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View Full Version : Deep-fried Turkey...YUCK!



alohabear
November 10th, 2005, 04:59 AM
Who else on this board HATES this stuff ? My relatives started making turkey this way about 5 years ago. I for one dread going to the Thanksgiving feast every year because of it. To me, nothing beats a roasted oven browned turkey with all the fixings. I like to brine(with 2 cups rock salt) the bird overnight, then put melted butter all over it, pop it in a 500 degree oven untill it browns(about 1 hour), then knock the temp down to 375 for about 1 1/2 - 2 hours untill done.
Comes out perfect and juicy all the time!

Leave the deep fryer for donuts and tempura! ;)

AbsolutChaos
November 10th, 2005, 06:13 AM
Never had it...was always curious to know what it tasted like. Is the main thing that it comes out very dry then?

Has anybody had deep fried turkey where it turned out pretty juicy on the inside?

sinjin
November 10th, 2005, 06:47 AM
I have done it twice. First time for Christmas in Colorado. It was 15 degrees outside where the fryer was. The results were very good. Tender and juicy. Next time bad results. Quite dry. The trick is to remember that with compressed cooking time, the window of perfection is narrow indeed. A meat thermometer is essential.

Pomai
November 10th, 2005, 07:37 AM
Tried it at a store cooking demo once. Definately moist, with a nice crunchy skin. They used a syringe and injected a liquid seasoning into it.

I'm not a turkey fan to begin with, so it wouldn't matter how the Turkey was prepared. Pass da' Stuffing and Gravy, plus some Ahi Poke and I whack 'em! ;)

Star Bulletin is currently promoting a Turkey Nightmare contest. Tell your most dreadful Thanksgiving Turkey cooking nightmare of a story and enter to win a $100 Times Supermarket Gift Certificate.

More details at this link (http://starbulletin.com/2005/11/06/features/story07.html).

Tiabla
November 10th, 2005, 07:37 AM
Deep frying turkey is huge in Colorado, where I'm from. If done correctly, it's supposed to be more juicy and succulent than oven roasting. My aunt and uncle have been doing it for years and the turkey looks and smells fantastic, and from what I hear it tastes great too (I'm vegetarian so I wouldn't know!).

A few years ago there was an "incident" with the deep fryer that caused a small fire, but that's a whole other story. Whenever I see that Allstate commercial about the people who burn down their houses due to accidents with the deep fryer, I always think of my aunt and uncle!

beaker
November 10th, 2005, 08:05 AM
A few years ago there was an "incident" with the deep fryer that caused a small fire, but that's a whole other story. Whenever I see that Allstate commercial about the people who burn down their houses due to accidents with the deep fryer, I always think of my aunt and uncle!

You can always trust some oddball relatives to provide the seeds of a good story, huh? Some relatives are most fun when you can all sit around and make fun of 'em on the Holidays. :D

bkr (shortly removed from an equally short residence in Denver/Boulder myself, but my dad prefers to do his Bird in the Weber, thank goodness)

Lalalinder
November 10th, 2005, 08:23 AM
I deep fry turkeys and they always come out perfect. The hot peanut oil makes the skin crisp while the meat stays moist. They really are delicious and I haven't oven roasted a turkey since.

Plus it's nice because it's quick, and it frees up the oven for other things.

pzarquon
November 10th, 2005, 09:07 AM
My neighbors turned half the block into deep-fried turkey converts, and judging by how well the fryers sell at Costco, it's easily one of the most popular way to prepare the bird these days. I like the flavor and the moistness (if prepared correctly), but don't think I'd do it that way myself. If I'm going to do turkey, I'm doing it the hard way!

Honestly, though, I'm a non-traditionalist with this kind of stuff. My wife is too. We've done special lasagna as our core dish for Thanksgiving. Instead of turkey, I tend to prefer Cornish Game Hens. And this year, we're so pooped, the Chinese restaurant down the street is looking like a pretty good option!

ExtraScoop
November 10th, 2005, 09:22 AM
I got a deep-fryer for a gift 2 years ago and have been frying turkeys ever since.

The one I got is an indoor model that looks like a huge crockpot.

There a many pluses to frying: the turkey is always moist, it only takes about an hour to cook a large bird, and the guessing is gone from the cooking time. There's an easy formula to use base on weight.

I have to admit I miss the herb flavor you can get by oven roasting.
You can't stuff a fried turkey either.

alohabear
November 10th, 2005, 09:30 AM
I just think they lack the Roasted flavor and it's oily.

Pua'i Mana'o
November 10th, 2005, 09:32 AM
I make giblet stuffing, pack it back in the bird, shove some butter under the skin by the breast, garlic salt and paprika the top, place into a big plastic baking bag, knot it up, poke a few holes, place in my deep dish baking roaster and bake it until its done. Make more stuffing, garlicky smashed potatoes, green salad, punkin pies and greve from the drippings.

For Christmas, we cook a prime rib roast because Foodland/SacknSave and Safeway usually put these on sale. For New Years, its homemade laulau.

And then its tax time....

Pomai
November 10th, 2005, 09:33 AM
If I were to do the deep-fry method, I'd consider maximizing the effort.

Prepare other items to throw in the HOT oil after the turkey comes out such as:

AndaDogs (Andagi-battered hot dogs)
Tempura (Shrimp and vegetable varieties)
Fried Chicken (why not? Some people dont' like turkey!)
Home-made potato chips

That's just the Barbeque animal in me... "Throw EVERYTHING ON THE GRILL!".
.. in the case, the oil!
:D

ExtraScoop
November 10th, 2005, 09:38 AM
I just think they lack the Roasted flavor and it's oily.
Actually, the ones I've fried are not oily. Almost all the oil remains in the fryer.

lurkah
November 10th, 2005, 10:07 AM
Actually, the ones I've fried are not oily. Almost all the oil remains in the fryer.

About how many gallons of peanut oil does it take to deep-fry a turkey, and what becomes of all of that oil after you're done cooking?

ExtraScoop
November 10th, 2005, 10:40 AM
About how many gallons of peanut oil does it take to deep-fry a turkey, and what becomes of all of that oil after you're done cooking?
two and a half gallons.
then it gets reused as much as possible.

Miulang
November 10th, 2005, 11:27 AM
two and a half gallons.
then it gets reused as much as possible.
Skim out all da turkey ukus and you could use it as biodiesel! (Actually, takes a little more den dat, but at least it could be the main ingredient in biodiesel fuel). :p

Miulang

Linkmeister
November 10th, 2005, 11:29 AM
But doesn't re-using mean whatever's next cooked in it take on the flavor of turkey? I used to deep-fry potatoes, but no way would I have used the same oil for fish and then use it again for potatoes.

We buy the Safeway turkey for T-day and for Christmas Eve, then do a from-scratch Roast Beast on Christmas Day.

tutusue
November 10th, 2005, 11:29 AM
two and a half gallons.
then it gets reused as much as possible.
Dumb but curious question here! Doesn't the used oil eventually (as in a short time) become contaminated by turkey bits and juices? Or does the frying temperature prevent that? :confused:

Leo Lakio
November 10th, 2005, 11:51 AM
two and a half gallons. then it gets reused as much as possible.
It's my understanding (according to friends in the South who have been doing these for decades) that, if done properly, only about 1/4-cup of the oil stays in the bird, so it's not oily; less so than standard fried chicken, in fact.

Yes, the oil does get contaminated by turkey bits - so just keep using it for more turkeys; make 'em for friends and neighbors. Any frying grease needs to be changed after a few batches of anything.

But this is NOT something to be done indoors, under any circumstances - just too dangerous. Also not for patios or wooden decks. Cement spaces away from the house are best, or a cleared patch of ground in the yard.

Pomai
November 10th, 2005, 01:14 PM
We're stickin' with the Turkey-To-Go deal.

It's easy, cost-effective, no messy kitchen or risk of personal injury, and taste as great as home-cooked.

The Li Hing Mui Cranberry Sauce from Pacific Beach Hotel's T-T-G meal last year was so ono!

ExtraScoop
November 10th, 2005, 01:34 PM
.
But this is NOT something to be done indoors, under any circumstances - just too dangerous. Also not for patios or wooden decks. Cement spaces away from the house are best, or a cleared patch of ground in the yard.

The "new style" one I have is indoor use only. It looks different than the aluminum outdoor ones that have caused houses to burn down.

It's very stable, not on a stand like the old ones. It looks like a huge crock pot.

I was hesitant to use it indoors after reading all the horror stories on-line, but I followed the directions and now feel very safe using it.

ExtraScoop
November 10th, 2005, 01:37 PM
Dumb but curious question here! Doesn't the used oil eventually (as in a short time) become contaminated by turkey bits and juices? Or does the frying temperature prevent that? :confused:
The bits get so fried it's easy to remove them with a screen/sieve thingy.

The only thing I've fried afterwards so far is another turkey and some homemade french fries. Oh, and some chicken breast pieces covered in panko.

Leo Lakio
November 10th, 2005, 01:38 PM
The "new style" one I have is indoor use only. It looks different than the aluminum outdoor ones that have caused houses to burn down.
It's very stable, not on a stand like the old ones. It looks like a huge crock pot.
I was hesitant to use it indoors after reading all the horror stories on-line, but I followed the directions and now feel very safe using it.
Excellent! Make enough turkey this year to share with all your buddies on HT now, so we can all discuss it from personal experience! :D

tutusue
November 10th, 2005, 01:50 PM
We're stickin' with the Turkey-To-Go deal.[...]
I'm with you on that! I won't be at home for either Thanksgiving or Christmas this year but I may order one of the complete dinners anyway and make a bunch of "tv dinners" and a big pot of turkey soup for the freezer. That oughta put the Tilia Foodsaver to the test and solve the no leftovers issue! Damn, now I'm hungry...

Pomai
November 10th, 2005, 02:19 PM
Just curious, is injecting the turkey with seasonings a critical part in this method? Or can you omit that and just use salt and pepper?

Reason asking is, I've got a few syringe injection seasoning ideas to consider...

Kim Chee powder (diluted in water)
Goya's Achiote Seasoning (diluted in chicken stock)
Miso paste (diluted in mirin and rice wine)
Straight Brandy (buggah going explode or what?)
Old Bay Seasoning (diluted in beer)

After all, what you load in the syringe is the only means you have in making that Turkey your own.

Lalalinder
November 10th, 2005, 03:36 PM
I don't inject them, I rub them with salt and cayenne pepper, and they are wonderful.

Some people re-use the oil up to three times by straining it through cheesecloth and then storing it in a cool, dry place, but I don't. I simply make the most of the oil by deep-frying two or three turkeys one after the other. That way, everyone gets turkey to take home and enjoy.

When I'm finished frying, I pour the oil back into the original bottles and throw it away.

ExtraScoop
November 10th, 2005, 03:58 PM
Just curious, is injecting the turkey with seasonings a critical part in this method? Or can you omit that and just use salt and pepper?

All of the injection-seasonings I've seen are cajun or spicy. No one wanted a cajun Thanksgiving turkey.
I like your idea of injecting with your own flavors though. Sounds worth a try.

alohabear
November 21st, 2005, 05:02 AM
I notice that most recipes for Deep-fried Turkey call for Peanut oil( because of it's high heat factor). So if you have a peanut allergy (http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2005/Nov/14/ln/FP511140336.html) Thanksgiving dinner may be your last. :eek:

MixedPlateBroker
November 28th, 2007, 12:49 AM
I just think they lack the Roasted flavor and it's oily.

Deep-fried turkeys done right are actually less oily, yet more moist, than an equivalent roasted bird. A clip-on thermometer is crucial to maintaining the constant oil temp needed for proper cooking. Save the oven for that rib roast.:D

SusieMisajon
November 28th, 2007, 01:45 AM
I have a friend who works in a big hotel, and he uses the used french fry oil to run his (diesel) car.

ExtraScoop
November 28th, 2007, 10:07 AM
A clip-on thermometer is crucial to maintaining the constant oil temp needed for proper cooking. D

The fryer I have has a dial built in that controls the heating coils. A light goes off when your set temp is met.

We used to fry our turkey every time but we starting missing the "herb-roasted" flavor that we could not achieve by frying. It's the same fried taste on the skin every time.