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  • Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

    My gig is about sitting and watching then taking action. Looking at the way traditional/terrestrial media seem to be worried about the internet leads me to believe that there are allot of adminastrative decisions (cut backs and lay-offs) being made that are on the defense and not offence.

    All these media groups still have a bunch of shelf life left if they focus more on interactivity with the internet instead it being a means to an end or just "something we have to do to stay current" attitude.

    IMO, if the AE's of the media groups embrace and show potiential clients how to do re-direct advertising for their clients, they will activate a whole new approach and up the closeing rate. Of course, the media group still has to keep their eye on the ball on the creativity of the programming and writting.

    Can print slow down the decline if not rebound? Can radio survive the competition of Mp3 players in cars and online radio stations? Can TV, at least here locally, still grow and gain more viewers? YES, YES and YES.......but only if they would just ignite the global sector of their own!

    Yea, I'm pretty optimistic about it but I also live by the Darwinian principal "Adapt or Die".
    Aloha!

    Geebz

  • #2
    Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

    A study on employment in the media, as reported during the week at radio and records industry Web site AllAccess.com.
    --------------------------------------------------
    Size of Media Workforce Sinks To 15-Year Low
    Get out of media. Get into marketing, writes WORKFORCE.COM..

    U.S. media employment in DECEMBER fell to a 15-year low (886,900), slammed by the slumping newspaper industry. But employment in advertising/marketing services, agencies and other firms that provide marketing and communications services to marketers, broke a record in NOVEMBER (769,000). Marketing consulting powered that growth.

    Here’s the reason behind the disparity: Marketers still invest in marketing, but they have options far beyond paid media -- digital initiatives, direct marketing, promotions and events, just to name a few. That creates more opportunities for consultants to help define strategies.

    It’s a different picture in media. Since media employment peaked in dot-com-infused 2000, media companies have eliminated one in six jobs (167,600). Newspapers, TV and radio all cut staffing last year. The only media sectors to add jobs: magazines (up a meager 400 jobs) and Internet media companies (up 9,200).

    Internet media companies, a sector that includes search engines and Web portals, is a bright spot, with a 13.4% jump in jobs last year. Still, Internet media employment remains 31% below its peak during the dot-com bubble.

    While radio has lost jobs, the big problem is newspapers, which account for half (82,800) of media jobs lost since 2000. One in four newspaper jobs have disappeared since newspaper employment peaked in 1990. Newspapers, saddled with heavy costs of printing and distribution, last year accounted for 38% of U.S. media jobs, down from 50%
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The job cuts referenced in the story are from last year, but cuts are continuing across the media.

    Many of the folks being cut are CONTENT PROVIDERS, who create what the readers, listeners and viewers read, hear and watch.

    I just have to wonder why the industry is seemingly working so hard to make itself irrelevant to the very audience it hopes to "monetize."
    Last edited by Erika Engle; February 23, 2008, 04:02 PM. Reason: context
    **************************************
    I know a lot less than what there is to be known.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

      Well I may be off your subject as it were but man, I CANNOT live without a newspaper! Before the internet I'd beg anyone who traveled to bring me a Sunday paper from where they went. Man, I'd devour that thing and totally
      revel in every section. I still to this day subscribe to both papers making a daily ritual of reading them. Truly, I'm a newspaper junkie. My husband will never forget one year up at Volcano we were in this kipuka watching nene and there was a newspaper left on a little picnic table and I just had to go pick it up. I do though involve myself greatly in all things internet and even write features for a site. I kind of listen off and on to the radio but don't find much
      of interest regarding air personalities. Anyway that's my media addiction!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

        Both of the posts above where dead on both in fact and personal opinion. I love running through the paper too. What a great way to spend Sunday morning with cup of java.

        But unfortunately with the points Erika's post made, it's the hard costs of physical production and distribution that's the real kill-off. You just can't win there.

        But many in print are seeing the freedom that the internet gives and are able to venture into the new age with stronger streams of income should they choose. It really is going to depend on the type of brand equity a writer has within their readership.

        As many print providers are battling eZine distributors also because article companies like ARA Content are providing jobs to many qualified writers.
        Aloha!

        Geebz

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

          I'd like to bring this thread back to life for a bit as I think it hits on something important in what the Internet brings to the table as far as traditional media is concerned. Media is converging... Whether we like it or not.

          If all media outlets are actively trying to use the web as the saviour to their businesses, then aren't they in fact becoming all the same? Media is losing the boundaries that they had before. Print for in-depth stories (daily or weekly), TV for short snippets of current news, and radio pushing entertainment (although talk shows are still around).

          But the web pushes us all to web content delivery and the lines begin to blur. That affects business models, staffing and content (look at SB and HA's move towards video, KPUA having AP feeds, and TV sites having some long-form).

          So who of the bunch is doing it right and why? A selfish question coming from me as I am in the "industry," and can change things. But what I'm really looking for is opinions on implementation, methodology... even theology (for the lack of a better word). This is my first post... So please bear with me...

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

            Originally posted by IslandBeef View Post
            If all media outlets are actively trying to use the web as the saviour to their businesses, then aren't they in fact becoming all the same? Media is losing the boundaries that they had before. Print for in-depth stories (daily or weekly), TV for short snippets of current news, and radio pushing entertainment (although talk shows are still around).
            Yes, you're right about the mistake that MOST traditional media is making by re-purposing hamster-wheel mentality trying to integrate mixed Web 2.0 into their web with very little success. Unfortunately a continuation of interruption marketing.

            Actually, I'm giving a free webinar May 7th from Clear Channel's The Hall called "Hawaii Is The Center Of The World" that is going to address the issues about Hawaii's traditional media and advertising agencies and integrated marketing's success a failures.

            I'll also be mentioning HawaiiThreads in my webinar because it has been the face of much Buzz Monitoring that I have been showing my clients. I just got through talking to a new Hawaii based financial company about Buzz Monitoring and we pulled up some crazy things from this forum and it's archives which is proving to be very powerful to local companies - good and bad.

            HawaiiThreads has been around long enough that the P2P referencing with Buzz Monitoring on Hawaii based companies has become more of an impact in cosumer searching than sponsored or PPC Google tactics. Let the peoples voice be heard..... HOORAY HAWAIITHREADS!
            Last edited by mel; April 21, 2008, 08:13 PM. Reason: fix closed [/QUOTE] tag
            Aloha!

            Geebz

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

              Originally posted by IslandBeef View Post
              If all media outlets are actively trying to use the web as the saviour to their businesses, then aren't they in fact becoming all the same? Media is losing the boundaries that they had before. Print for in-depth stories (daily or weekly), TV for short snippets of current news, and radio pushing entertainment (although talk shows are still around).
              Yes, you're right about the mistake that MOST traditional media is making by re-purposing hamster-wheel mentality trying to integrate mixed Web 2.0 into their web with very little success. Unfortunately a continuation of interruption marketing.

              Actually, I'm giving a free webinar May 7th from Clear Channel's The Hall called "Hawaii Is The Center Of The World" that is going to address the issues about Hawaii's traditional media and advertising agencies and integrated marketing's success and failures.

              I'll also be mentioning HawaiiThreads in my webinar because it has been the face of much Buzz Monitoring that I have been showing my clients. I just got through talking to a new Hawaii based financial company about Buzz Monitoring and we pulled up some crazy things from this forum and it's archives which is proving to be very powerful to local companies - good and bad.

              HawaiiThreads has been around long enough that the P2P referencing with Buzz Monitoring on Hawaii based companies has become more of an impact in cosumer searching than sponsored or PPC Google tactics. Let the peoples voice be heard.....
              Last edited by mel; April 21, 2008, 08:14 PM. Reason: fixed closed [/QUOTE] tag
              Aloha!

              Geebz

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

                Can newspapers survive? business is way down and so it can't be long before they're making us pay to read online, and I can't blame them one bit. I no longer subscribe to even any Sunday papers. I read several online. The rabid tree huggers will be dancing in the streets when hardcopy newspapers give up and go totally internet.

                It also shouldn't be too long before presidential candidates are promising a computer with internet in every home much like they used to promise a "chicken in every pot."
                Stop being lost in thought where our problems thrive.~

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

                  Print will only make it with fresh thinking and media integration and only then it will be an underlying theme.... Otherwise it will be a underground rag ala Terminator!
                  Aloha!

                  Geebz

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

                    Originally posted by Karen View Post
                    Can newspapers survive? business is way down and so it can't be long before they're making us pay to read online, and I can't blame them one bit. I no longer subscribe to even any Sunday papers. I read several online...
                    Ultimately, you can't charge for something that you can get somewhere else for free... And there will always be another revenue model that can be driven by another stream. Variety.com was one that could pull off a subscription service (albeit magazine). But in news, the sources are pretty much the same so the stories are similar.

                    I'm more in the belief of convergence as FCC regulations weaken. However, the media outlets must change their revenue models... Which may mean a change in operations and staffing. I'd like to believe that one-man bands or backpack journalists won't be the future... But that's the direction the papers are taking.

                    Do people care about quality? Can they even see/read/hear it?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

                      Originally posted by Karen View Post
                      Can newspapers survive? business is way down and so it can't be long before they're making us pay to read online, and I can't blame them one bit.
                      How much of their income is from subscriptions? I thought most of their income is in advertising. The subscription pays for the printing and delivery.

                      The bigger problem is to transition the advertising rates from subscription (which shows how many homes they are getting into) into web page "hits" and keep the revenue at the same level.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

                        So what are people looking for? Are they looking for light? Are they looking for depth? Are the looking for what they want to hear?

                        I still think there is a market for "gatekeepers" of knowledge. Orgnizations that filter through the buzz to find the truth. But then again, there are also extremes that attract markets as they fill the need of people to "belong."

                        As belief systems and "gatekeepers" keep building up, they further fractionalize the marketplace. This makes traditional media and advertising very difficult because now how to you get reach?

                        Radio is being hit hard with this as their market starts overlapping. As they push digital radio, they push multiple subchannels, allowing each large group to have all music to fit all demographics. So who ends up winning?

                        The papers are trying to defend themselves with video and more depth in news. But the overhead is too great so content becomes hard to develop. So they begin to look to social media to fill the gap. But is that the right direction? Do you trust that the fact checking is being done by your next door neighbor?

                        And TV? Their market is being squezed as everyone else tries to grab as much of everyone elses space as quickly as possible. And TV doesn't have the kind of staffing the papers have... Very lean in comparison.

                        So does it end up with some multi-media super group that will win? Or many small and divergent organizations that fill their little niches?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

                          Originally posted by GeckoGeek View Post
                          The bigger problem is to transition the advertising rates from subscription (which shows how many homes they are getting into) into web page "hits" and keep the revenue at the same level.
                          The way the papers are trying to flood their numbers is in the free distributions (Midweek and People). They also flood their volume with other web properties, hawaii.com is owned by the Advertiser.

                          But what is the effectiveness compared to cost?

                          And for the web, how to you rate success? uniques? visits? impressions? click-throughs? Or is their a webmeteric we don't know? And who do you believe? I've seen the numbers that media outlets put out in sales pieces that contradict what they give to their industry (Google knows all).

                          Quantcast? Alexa? Compete? Nielsen//Net Ratings?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

                            Gecko, the newspaper industry will not continue to give us their paper for free as more of us continue to refuse home delivery. At some point they'll have to charge a subscription rate for internet. I don't know if we can say "most" of their income is by advertisers when for many years most homes have taken a paper at least on Sundays. However, here's evidence their industry is hurting in advertising.

                            "NAA Reveals Biggest Ad Revenue Plunge in More Than 50 Years

                            By Jennifer Saba

                            Published: March 28, 2008 12:55 PM ET

                            NEW YORK The newspaper industry has experienced the worst drop in advertising revenue in more than 50 years.

                            According to new data released by the Newspaper Association of America, total print advertising revenue in 2007 plunged 9.4% to $42 billion compared to 2006 -- the most severe percent decline since the association started measuring advertising expenditures in 1950."


                            Oh! almost forgot the subscriber side and its proof of losses...

                            "Circulation falls at many major newspapers
                            Mon Nov 5, 2007 3:58pm EST
                            By Robert MacMillan

                            NEW YORK (Reuters) - Circulation fell at many U.S. newspapers in the six months to September, according to statistics released on Monday that for the first time include Internet readership in a bid by publishers to boost their attractiveness to advertisers.

                            Average daily paid circulation for newspapers printed Monday through Friday fell 2.6 percent and Sunday circulation fell 3.5 percent for the six-month period that ended September 30, 2007, compared with the year before, according to publishers' statistics released by the Audit Bureau of Circulations."
                            Stop being lost in thought where our problems thrive.~

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Print/TV/Radio AND The Internet

                              Originally posted by IslandBeef View Post
                              And for the web, how to you rate success? uniques? visits? impressions? click-throughs? Or is their a webmeteric we don't know? And who do you believe? I've seen the numbers that media outlets put out in sales pieces that contradict what they give to their industry (Google knows all).
                              You rate success on a number of things when it comes to the web, but it's the return community that really gages a sites worth/success. Just in how we are doing here on HT.

                              Unique, page views etc., are loosing value rapidly based on current CPM rates. Starting at $20 last year and down to $13 now. Reason: Cooperate buying organic community sites (MySpace & YouTube) and trying to apply old marketing to new technology.

                              Future success of the internet - Sociology before Technology
                              Aloha!

                              Geebz

                              Comment

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