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Pomai
November 26th, 2005, 12:18 PM
This is the place for Hawaii Threads members to share your favorite soup recipes.

Hot, cold, entree or side dish. Soup warms the soul.

Pomai
November 26th, 2005, 01:00 PM
Jook (also called "Chook" and Congee) is a rice porridge soup introduced to Hawaii by Chinese immigrants during the plantation era. It's now a local tradition to make this soup after Thankgiving with the leftover turkey. Other variations exist such as Chicken (Gai Jook). Also pork and beef, though turkey is by far the most popular version in Hawaii. The perfect dish on a cool Hawaiian winter night.

Jook

Serving size: A small army or several hungry Jook fans

Soup:
Turkey bones (the whole carcass, including some meat still on)
Turkey meat (whole leftover meat, white and dark), shredded
Rice (white medium grain, regular 'kine like Hinode) - 3 to 5 cups
Ginger, roughly chopped - about 1 "finger"
Chung Choi (preserved salted turnip) You can find this in the asian section of any supermarket. Chopped rough (leave the salt on) - 1 piece
Peanuts (raw, peeled) - amount at your discretion
Water - enough to cover bones and fill pot
Cooking Oil - 2 oz. (1/4 cup)
Hawaiian Salt

Garnish: (chop each finely)
Chinese Parsley (a.k.a. Cilantro)
Green Onion
Choong Choi, rinse salt off
Water Chestnuts
Cashews (unsalted)
Lettuce, shredded
Shoyu
*The garnishing possibilites are up to you.. be creative!

In a bowl, rinse raw rice in water and drain. Pour about 1 oz. of oil and sprinkle Hawaiian salt lightly, then toss to coat. Let the rice "marinate" in this overnight at room temperature. Cover with plastic wrap. This is what's called "Hoy Fah".. to make the rice "bloom like a flower".

In a very large stock pot, pour 1 oz. of oil. Set stove dial to medium-high and place in Turkey bones. You want to brown the bones a bit, as this will add flavor to your stock. After the bones have browned slightly, pour in water to cover and fill pot about 5/6th from the top. Throw in chopped Choong Choi and ginger. Bring to boil then let simmer for about 2-3 hours.

Strain turkey broth from bones, choong choi and ginger through a sieve into another pot the same size. discard the bones and other stock ingredients. Important: Don't use any of the meat that was on those bones, as it no longer has any flavor.. it's just straw!

Return turkey broth to stove. Add marinated raw rice to pot and bring to boil, then reduce to simmer. Add turkey meat and raw peanuts. Let the whole thing simmer until the rice becomes very soft and the broth becomes gelatinous from the starch in the rice. The turkey meat should also be tender and loose. This should take about 1-1/2 to 2 hours.

When the Jook reaches a porridge-like consistency, finish it by adding Hawaiian Salt to desired taste. Don't overdo the salt. Just enough to bring out the flavor. If the Jook is too thin, you can always add more raw rice and let it simmer longer. Do this until it's just the right thickness.. like a loose porridge.

Enjoy hot with your favorite garnishes.

Last words: I've made this recipe 4 years in a row and everytime it was a family hit. Someone said it was better than Jook they've tried in Hong Kong. The quantities given are approximate. You will need to use your own "soup-making judgement" which will give your Jook your signature. A key ingredient in good Jook is the Chung Choi. You can omit it, but it will be missing that "special something" that Jook fans expects to taste. Also, don't forget the garnishes. That's what gives it added flavor, character and texture contrast. I thank my calabash Chinese aunt for teaching me how to make this. ~ Pomai

Adri
September 1st, 2006, 10:19 PM
Anybody get good recipe for Portagee Bean Soup? I do mine sort of "oyoso" and was curious about how other people make it. Any unusual seekrit ingredients? Share?

eta: I'm not looking for "googled" recipes or strictly cookbook recipes. I'm looking for tried and true, this is the way I make it for my family kine recipes :)

Kahalu'u_Chrome
September 1st, 2006, 10:37 PM
Anybody get good recipe for Portagee Bean Soup? I do mine sort of "oyoso" and was curious about how other people make it. Any unusual seekrit ingredients? Share?

eta: I'm not looking for "googled" recipes or strictly cookbook recipes. I'm looking for tried and true, this is the way I make it for my family kine recipes :)

I see all kine ways of making Portugese soup - some pretty wierd kine!
But da best is my Moms simple recipe - just ham shanks, portugese sausage, beans, cabbage, tomato sauce and macaroni. The real key ingreideint is high quality ham shanks, not ham hocks.

I get the exact stuff if you are really interested in a good, simple recipe from my mom tommorow after work and post 'um here..........

edit: Lol, ok, mebbe you do want the recipe since I just googled "oyoso" :D

eh, and no fo get - the difference between one Portagee and one Portugese.. da Portugese guy get papers!
:D

1stwahine
September 2nd, 2006, 01:02 AM
Auntie Lynn's Port. Bean Soup

Ingredients

1 Pkg. Cut Pieces Ham Hocks
1 Pkg. Port. Sausage
1 can Kidney beans
1 can Garbanzo Beans (optional)
handful of macaroni or spagetti noodles
1 cup sliced cabbage
1/2 cup sliced onions
1 cut carrot
2 Potatoes (cut into fourths)
2 cloves garlic crushed
1 bunch cilantro
1 bay leaf
2 large cans tomato sauce
1 whole can tomato
pepper,salt, garlic powder to taste
msg (optional)

Preparation

Of course, wash all your ingredients good.
Put Ham Hocks into big pot. Cover with water over three inches higher. Add everything else. Boil till everything comes soft - usually takes between 1-1/2 hours to 2 hours. Last 1/2 hour throw in cut potatoes. Onolicious!

Note: if too much water(this is first recipe) take some out. play with recipe till it becomes yours. heheheh :o

Auntie Lynn

Auntie Lynn's Family Secret as shared on KHON@ with Malolo Morales -
whenever making meat soft - put in a metal spoon into the pot and boil along with your food. ;)

Pomai
September 2nd, 2006, 03:13 AM
Auntie, I definately goin' try 'dis one. Sounds so ono! I love to dip french bread with buttah' on top in dis' 'kine soup. Winnahz!


Auntie Lynn's Port. Bean Soup

Ingredients

1 Pkg. Cut Pieces Ham Hocks
1 Pkg. Port. Sausage
1 can Kidney beans
1 can Garbanzo Beans (optional)
handful of macaroni or spagetti noodles
1 cup sliced cabbage
1/2 cup sliced onions
1 cut carrot
2 Potatoes (cut into fourths)
2 cloves garlic crushed
1 bunch cilantro
1 bay leaf
2 large cans tomato sauce
1 whole can tomato
pepper,salt, garlic powder to taste
msg (optional)

Preparation

Of course, wash all your ingredients good.
Put Ham Hocks into big pot. Cover with water over three inches higher. Add everything else. Boil till everything comes soft - usually takes between 1-1/2 hours to 2 hours. Last 1/2 hour throw in cut potatoes. Onolicious!

Note: if too much water(this is first recipe) take some out. play with recipe till it becomes yours. heheheh :o

Auntie Lynn

Auntie Lynn's Family Secret as shared on KHON@ with Malolo Morales -
whenever making meat soft - put in a metal spoon into the pot and boil along with your food. ;)

1stwahine
September 2nd, 2006, 05:50 AM
Auntie, I definately goin' try 'dis one. Sounds so ono! I love to dip french bread with buttah' on top in dis' 'kine soup. Winnahz!

Any kine of bread or roll is definitely a winner with this soup. Put plenty butter! :) Onolicious gurrans! Espeacially, on a rainy day! ;)

Enjoy

Auntie Lynn

Pomai
September 2nd, 2006, 07:15 AM
Auntie Lynn's Family Secret as shared on KHON@ with Malolo Morales -
whenever making meat soft - put in a metal spoon into the pot and boil along with your food.This part is especially interesting. Never heard of this meat tenderizing method before. Sounds like some metallurgical reaction between the (stainless steel?) spoon and the pot that does the trick. Which may bring to question exactly which type (metal-wise) of pot would work best for this to be effective.

Whoah.. all of a sudden ʻdis bean soup stay "scientificicistist". :D

Iʻve done Portuguese Bean Soup before, and it took over 2 hours on medium simmer before the smoked ham hocks became fork-tender.

You right about daʻ bread. Moʻ buttah, moʻ bettah! Witʻ poi on da side, we stylinʻ. ;)

1stwahine
September 2nd, 2006, 07:56 AM
This part is especially interesting. Never heard of this meat tenderizing method before. Sounds like some metallurgical reaction between the (stainless steel?) spoon and the pot that does the trick. Which may bring to question exactly which type (metal-wise) of pot would work best for this to be effective. Whoah.. all of a sudden ʻdis bean soup stay"scientificicistist".

heheheh. Malolo wen asked da same thing when the camera was rolling. Dis is wat I told him. "It was a Secret Technique passed down from the old cooks in da family on my Potorican side!" "I dunno how it works or the scientifics behind it but it works." As for what kind of Pot to use? Any kind. :D

Note: I do have one special Pot that I use especially for Port. Bean Soup. It's a Cast Iron Pot. ;)

Auntie Lynn

damontucker
September 2nd, 2006, 08:09 AM
Forget the hamburgers at Dukes!!! Start cooking and bring a pot of your soup aunty!!! Save us all a few burger bucks!!! :D

That sounds ONO!

1stwahine
September 2nd, 2006, 08:13 AM
Forget the hamburgers at Dukes!!! Start cooking and bring a pot of your soup aunty!!! Save us all a few burger bucks!!! :D

That sounds ONO!

Oh! No!! He got up!!! :eek:

Here we go again. :confused:

hahahahahaha

Auntie Lynn

Adri
September 2nd, 2006, 10:19 AM
Thanks Auntie! That does sound good. and thanks for the tip about the spoon, I neva heard that one before either :)

Kahalu'u_Chrome, I still interested in your mom's recipe too :) Thanks!

Now if only the weather would cooperate and rain (instead of just sprinkle and be muggy), that would be perfect for soup eating :)

WindwardOahuRN
September 3rd, 2006, 11:31 AM
Auntie Lynn's Port. Bean Soup

Ingredients

1 Pkg. Cut Pieces Ham Hocks
1 Pkg. Port. Sausage
1 can Kidney beans
1 can Garbanzo Beans (optional)
handful of macaroni or spagetti noodles
1 cup sliced cabbage
1/2 cup sliced onions
1 cut carrot
2 Potatoes (cut into fourths)
2 cloves garlic crushed
1 bunch cilantro
1 bay leaf
2 large cans tomato sauce
1 whole can tomato
pepper,salt, garlic powder to taste
msg (optional)

Preparation

Of course, wash all your ingredients good.
Put Ham Hocks into big pot. Cover with water over three inches higher. Add everything else. Boil till everything comes soft - usually takes between 1-1/2 hours to 2 hours. Last 1/2 hour throw in cut potatoes. Onolicious!

Note: if too much water(this is first recipe) take some out. play with recipe till it becomes yours. heheheh :o

Auntie Lynn

Auntie Lynn's Family Secret as shared on KHON@ with Malolo Morales -
whenever making meat soft - put in a metal spoon into the pot and boil along with your food. ;)

This looks terrific---I printed out the recipe!

Just one question---does it matter what brand of Portuguese sausage you use? Do you have a favorite? I want to get this right... :D

1stwahine
September 3rd, 2006, 01:42 PM
This looks terrific---I printed out the recipe!

Just one question---does it matter what brand of Portuguese sausage you use? Do you have a favorite? I want to get this right... :D

Any brand will do. I usually buy Redondo's because of the size. However, for taste I prefer Gouveia's! :D

Let me know how your Soup came out.

Auntie Lynn

WindwardOahuRN
September 3rd, 2006, 02:33 PM
Any brand will do. I usually buy Redondo's because of the size. However, for taste I prefer Gouveia's! :D

Let me know how your Soup came out.

Auntie Lynn

Thanks, Auntie. I'm working 75 hours in eight days. This is my only full day off until Thursday---I should be cleaning and doing laundry but look where I am :D.

I'll be able to pick up the ingredients by the end of the week. I'll let you know how it turns out! :)

lavagal
September 3rd, 2006, 02:35 PM
Jook (also called "Chook" and Congee) SNIP! I thank my calabash Chinese aunt for teaching me how to make this. ~ Pomai


Pomai:
I thank you for this. When I got my first civilian job here in Hawaii at Kaiser Permanente, the computer services department planned for Jook the Monday after Thanksgiving. We were all tasked with an ingredient. I was assigned dried orange peel, which I found at Times Beretania (had or still has a pretty good ethnic food section). They set up a crock pot with all the ingredients in the morning and by lunchtime we were all ready. It was wonderful. I think this is a meal that tastes best when enjoyed with many others.

I plan on printing out your recipe and saving it for this fall.

Mahalo, Pomai!

Adri
September 3rd, 2006, 02:42 PM
Kahalu'u_Chrome: One story about my "oyoso" cooking method ;) I have a non-local friend who cooks a lot. She cooks dishes that use rice so I figured she knew how rice expands when tossed into things like soup. I made jook and she asked for the recipe. I told her ~ boil turkey bones, etc. etc. and then throw in some washed, uncooked rice. I figured she would know about how much. hee! It came out like rice pilaf but thicker. She cut the batch in half and froze the half, poured in more water and it thickened up again. She cut that batch in half and froze half, etc. It became our joke. The neverending pot of jook. She was giving it away to anyone who would take a chunk and still had some frozen in her freezer.

WindwardOahuRN
September 3rd, 2006, 02:44 PM
Kahalu'u_Chrome: One story about my "oyoso" cooking method ;) I have a non-local friend who cooks a lot. She cooks dishes that use rice so I figured she knew how rice expands when tossed into things like soup. I made jook and she asked for the recipe. I told her ~ boil turkey bones, etc. etc. and then throw in some washed, uncooked rice. I figured she would know about how much. hee! It came out like rice pilaf but thicker. She cut the batch in half and froze the half, poured in more water and it thickened up again. She cut that batch in half and froze half, etc. It became our joke. The neverending pot of jook. She was giving it away to anyone who would take a chunk and still had some frozen in her freezer.

LOL---kinda like sourdough starter.. ;)

WindwardOahuRN
September 9th, 2006, 04:38 PM
Any brand will do. I usually buy Redondo's because of the size. However, for taste I prefer Gouveia's! :D

Let me know how your Soup came out.

Auntie Lynn

I made it today!! FANTASTIC!!

I used the Redondo's sausage, mild. I cut down a bit on the cilantro because I'm not a big fan of cilantro.

Couldn't get ham hocks but I remembered Kahalu'u Chrome's suggestion about the ham shanks and was able to get them. Lotsa nice meat on those shanks, too.

Thanks for the recipe, Auntie! It's definitely a keeper! :D

Pomai
September 9th, 2006, 04:55 PM
Couldn't get ham hocks but I remembered Kahalu'u Chrome's suggestion about the ham shanks and was able to get them. Lotsa nice meat on those shanks, too.I can't imagine PBS tasting authentic without smoked ham hocks. Surely it'll taste great, but not the same. But then again, I'm just nitpicking.

Heck, as long as you have a nice and hearty slice of bread with thick spread of butter or margarine to go with it, it's ALL GOOD!

RN, I bet your ohana is very happy to help you finish the pot! :)

anapuni808
September 9th, 2006, 05:12 PM
I just saved both of these recipes. I usually make a small batch of Jook for New Year's eve/day so will have to wait for that one. But, the PBS will be made soon! I love to eat soup & Foodland makes those really good La Brea baguettes that will be very good with it, of course with lots of butter!

I can almost taste it now...................

WindwardOahuRN
September 9th, 2006, 05:13 PM
I can't imagine PBS tasting authentic without smoked ham hocks. Surely it'll taste great, but not the same. But then again, I'm just nitpicking.

Heck, as long as you have a nice and hearty slice of bread with thick spread of butter or margarine to go with it, it's ALL GOOD!

RN, I bet your ohana is very happy to help you finish the pot! :)

It's only me and my husband. He doesn't touch any food containing tomato products. Actually, he is very much an Irish meat-and-potato person, and I am very much not. Well, maybe ethnically, but not gastronomically.

I am going to freeze the soup in small batches. I do this with a lot of things I make---I have a problem making small pots of anything, from spaghetti sauce to stews. I think I was a mess hall cook in a former life. So I just freeze the food in meal-size containers and have a big selection of little treasures for the future.

The ham shanks were smoked, BTW. IMHO, they tasted pretty much the same as smoked hocks, which I often use for my pea soup---maybe a bit more meat on them, too. And I got the bread and butter----all good!

WindwardOahuRN
September 9th, 2006, 05:26 PM
I just realized you used the word "authentic," Pomai.

Of course I wouldn't know what "authentic" tastes like, as far as Portuguese Bean Soup goes.

But I do recognize "delicious" when I taste it :D

This is good stuff. I am pigging out, even as we speak.

1stwahine
September 9th, 2006, 05:41 PM
Smoked Ham Hocks or Smoked Ham Shanks makes an authentic Port. Bean Soup! :D

I'm glad you're enjoying it WindwardOahuRN!!!!

Auntie Lynn

jkpescador
December 3rd, 2006, 07:09 AM
Thanks Auntie Lynn. I have used a variation of your recipe two times and two times good. I started up the recipe not realizing I was missing ingredients. So I had to make do with what I could find. :)

I kept forgetting to come on and thank you for your post!

1stwahine
December 3rd, 2006, 07:19 AM
Thanks Auntie Lynn. I have used a variation of your recipe two times and two times good. I started up the recipe not realizing I was missing ingredients. So I had to make do with what I could find. :)

I kept forgetting to come on and thank you for your post!

You are very welcome jkpescador!:D This weather is great foa Portagee Bean Soup!;) I gotta make a pot soon too....with bread and lots of butta!

Auntie Lynn

Marco
December 3rd, 2006, 12:46 PM
This weather is great foa Portagee Bean Soup!;) I gotta make a pot soon too....with bread and lots of butta!

Auntie Lynn
Sounds onolicious, Auntie L. My best soup recipe usually involves a can opener and a microwave :D

We're going to Foodland right now, and I just came back here to reread this thread and write out the ingredients for your podagee bean soup. We're going to make some tonight for my ohana's usual Sunday potluck. I don't know what "ham hocks" are though. Either does my wife. Maybe someone at the grocery store will know.

I can't wait to take all the credit for your recipe when everyone asks where we learned to make this. Nah, jus joke. We'll give you all da credit :)

Hellbent
December 3rd, 2006, 02:10 PM
pork udon soup

this is a recipe i got from a friend, it was told orally to me, so its mostly to taste. ive also made some adjustments, feel free to add your own.

4 packs udon
4 cans chicken broth
garlic
1/2-1 lb pork shoulder
shoyu
vietnamese hot sauce
fish sauce
salt and pepper
spinach
1 egg

fry garlic and pork (cut into small pieces) in a little bit of oil, with seasoning to taste.
add chicken broth, bring to boil. add fish sauce, vietnamese hot sauce to taste.
add chopped spinach, break egg into soup, stir.
add udon before serving.

1stwahine
December 3rd, 2006, 02:26 PM
I can't wait to take all the credit for your recipe when everyone asks where we learned to make this. Nah, jus joke. We'll give you all da credit :)

Dear Marco, A recipe becomes yours ~ just play/add to it and it becomes your own. You made it...so you take the credit!;)

Love and Aloha

Auntie Lynn

nikki
December 4th, 2006, 05:58 AM
Oxtail Soup

Parboil oxtails, clean and cut off fat. Put in large pot with lots of water, sliced ginger, raw peanuts, dried dates, star anise, 1 stalk celery and 1/2 onion. May add dash sake, hondashi. Some people add a can of beef broth. Cook until meat falls off the bone, take out celery, onion and anise. Actually, I use a crockpot and let it cook overnight.

Ladle into bowl and top with cilantro, green onions, water chestnuts, baby corn, whatever. Serve with grated ginger and shoyu for dipping.

dallascat70
December 4th, 2006, 02:52 PM
Ty, Auntie Lynne, I have a huge pot on right now, I couldnt wait for a rainy day! Smells so good, cant wait! :)

Jake's Ohana
December 4th, 2006, 03:43 PM
When I eat portagee soup, I somehow adopted my nana's husband's knack for eatting it with a splash of ketchup inside. He one portagee that ate his that way. I guess what ever floats your boat. :D

Marco
December 4th, 2006, 11:09 PM
Dear Marco, A recipe becomes yours ~ just play/add to it and it becomes your own. You made it...so you take the credit!;)

Love and Aloha

Auntie Lynn
Haha. Thanks Auntie L, but we already gave you the credit. :)

Just so you know, everyone loved it! Good thing I saved some for myself before serving it, because next time I looked, it was cleaned out!

Planning to make some more later this week, and I've got some ideas of my own to add to it. Mahalo again for the recipe!

1stwahine
December 5th, 2006, 02:40 AM
Ty, Auntie Lynne, I have a huge pot on right now, I couldnt wait for a rainy day! Smells so good, cant wait!

heheheh

I'm sooo happy a lot of you are cooking it!:D


Haha. Thanks Auntie L, but we already gave you the credit. :)

Just so you know, everyone loved it! Good thing I saved some for myself before serving it, because next time I looked, it was cleaned out!

Planning to make some more later this week, and I've got some ideas of my own to add to it. Mahalo again for the recipe!

Thats great. What are you adding? Don't forget the bread with plenty butta!;) hahahaha

Auntie Lynn

Pomai
December 5th, 2006, 09:26 AM
Here's a bowl of Jook I made from this past TGD turkey....

http://www.96seven44.com/images/jook_spoonful.jpg

I made the rice "porridge" kinda' thick in this batch, as you can see how gelatinous it looks in the spoon. Gotta' love those random pieces of turkey to chew on. Yum. It woulda' been nice if I had some chopped peanuts as an additional condiment, but nevah' stay get. The green is Chinese Parsley.

Hey, when you make Miso soup, how do you start your broth? If I'm lazy, I just add a packet of Dashi No Moto (bonito powder) to the hot water, add the miso paste and that's it. Otherwise, I start it by simmering Kombu (the really thick one) and a few pieces of saba, scallops and/or clams and simmer until it extracts the flavors, strain, then add the Dashi No Moto. That method adds unbeatable depth and character to the finished soup, making it taste much more authentic - not so generic. Learned that method from a Nihongin friend of ours. I prefer Shiro Miso (the white one).

I'd say my favorite soups are Clam Chowder, Chicken Noodle, Miso, Portuguese Bean and Jook; in no particular order - just depending on mood.

Safeway's deli soups are really ono too.

WindwardOahuRN
December 5th, 2006, 05:16 PM
I'd say my favorite soups are Clam Chowder.

Which kind of clam chowder?

Although it tastes okay, the frequently-gluey "New England" clam chowder is far from authentic. Over-thickened with flour paste, often. Toss it in a bread bowl and serve it to the masses on Fisherman's Wharf.

I just had this discussion with a co-worker who is originally from Boston. Recipe? Salt pork, onions, potatoes, salt, pepper, clam liquor, milk, clams. Rather thin, compared to the stuff often served as New England style clam chowder.

I make a Long Island style chowder, which is similar to a Rhode Island clam chowder. The basic LI chowder from the 1600's is clams, clam liquor, onions, salt, pepper, and thyme. The modern version varies with the addition of salt pork, carrots, celery, potatoes, and a bit of tomato. The broth is still very milky-looking---not at all like that hideous Campbells Vegetable Soup with a Clam Passed Over it "Manhattan Clam Chowder."

Incidentally, I use the canned clams from Costco for my chowder now. Used to get them fresh, sometimes clamming from friends, in NY. The canned are pretty good. They even come with a bit of sand. :)

jkpescador
December 11th, 2006, 06:49 AM
Pomai

I followed your jook recipe and it came out ono. Mahalo!

Pomai
December 11th, 2006, 08:15 AM
Pomai

I followed your jook recipe and it came out ono. Mahalo!Good to hear that. You're welcome. :)

turtlegirl
September 25th, 2008, 01:48 PM
I need help with my Miso soup.

Got a tub of miso, and followed the directions on the tub. Garnished it with green onions. It didn't come out bad, just my soup was like McDonalds coffe as compared with fresh Kona coffee. I ate it, but I'd never serve it to anyone else. What went wrong? I need some miso soup recipe tricks!

kani-lehua
September 25th, 2008, 03:03 PM
heh, turtlegirl? try looking at pomai's post #35 he talks about his way of making miso soup.

SusieMisajon
October 14th, 2008, 08:50 AM
Fry a smashed garlic clove in a bit of butter and then add a grated zucchini. Add chicken or vegetable broth and bring just to a boil, then drop in an egg and stir gently. Top with a sprinkle of parsley and eat.

Ron Whitfield
October 14th, 2008, 11:28 AM
For a ton of great tasting and healthy soup recipes, just google - greek soup.

Adri
November 8th, 2008, 01:22 PM
It was kinda rainy yesterday so I planned to make portuguese bean soup for dinner tonight thinking it might be a rainy night. I stopped off shopping after work and picked up smoked ham shanks and carrots and thought I had the rest of the ingredients. Today I was gathering the ingredients together and realized *eep* I have no portagee sausage. How can that be? I have reindeer sausage that a relative gave to me for Christmas and I can't bring myself to eat. I know it's probably good, but still. I guess no can make portuguese bean soup without the portuguese sausage. Back to the market I go. :p

SusieMisajon
December 5th, 2008, 06:45 AM
In a large-ish pot, in hot goosefat, fry cut up leeks, carrots, onions, garlic, cabbage, potatoes, celery and pumpkin til sligtly brownd. Add thyme, bayleaf, salt, pepper, parsley, Tabasco, and a vegetable or chicken stock cube (optional), add soaked small white beans, or add a can of beans. Top with water and simmer til delicious.

Bacon, hambone, chickenfeets, or duck confit optional.

SusieMisajon
December 6th, 2008, 06:44 AM
Soup is always better on the second day.

cyleet99
December 19th, 2008, 12:33 PM
Oh, my gosh. Wow. Mmmmmmmmmmmm.

Auntie Lynn, mahalos to the max for your PBS recipe. At first I thought it was too much water, until it started to thicken and It Is the Bestest Soup! The Cilantro really makes it good!

Gonna go get more. I was going to serve this for supper, but I don't think it will last that long.....:D

Pomai, I printed out the Jook recipe for after Christmas. You guys are the best!

lavagal
December 19th, 2008, 02:24 PM
In a large-ish pot, in hot goosefat, fry cut up leeks, carrots, onions, garlic, cabbage, potatoes, celery and pumpkin til sligtly brownd. Add thyme, bayleaf, salt, pepper, parsley, Tabasco, and a vegetable or chicken stock cube (optional), add soaked small white beans, or add a can of beans. Top with water and simmer til delicious.

Bacon, hambone, chickenfeets, or duck confit optional.


Darlin' exactly where in Hawaii am I gonna get goosefat without having to mortgage my house to Whole Paycheck? This might be French peasantry cooking at its finest, and for that I wanna spill your champagne into the street! You MOCK US!

Was it good?

turtlegirl
December 19th, 2008, 02:48 PM
Haha Lavagal! My thoughts exactly!!

Here's one for the vegetarians - KRAZY KORN KCHOWDER! Yummy on rainy days and super easy to make! I love it!! :) Here's the basic recipe, but the possible additions (like jalapenos..;)) make it versatile.

Heat 1/3 cup butter or spread in big pot.
Cook two onions finely chopped over med-hi heat for 5 min., or til golden
throw in 2 or 3 crushed garlic cloves, and a scant tablespoon of cumin seeds
Stir briskly for 1-2 minutes, then
Add 2 medium large potatoes, diced, and 4 cups vegetable stock. (can use vegi bouillon cubes dissolved in hot water)
Boil, then simmer 10-15 minutes

While simmering, open 1 can of corn, drain, and blend it with a few spoonfuls of the liquid in the pot. You can use a stick blender, or just dump the can of corn in a regular blender.

Add one more can of corn, drained, to the simmering soup. Cook 5 minutes. Add corn puree, cook 5 more minutes.
Stir in 1 cup grated cheddar cheese. Melt.
Add salt & pepper to taste, and 1/4 cup cream or milk.
Garnish with fresh parsley or chives.
And maybe some tortilla chips.
Enjoy.

SusieMisajon
December 19th, 2008, 09:50 PM
Darlin' exactly where in Hawaii am I gonna get goosefat without having to mortgage my house to Whole Paycheck? This might be French peasantry cooking at its finest, and for that I wanna spill your champagne into the street! You MOCK US!

Was it good?


Oh. Sorry. Yeah, it was delicious.

Goose and duck fat are plentiful around here, all the peasants (the French word for farmer is ''paysan') are busy force-feeding the birds to make foie gras and confit and maigret for Christmas. Christmas Eve is one big orgy of food that begins at midnight and doesn't stop til the kids wake up to open their presents.

Goose and duck fat in the winter are to SW France what mangoes are to Hawaii in June...can't even give the stuff away.

Someone gave me three gallons of rendered fat, so I canned it in smaller amounts and use it for everything possible. It's very nice for frying fries along with a clove of garlic or two.


(wanna trade for some ripe mangoes?)

acousticlady
December 20th, 2008, 03:32 AM
Seeing all these delicious soup recipes, I had to add in an old family recipe - vegetable beef soup.

Get two or three marrow bones, preferably shin bones with the meat on (and yes they are easily obtainable in Hawaii) Put the whole thing into a big pot and add water. Add some large chunks of celery, onion and carrots. Simmer until the marrow comes out of the bone and the meat is falling off the bone. About three hours. Pull the meat out and set aside. Using a slotted spoon, get all the vegetables out, leaving the broth (and marrow - that's where the flavor comes from). When the meat has cooled, shred it using your fingers - pulling out any big pieces of gristle and fat - and put back into the broth. Add two bags of mixed vegetables, a large can of whole tomatoes (squished between your fingers), a liberal splash of red wine and a good amount of salt (to taste). Simmer for an hour or so. My grandmother would then add barley, my mother would add potatoes and I make dumplings - 3-4 eggs beat slightly, a pinch of salt and mix in flour a little at a time until the mixture plops (slightly thicker than running, but thinner than sticking to) off the spoon. Get the soup to a rolling boil and spoon the dumplings into the soup. This should be added spoonful by spoonful. The dumpling should plop (best description I can think of) into the broth and sink to the bottom. As they begin to cook, they will rise to the top. Cover and continue cooking for about 15-20 minutes. You can't over cook them, but usually no one wants to wait any longer. The dumplings go first. So the next day, the soup is better, but rarely do I have any dumplings left.

cyleet99
December 20th, 2008, 05:55 PM
Darlin' exactly where in Hawaii am I gonna get goosefat without having to mortgage my house to Whole Paycheck? This might be French peasantry cooking at its finest, and for that I wanna spill your champagne into the street! You MOCK US!

Was it good?


LG!! Back away from the NENE! NO, you cannot use the Nene!!

And you better get away from that mallard, too!

heeheehee:D

matapule
November 13th, 2010, 12:36 PM
Matapule's favorite soup

Cheesey Corn Chowder

2 c. water
2 c. diced raw potatoes
1/2 c. diced raw carrots
1/2 c. chopped celery
1/2 small onion, chopped
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper

boil above for 10 minutes

meanwhile make white sauce:

1/4 c. melted butter
1/4 c. flour
2 c. milk
2 c. grated cheddar cheese

stir flour into butter until bubbling on med heat
add milk slowly and cook until comes to a boil and thickened
remove from heat, add cheese and stir until a melted mess

Add cheese/white sauce to undrained vegetable/water mix
Add 1 to 2 c. frozen corn
(Optional) add chopped ham or shrimp or chicken as desired

Return all the above to low heat
Stir occassionally until corn is warm
Serve immediately with garlic toast

!Oiaue, ifo 'aupito!