck where the can goes), because you stand the chicken up on its legs and can, in kind of a tripod situation. The rack stands up by itself, though, so you can move the chicken without worrying about bad accidents. Also, sectioning the hot bird when its ready to be cut up is a piece of cake on this rack; just bend the drumettes back and you got your wings, a quick slice and gentle bend takes the thighs and drums right off, and then a few more cuts and you've got your breast filets, and the carcass is still attached to the rack. Very, very cool.

1stwahine
June 4th, 2006, 09:35 PM
Finally, while it is a uni-tasker, I am so enamoured with my "Chick-Can Rack" that I bought another and now do two chickens at a time. At the last HT picnic, I was sent to the store to pick up one of those one-time-use grills, and right next to it I found this circular rack with a space for a beer can. If you watch the Television Food Network, you have probably seen chicken roasted or grilled with a beer can stuck up into the cavity, but it's a delicate situation (as it often is when one of the parties involved has something stuck where the can goes), because you stand the chicken up on its legs and can, in kind of a tripod situation. The rack stands up by itself, though, so you can move the chicken without worrying about bad accidents. Also, sectioning the hot bird when its ready to be cut up is a piece of cake on this rack; just bend the drumettes back and you got your wings, a quick slice and gentle bend takes the thighs and drums right off, and then a few more cuts and you've got your breast filets, and the carcass is still attached to the rack. Very, very cool.

Hmmm...das why you took so long! :p

Auntie Lynn :D

scrivener
June 4th, 2006, 09:40 PM
Hmmm...das why you took so long!
Actually, the reason I took long is that the Safeway on Beretania didn't have any of those grills, so I had to go to Wal-Mart! Blame Ryan!

tutusue
June 4th, 2006, 09:42 PM
[...]Finally, while it is a uni-tasker, I am so enamoured with my "Chick-Can Rack" that I bought another and now do two chickens at a time. [...] because you stand the chicken up on its legs and can, in kind of a tripod situation. The rack stands up by itself, though, so you can move the chicken without worrying about bad accidents. [...]Very, very cool.
My youngest daughter called this "chicken up the butt"! I used a vertical poultry roaster for years with great success. The first one I purchased I saw on an infomercial! Then my kids left for school, never to return and Costco began offering roasted chicken for cheaper than I could do it. I still have that roaster. Maybe I'll try it again sometime. Hmmm...it better be sooner rather than later as I'm getting rid of my stove in favor of a convection/microwave combo.

WindwardOahuRN
June 6th, 2006, 05:57 PM
The Cuisinart Griddler is a definite favorite. Love the dishwasher-proof removable grill plates and the adjustable temp. My daughter tossed a George Foreman grill after a particularly grueling cleaning episode---her model had non-removable grills and just wouldn't part with a bunch of stuck-on junk. So, into the trash. A child after my own heart.
Also love my KitchenAid mixer. That baby can mix TONS of Christmas cookie dough without a whimper.
I still prefer to mix bread dough by hand. There is just no substitute for the human hand when it comes to kneading dough, IMHO.
Microplane for shredding parmesan cheese. Instant-read thermometer. Pastry cloth for rolling out pie crust. Mirro cookie press for great butter spritz cookies.

Pongs
June 6th, 2006, 06:36 PM
kitchen things i <3:

George Foreman All the way!! I like to put chicken drumsticks, cut up veggies nd mushrooms w/ spices wrapped in foil packet. Cooks all together and SOOOO easy to clean up.
Microplane grater....expensive but once you try it you'll never go back...so good for ginger!
Tongs....b/c i'm scared of oil splashing hehehe. THis way I can stand far away from the stove =)


Tutusue, Is the Tilia foodsaver good?

scrivener
June 6th, 2006, 06:59 PM
The Longs at Kam Shopping Center has George Foreman grills (the "champ" size, which should be called "bacholor" size) for $9.99, so I bought one last night. All I've done with it so far is make toast, since I don't have a toaster. I really like the way it's put together, though, and look forward to playing with it for the next few days.

Kelly0040
June 8th, 2006, 02:11 AM
Our favorite kitchen gadgets:

-The Egg Sandwich Toaster: Bought it off Amazon.com (free shipping!). It will toast your bread and poach an egg in 3 minutes. It also does hard-boiled eggs. I can make breakfast and do my hair in the morning at the same time. Good deal. But you have to take care of it (e.g. follow the instructions) or you ruin the nonstick surface. It's super.

-Kitchen Aid Mixer: I hauled this thing from Bakersfield to LA to Honolulu. It was a birthday gift from my mother. It was so heavy. However... We LOVE it. love love love. l o v e. love. And the rebate on it got me a free meat grinder (we were 8 days short of getting a free ice cream maker boo). Mom just bought me a spatula made specially for the mixing bowl so no curve is left untouched while scooping stuff out (but ma that's what fingers are for geez).

-Cuisinart Ice Creammaker: bought this at Costco after ordering the Kitchen Aid Ice Cream attachment on Amazon.com (after I hauled the mixer home). They basically do the same thing, but the Cuisinart machine is cheaper and the ice cream came out better than the Kitchen Aid attachment, which surprised us. Plus, it looks cool on the counter. We borrowed Alton Brown's Chocolate Ice Cream/Custard recipe and Y U M YUMYUMYUMMMMM. So thick. So yummy. Gained 12lbs.

-Mini whisk: I know my mom got this at Ross for like $2 because I saw one there not too long ago, but it's so darn handy. It's a whisk with a wooden egg as a handle. It looks absolutely stupid, but I use it daily. It sits upright on my oven. And it goes through the dishwasher beautifully - no paint chips on the egg's santa hat!

-Wusthof knives: I walked into a knife/ornamental sword store in Salem, Or., and a guy gave me an hour lecture on kitchen knives (which I previously knew nothing about). He showed me the ones I could afford (cheap ones), the ones he recommended and owned (Wusthof), and the ones that people purchased one at a time (Shun - Alton uses Shun knives!). Shun knives arent really that more expensive than Wusthof, but I love my Wusthofs a lot. I bought a cheap version of their 5' Santoku and I'm even happy with it, though I'd like to get the real one (classic version).

Spam slicer: it's so dumb, but it works so well...plus it makes a good harp when you're bored.

Flexible cutting boards: I bought a pack of 5. They're color coordinated. They have a sticky side so they dont slide around while you cut and they dont take up much storage room. I like that they bend and they make good funnels, too.

Conversion magnet: It has a bunch of measurement conversions on it and it's the heaviest magnet ever. Husband got tired of me asking all the time how many tablespoons were in a cup etc etc

Gadgets I want:
-Dutch oven
-Microplane grater: I keep asking Santa but he keeps forgetting.
-Insta-read thermometer
-Salt Cellar (I, too, love Alton! If you know where to get one locally, do share - I'm trying to avoid buying one online just cuz I know someone has to have one around here)
-Rubber mit

tutusue
June 20th, 2006, 12:56 PM
Sue:
Blaine at the Hawaii Kai Safeway fresh fish department said that the cor(bv)ina never used to get out here because it was too fragile. But now the fishermen can flash-freeze it when caught, making it possible to get here.
[...]
Safeway had cor(bv)ina on sale this past week so I bought some. OMG...deeeelish!

Trying to stay on topic: I grilled it for 5 min. on my George Foreman grill!

pzarquon
June 20th, 2006, 01:16 PM
Fun post, Kelly!

I can't believe I'd never looked up 'egg sandwich toasters (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000B18P96/)' before. What an odd, but somehow, brilliant combination! As I noted in the "What's for breakfast? (http://www.hawaiithreads.com/showthread.php?t=6787)" thread, I've gotten into the habit of making bacon and egg muffins. Something like that would simplify the process considerably!

We do love our Kitchen Aid Mixer, and covet the various attachments all the time. We're doing quite well with just the basics for now, though. Flexible cutting boards rock. And I'm glad to hear you have had great success with your ice cream maker, meanwhile. We've tried a couple, and just can't get the hang of them (though maybe it's our freezer!).

helen
June 20th, 2006, 01:29 PM
At the last HT picnic, I was sent to the store to pick up one of those one-time-use grills,
I seen those at the Market City Foodland about a week ago. Do they work pretty well?

tutusue
June 20th, 2006, 01:37 PM
[...]Tutusue, Is the Tilia foodsaver good?
Sorry for the delay, Pongs. I just saw your post today! Anyway, I really like the Tilia because I do a lot of freezing. In addition to the rolls of 'wrap' or whatever it's called, it also came with 3 canisters, all in different sizes. I love the canisters and can now buy perishables in bulk from Costco! Vacuum sealing really prolongs the life of perishables.

Pomai
June 20th, 2006, 02:11 PM
I need to buy a new triangle-shaped Musubi maker. I can't find mine. :(

I think the triangle shape facilitates a "complete Musubi experience", as each bite you're able to get have a perfect portion of rice, nori and pickled rice flavor from the Ume in the middle. It's one of those "perfect foods".

Erika Engle
June 24th, 2006, 10:00 AM
I need to buy a new triangle-shaped Musubi maker. I can't find mine. :(

I think the triangle shape facilitates a "complete Musubi experience", as each bite you're able to get have a perfect portion of rice, nori and pickled rice flavor from the Ume in the middle. It's one of those "perfect foods".
You've got two perfect tools for triangular musubi preparation -- right at the ends of your arms.
:)
The way my Nihonjin mother taught me to make musubi, you work with wet hands so the rice doesn't stick.
-You bend one hand at the "base" knuckles so your fingers are straight and your hand is bent into a 90-degree, squared "scoop."
- Put the desired amount of rice, in your hand, put your ume in the center, cover with a little rice
- With your other hand bent into the same shape and perpendicular to the rice-holding hand, squeeze and turn and squeeze and turn until your musubi reaches the desired shape and firmness.
- My mom used to sprinkle salt on her hand before putting the rice in it, and would then sprinkle the top of the rice before forming it, so the musubi would have flavor and cause a bit of salivation while eating, minimizing the need for a beverage. Nowadays with blood pressure concerns, I'm not sure she still does that. My daughter doesn't like the salted outside, so I don't make mine that way.

Instead, I often mix nori furikake, or shiso fumi furikake into the rice before forming the musubi, so the salted outside would be overkill, anyway.

Omigosh. I just flashed on mixing some grated Spam into the rice before forming ... I wonder if it would all stay together without some sort of binding ingredient? Hmm.

Pomai
June 24th, 2006, 11:43 AM
You've got two perfect tools for triangular musubi preparation -- right at the ends of your arms. ...

-You bend one hand at the "base" knuckles so your fingers are straight and your hand is bent into a 90-degree, squared "scoop." ...Erika, your post is useless without pics or a video. :p Nah, j/k. I think I understand your instructions. I'll give it a try!

Yeah, the salt definately is a requirement. I'm not so sure about that grated Spam idea. Sounds challenging, not to mention unnecessary added fat and calories. :D

For me, just a SIMPLE, salt-seasoned triangle musubi with a strip of Nori around the perimeter and Ume in the middle is all it really needs. Sometimes I pour a little of the Ume's pickling juice around the ume for added zip.

Get this: My late grandmother used to make musubi EXCLUSIVELY into round balls, which I only recently found out is only supposed to be served at funerals, as it represents a death. I guess, she not being Japanese, either wasn't aware of it or didn't believe in that. She lived until 93 so obviously it didn't effect her.

I was given a musubi mold kit once that had all kinds of shapes like a heart, clover, cylinder, etc. Stupid. I gave it away. :confused:

Erika Engle
June 25th, 2006, 03:51 PM
Would that I had video/pix to post! It woulda saved me the time of trying to figure out how to put something I take for granted into words.

At least once, my mom also made oval musubi -- flat front and back, but the shape was an elongated oval.

Anyway, you may be in luck! I was at Windward Mall today and as is my habit, I cruised Marukai for a little while. They had your triangular musubi-makers in stock for $1.49 -- each makes two at once! There's a Marukai dollar-forty-nine store (hehe) at Ward, one in Waipahu, and last I knew, one inside the Sack N Save at Stadium Mall.

I hadn't been on HT before going to WW mall or I would have looked for the other shapes you mentioned. I've seen them before, either at Marukai or at Daiei (in the dollar-store section) or perhaps both. Even though Daiei has a new owner, the dollar store is still present -- in the Kailua location, anyway.

Happy musubi-making!

Pomai
June 26th, 2006, 10:37 AM
Would that I had video/pix to post! It woulda saved me the time of trying to figure out how to put something I take for granted into words.Pictorial demo here (http://www.bob-an.com/recipe/dailyjc/hints/musubi/musubi.html)! Albeit, the pictures are thumbnail size. :confused:

Interesting how they say to use a small bowl to start the shape into a ball. I would have just shaped it in my hands, but I'll try that method.

I can't make out the final shape of that Tawara (strawbag?) Omusubi. It says to start it by forming into a log shape, but I imagine being a "strawbag", one end of it must taper?

Yeah, the triangle mold I had made two at once, with a bendable tab on the back to push the musubi out. I'll check Ward Marukai or the 99 cent ($1.49) store later today.

The most savage hand-made musubi I ever had was from Nuuanu Delicatessen (Okazuya). I swear they must have not spent more than 2 seconds forming those things. Halfway into biting into it, the rice becomes a heaping mess that just falls apart onto your plate. Other than that, they're an excellent Okazuya. ;)

craigwatanabe
June 26th, 2006, 11:02 AM
Our favorite kitchen gadgets:

-The Egg Sandwich Toaster: Bought it off Amazon.com (free shipping!). It will toast your bread and poach an egg in 3 minutes. It also does hard-boiled eggs. I can make breakfast and do my hair in the morning at the same time. Good deal. But you have to take care of it (e.g. follow the instructions) or you ruin the nonstick surface. It's super.


Yes I think you can ruin the nonstick surface if you try dry your hair in it as well. Piece of advice? Use a Hair dryer instead :D

Oh I'm sorry, you use that to keep your coffee hot!!! That's right I do the same thing :eek:

I'm sorry I had to take the bait on that one :D But seriously now, my favorite is that little one cup food processor that'll mince veggies into basically nothing so when I add it to my chili for dinner, the kids have no idea they're eating healthy stuff buried in it.

craigwatanabe
June 26th, 2006, 11:04 AM
Interesting how they say to use a small bowl to start the shape into a ball. I would have just shaped it in my hands, but I'll try that method.
;)

I think it's because the rice is hot. It's no fun making musubi out of hot rice.

Kelly0040
June 26th, 2006, 11:11 AM
CRAIG! :p

lol anyway...

No matter how hard I try, I cannot make a triangle riceball.

My friends would come over and we'd beg and beg for dad to make them (normally he'd only make them when we'd have left over rice...so maybe once a week - a riceball in my lunchbag always made my day). So, whenever I'd have a sleepover, he'd make a big pot of rice and we'd all try making them. None of us could make it into a triangle, course dad's came out perfect each time; we'd end up eating dad's and he fed ours to the dogs. I remember my dad telling me, "it's your mom's fault you cant make them" (my mom is Assyrian - like Andre Agassi! :) ).

k

tutusue
June 26th, 2006, 11:25 AM
[...]But seriously now, my favorite is that little one cup food processor that'll mince veggies into basically nothing so when I add it to my chili for dinner, the kids have no idea they're eating healthy stuff buried in it.
A friend of mine used to hide veggies in homemade, brightly colored pasta! She pureed tomatoes for red...any green veggie for green (duh!)...yellow bell peppers for yellow. Her kids loved it!

Miulang
June 26th, 2006, 11:28 AM
CRAIG! :p

lol anyway...

No matter how hard I try, I cannot make a triangle riceball.

My friends would come over and we'd beg and beg for him to make them (normally he'd only make them when we'd have left over rice...so maybe once a week - a riceball in my lunchbag always made my day). So, whenever I'd have a sleepover, he'd make a big pot of rice and we'd all try making them. None of us could make it into a triangle, course dad's came out perfect each time; we'd end up eating dad's and he fed ours to the dogs. I remember my dad telling me, "it's your mom's fault you cant make them" (my mom is Assyrian - like Andre Agassi! :) ).

k
My Mom used to have one of those plastic musubi molds too. But when she was lazy, she would take fairly hot rice, put it into a chawan and toss the rice around in the bowl to cool it off (if you roll the scoop of rice around in that bowl long enough, it does become a ball). Then she would put the rice in one hand, and she would place her other hand on top of the hand with the rice ball perpendicular to the other hand. Cupping your hands that way will allow you to make a triangle shaped musubi. Then she would wrap a half sheet of nori around the triangle and lightly compress the rice a little more. We never had problems with musubi falling apart as we were eating them! :)

craigwatanabe
June 26th, 2006, 11:43 AM
yup making triangle musubi is a talent. But never serve round musubi other than at a funeral reception. That's an old Japanese thing.

Pomai
June 26th, 2006, 01:33 PM
I think it's because the rice is hot. It's no fun making musubi out of hot rice.I usually wait until the rice has fully steamed through and cools down to just below the point of scorching hot before handling it.

As for that All-in-one Egg McMuffin machine (did I say that?), my friend has one, and the only complaint he has is that it only makes one at a time, which can take up to 10 minutes -- contrary to the manufacturer's 4 minute claim. So it's really not practical when he wants to prepare a bunch for the family. Otherwise he says they come out as good as Mikky-Deez.

I have yet to try The Foreman Grill (or its higher end Griddler (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0001XASWQ/002-9837448-4154451?v=glance&n=284507) counterpart), which seems a popular item here. While I doubt it will ever match good ole open-flame charcoal, sounds acceptable, considering the plug-and-play convenience.

Still, I'm a minimalist when it comes to plug-in appliances. God-forbid they should come out with an electric Musubi Maker. :eek: :D

Pomai
June 26th, 2006, 08:41 PM
Erika, you're right. Half the stuff in 99 cent store is now $1.49. What's the deal? lol Unfortunately neither there or Marukai Ward had any in stock at the moment.

So I ended up getting it from Daiei **ehem** I mean Don Quijote. Get this: They had it stocked in the KITCHEN GADGET aisle (relabeled) for $2.49. Then I look in the "Dollar" section near the registers and the same exact one is just a buck! So I bought two makers for less than the price of one for some serious 4-at-once Musubi mass production. :cool:

This is the exact model...
http://static.flickr.com/72/176082461_520803f714_o.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/34273299@N00/176082461/in/photostream/)

Erika Engle
June 28th, 2006, 11:21 PM
Pomai, you are a shrewd shopper and a discount diva! (And I seriously mean that as a major compliment!!!)

It's too bad you had to go to more than one store, but I guess the "find" made up for it.

Now that Pomai's got the hook-up, musubi party, anyone?

:p

kimo55
June 28th, 2006, 11:33 PM
Pomai is a cheap female Italian Opera singer?!

Pomai
June 29th, 2006, 08:50 AM
cheap female Italian Opera singer?!Theyv'e got a few of them at Macaroni Grill in Ala Moana. Well, cheap, considering their performances are included (+ tip) with the dining experience. A young, attractive local gal who works there tore it up singing "Happy Birthday" to our guest in Italian.. BRAVO!

Erika, I gladly accept your compliment, regardless of your choice of words. :o

kaneohegirl
June 29th, 2006, 10:53 AM
Erika, you're right. Half the stuff in 99 cent store is now $1.49. What's the deal? lol Unfortunately neither there or Marukai Ward had any in stock at the moment.

So I ended up getting it from Daiei **ehem** I mean Don Quijote. Get this: They had it stocked in the KITCHEN GADGET aisle (relabeled) for $2.49. Then I look in the "Dollar" section near the registers and the same exact one is just a buck! So I bought two makers for less than the price of one for some serious 4-at-once Musubi mass production. :cool:

This is the exact model...
http://static.flickr.com/72/176082461_520803f714_o.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/34273299@N00/176082461/in/photostream/)

eh you like go back an buy 2-3 more an den mailum out to me COD? I paypal you da Kala for buy um... no can find dat kine out hea :( I get stuck makin them by hand.....

kimo55
June 29th, 2006, 11:17 AM
Theyv'e got a few of them at Macaroni Grill in Ala Moana. Well, cheap, considering their performances are included (+ tip) with the dining experience. A young, attractive local gal who works there tore it up singing "Happy Birthday" to our guest in Italian.. BRAVO!

we were there for Mom's day and her birthday.
a lil Japanese guy (redundancy?) served us and at end, belted out one too! I thot
where da hellzat noise comin from?
but it wasn't noise. he sang very well!
was surprised.
John lagan ex GM at Compadres runs the show at M.G. now.
great place. tho it's a chain. was very surpised. food was eggsell ent!

DaJoker
July 5th, 2006, 08:52 AM
Hmm... ok where to start! I've got so much crap it's not funny!

1) Pair of J.A. Henkels Santoku Knives
2) Microplane Grater
3) Stand Mixer
4) Food Processor
5) Creme Brulee Torch
6) silpat sheets
7) Mandolin
8) Blender
9) That rubber thing to get the peel off the garlic
10) Porcelain ginger grater
11) Various piping bag tips
12) More "cookie" cutters than I can count
13) Probe thermometer
14) Salad spinner
15) Adjustable Measuring spoons
16) Adjustable Measuring cup

.....and anything else that I forgot to mention

For the person looking to get one of those instant read infrared thermometers - they have them at executive chef. I nearly bought one the other day. I think it sells for ~$90

damontucker
July 5th, 2006, 09:29 AM
I know a guy who cooks everything w/ his george foreman grill...

tripped me out when did oyster in the shell even!

scrivener
July 5th, 2006, 01:58 PM
Okay, I wasn't going to let you in on this, but...

Ugh. It's going to hurt to share this in public. On August 18, the Executive Chef is having a three-hour sale. Everything in the store is 25% off. I don't remember which three hours, though. Honestly!

Erika Engle
July 9th, 2006, 01:59 PM
Okay, I wasn't going to let you in on this, but...

Ugh. It's going to hurt to share this in public. On August 18, the Executive Chef is having a three-hour sale. Everything in the store is 25% off. I don't remember which three hours, though. Honestly!
I understand your pain -- which makes your sharing of the info that much more special.
However, vulture shopper that I am, I feel compelled to add detail. The site doesn't have the sale date posted yet (perhaps it's only "advertised" to frequent shoppers or newsletter registrants?) but the site encourages visitors to check back.

http://executivechefonline.com/index.php

pzarquon
July 15th, 2006, 10:13 PM
I guess a refrigerator is a bit too big to be called a "gadget," but it's certainly a tool, and the new fridge (http://www.flickr.com/photos/hawaii/tags/refrigerator/) we got is quite "gadgety," if I do say so myself.

lavagal
July 15th, 2006, 10:17 PM
Ryan:
You could get in trouble for storing kids in the fridge.

@;)

tutusue
July 15th, 2006, 10:46 PM
I guess a refrigerator is a bit too big to be called a "gadget," but it's certainly a tool, and the new fridge (http://www.flickr.com/photos/hawaii/tags/refrigerator/) we got is quite "gadgety," if I do say so myself.
I didn't see a sheet cake in the fridge. Is it still in the bathroom! :D

pinakboy
July 27th, 2006, 08:56 PM
yup making triangle musubi is a talent. But never serve round musubi other than at a funeral reception. That's an old Japanese thing.

yah growing up my dad scolded me saying don't make round musubi :eek: coz it was for da departed! i was tinking why? same ting eh?! lol spooky so i neva try! :D

pinakboy
July 27th, 2006, 09:09 PM
hmmmm my tools would be:


chef's knife
chinese cleaver
butcher cleaver
sashimi knife
8qt pressure cooker
3 tier aluminum steamer
3 set commercial teflon frying pans
Ronco Showtime Rotisserie Grill
Aroma 15 cup electronic rice/cooker steamer
food processor
blender
george foreman grill


i know i got more but hahd fo type wit one hand in da dark on dis laptop! lol :rolleyes:

Adri
July 28th, 2006, 10:13 AM
i know i got more but hahd fo type wit one hand in da dark on dis laptop! lol :rolleyes:

um, why are you typing with one hand in the dark? or should I not ask? :eek:

pinakboy
August 1st, 2006, 09:55 AM
um, why are you typing with one hand in the dark? or should I not ask? :eek:

ay yah!! :eek:

da oddah hand stay in da cheeseball jar das why!! lol :D