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jkpescador
February 17th, 2006, 06:41 AM
Anyone seen them in Hawaii?
Does anyone know how to build a hummingbird feeder?

Glen Miyashiro
February 17th, 2006, 06:55 AM
I don't think there are any hummingbirds in Hawai'i. There are hummingbird moths here, though.

Babooze
February 17th, 2006, 09:37 AM
I have seen them, but they are pretty rare(I thought they were really big bees/moths at first). I dont think there are enough of them that building a feeder would attract them.

Leo Lakio
February 17th, 2006, 11:31 AM
According to all the bird experts I've known, there are still no hummingbirds in Hawai`i. Easy to mistake the hummingbird/clearwing moths (Hemaris thysbe and Amphion floridensis) for them, as they mimic hummingbird behavior, though I don't know if both species appear in the Islands.

Da Rolling Eye
February 17th, 2006, 05:35 PM
That's what I thought. No hummingbirds. That hummingbird moth is also rare, though. Last time I saw one was over 40 yrs. ago, in the front yard up here in Wahiawa. I thought it was a hummingbird.

jkpescador
February 17th, 2006, 05:58 PM
I'll have to ask my neighbors again. I saw a picture of the moth and it sure looks like a hummingbird. A friend that lives about 1 mile away said he saw a "hummingbird" in his strawberry guava too. I thought it was interesting that I had two sightings in one weekend.

Da Rolling Eye
February 17th, 2006, 06:43 PM
The more I think about it, the more I think I did see a hummingbird way back then. It was no longer than a couple of inches, real tiny, was an irridescent yellow/green and had regular birdlike eyes and appeared to have feathers, not moth hair. How can I remember so clearly? I got right up to it and watched it for a couple of minutes as it flitted from flower to flower. At first I thought it was a mejiro, that little green papaya bird, but those don't hover.

sinjin
February 17th, 2006, 08:22 PM
http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.hbmp.hawaii.edu/images/moth.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.hbmp.hawaii.edu/faq.html&h=133&w=180&sz=21&tbnid=dgNZsYf8ucsShM:&tbnh=70&tbnw=96&hl=en&start=1&prev=/images%3Fq%3D%2522hummingbird%2Bmoth%2522%2Bhawaii %26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26safe%3Doff%26sa% 3DN

Glen Miyashiro
February 17th, 2006, 10:16 PM
Here's a page on the Sphingids of Hawaii (http://www.hear.org/starr/insects/sphingids/index.html). "Sphingids" are the family of sphinx moths, also known as hawk moths, also known as hummingbird moths. I have seen these guys from time to time, and sometimes I have run across the caterpillars and the pupae as well. They're really big, for moths!

Da Rolling Eye -- it is always possible that you really did see a hummingbird. Maybe one snuck into the islands via a cargo shipment, or maybe someone brought one in as a pet and it somehow got out. But it would only live a few years before dying of old age, and if it didn't have a mate, then it wouldn't be able to start a breeding population.

jkpescador
February 17th, 2006, 10:20 PM
Do the moths hover?
I will ask my neighbors if they saw a long beak.

They described the movements as darting. Does the moth dart?

FYI, I live in Mililani Mauka.

I am seeing more meijiros recently. :)

beaker
February 18th, 2006, 12:37 AM
The more I think about it, the more I think I did see a hummingbird way back then. It was no longer than a couple of inches, real tiny, was an irridescent yellow/green and had regular birdlike eyes and appeared to have feathers, not moth hair. How can I remember so clearly? I got right up to it and watched it for a couple of minutes as it flitted from flower to flower. At first I thought it was a mejiro, that little green papaya bird, but those don't hover.

You'd need to get a good Hawaii bird book and do some investigation. Yellow/green is a pretty common bird color around here. Some of the upper rainforest birds do make a trilling sound like a hummingbird when they fly around, though.

scrivener
February 18th, 2006, 06:26 AM
I was at a friend's house in Mililani Mauka when I first saw hummingbird moths. They were hummingbird-sized. They darted. They hovered. They sucked nectar from flowers. They looked feathery. They looked in every way like hummingbirds.

But they had antennae.

Moths for sure.

Da Rolling Eye
February 18th, 2006, 07:22 AM
Yup. Nomoah. Just 2 varieties of hummingbird moths, the Sphinx and Blackburn's Sphinx moth. Funny thing is their habitats do not include Oahu. :confused: The Hawk or Sphinx live on Kauai. Blackburn's on Maui, The Big Island and, more recently, Kahoolawe. Neat eh? Amazing what you can find online. This guy even said that the Sphinx can be mistaken for a hummingbird even when looked at in good conditions.

The pics, a couple of members so graciously provided, didn't include a nice sample of the green one I saw. This guy's page did www.birdinghawaii.co.uk/faqs2.htm.

Myth....busted! :)

jk, sorry can't help you on how to build a feeder, but I have no doubt you can find them for sale online or even a set of plans, if you still want to go there.

sinjin
February 18th, 2006, 07:44 AM
I was fooled from no further than a meter away. It was flitting a bit though.

damontucker
February 18th, 2006, 07:51 AM
Anyone seen them in Hawaii?
Does anyone know how to build a hummingbird feeder?
Do flying b-52 cockroaches count???

They sure humm

Da Rolling Eye
February 18th, 2006, 01:06 PM
Sinjin, I was only about a foot away watching the one I saw. <LOL>

If them B52's could hover, they'd be like a hummingbird from hell. If they could hover it wouldn't be at no flowers, that's for sure. Where's that can of brake cleaner. Gotta go outside tonight and make sure no moah crawling on the house trying to get into our windows. <shudder>

kimo55
February 18th, 2006, 01:08 PM
Do flying b-52 cockroaches count???

only to four.

They sure humm


can ya blame them if they don't know the words?!

Leo Lakio
February 21st, 2006, 11:12 AM
Do flying b-52 cockroaches count???
They sure hummI never hear them humming; it would be drowned out by the screams of the tourist at whom the cockaroach was flying.

craigwatanabe
February 21st, 2006, 11:33 AM
Anyone seen them in Hawaii?
Does anyone know how to build a hummingbird feeder?


I don't know but if you Hum a few bars I could fake it :D

Leo Lakio
February 21st, 2006, 12:02 PM
I don't know but if you Hum a few bars I could fake it :DWait until I get out my Seals & Crofts records...

cyber_ykk
February 24th, 2006, 02:10 AM
dont think there are hummingbirds in HW

jkpescador
August 27th, 2006, 09:51 AM
picture of hummingbird hawk moth
http://www.flickr.com/photos/65429206@N00/215385572/

tikiyaki
August 27th, 2006, 10:07 AM
Too bad you guys don't have hummingbirds, they're really great to watch. They love Bird of Paradise Flowers, and I always seem them howering around in those.

beaker
August 27th, 2006, 06:58 PM
Too bad you guys don't have hummingbirds, they're really great to watch. They love Bird of Paradise Flowers, and I always seem them howering around in those.

There are plenty of nice birds here already. They all live above 4000 feet elevation and are in danger of going extinct at any moment. Don't wish for more invasive species which will put even more pressure on them. Anyone who brings invasive species here should be staked out in a field so the mongooses can eat their extremeties and the rats can chew their eyeballs out. :mad: (do I sound bitter?)

CranBeree
August 27th, 2006, 07:41 PM
we've got african greys...are those invasive?

beaker
August 27th, 2006, 07:48 PM
we've got african greys...are those invasive?

Keep 'em in the house and I won't tell. ;)

CranBeree
August 27th, 2006, 08:06 PM
:) reason i ask is that sometimes bird owners sometimes due to lack of supervision or whatever, lose their birds. just wondering how cockatiels, lovebirds, greys etc affect the wild bird population.

beaker
August 27th, 2006, 08:38 PM
:) reason i ask is that sometimes bird owners sometimes due to lack of supervision or whatever, lose their birds. just wondering how cockatiels, lovebirds, greys etc affect the wild bird population.

I doubt they'd go up to the elevations that the remaining native birds live at. However, any bird that comes close is a disease carrier and competition for space and resources, and could strengthen the mosquito population. Hummingbirds are perfectly happy with high elevations and cooler weather, and it seems like they'd go bonkers if introduced here.

Leo Lakio
August 28th, 2006, 07:27 AM
Anyone who brings invasive species here...Unfortunately, there are many who would consider transplants from other states (such as yourself) to be an "invasive species," too. :p

hawaiidreaming
August 29th, 2006, 04:02 AM
what birds do the islands have?

beaker
August 29th, 2006, 04:57 PM
Look at http://birdinghawaii.co.uk

This one is less comprehensive but has some nice artwork:
http://www.hawaii.gov/dlnr/consrvhi/forestbirds/

hawaiidreaming
August 30th, 2006, 05:15 AM
mahalo i think ill be going to Kapiolani Park thats the nearest to where i am staying :)