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Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

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  • TuNnL
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Originally posted by Walkoff Balk View Post
    Is it the camera angle or does a KGMB anchor has a Max Hendroom size head?
    Ummmm.... I think you mean Max Headroom of the 1980s craze.

    Leave a comment:


  • Walkoff Balk
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Is it the camera angle or does a KGMB anchor has a Max Hendroom size head?

    Leave a comment:


  • gchun
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    More on Lisa Kubota in today's Honolulu Advertiser:

    http://www.honoluluadvertiser.com/ar...ING03/81203045

    gchun

    Leave a comment:


  • Walkoff Balk
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Originally posted by LikaNui View Post
    He's also a very humble guy, as opposed to Kim Gennaula, who called herself "a star" a couple of times last night.
    Mary Kathleen Gallagher called herself a superstar. Just about every pro athlete call himself a star.

    Leave a comment:


  • pumpkinboy
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Great job Kim and way to go putting your family first.

    You won't regret it, because you did the right thing!

    Leave a comment:


  • pumpkinboy
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Whether we like it or not, the news of today is a shadow of the news of yesterday.

    Entertainment/celebrities have mixed with what used to be hard "news," so much so that it's hard to tell the two apart.

    Just look at cnn.com's website and you'll see today's top stories and just below that, stories on the latest Hollywood gossip, what actor is doing what, etc...

    The lines have been blurred.

    What was once black and white is now gray.

    Leave a comment:


  • TuNnL
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Originally posted by Random View Post
    Congrats to Stacy Loe. Local girl, though I have yet to hear her speak pidgin (I know, it’s not professional for her career).
    Having grown up in Hawai‘i Kai, I don’t really think pidgin was too much a part of Stacy’s life during those critical “linguistics” years.

    Leave a comment:


  • anapuni808
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    (sorry - changed my mind about the post)
    Last edited by anapuni808; November 27, 2008, 09:53 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kalihiboy
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    The Goo Tire situation I thought was a year before he resigned. Anyways this is getting way off topic. And CV easily could have named the news director and producers involved in this but he chose not to, classy move on his part I think.

    For the record I have final newscasts of all the people I wrote about so in some ways the memories are clear to me because I've seen them all recently.

    Aj

    Leave a comment:


  • Honoruru
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Originally posted by Kalihiboy View Post
    Irony of it all is the people complaining seemed to have watched a large chunk or it themselves when they could have changed the channel all along.Aj
    I'm not really complaining (in fact, I did not actually see the broadcast). I realize that this is what "news" is today. I'm lamenting the fact that news is no longer just news.

    The Bob Sevey video that I saw highlights what I feel. He resigned because of what consultants recommended in order to get better ratings. Here is the text of his farewell:

    "On July 4th 1966, when I first sat down at the KGMB news desk, I had no idea I’d still be here 20 years later. … This job has
    given me the opportunity to meet and to know so many good people – newsmakers, news reporters and you the news viewers who have kept me in business night after night here at the same old stand. … And for my part I’ve tried to be honest with you, to let you know what was happening without letting you know what I thought about it. I wasn’t always successful in that either.

    But it was my goal; because that is what I think this job is all about. Now, for me, this job is done. And I have been amazed
    and overwhelmed at the reaction to my retirement announcement. My colleagues and my competitors in the news business
    have written and said so many nice things – especially the fella who does the same sort of work a few notches up the TV dial – Thanks, Joe. … Thanks too, to all of you who’ve been so thoughtful these last few days – for the leis and the bouquets and the baskets and the bottles and the letters and the calls and the good wishes. … My two heroes in this business, Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite had signatures. And I’d never been able to develop one. Murrow said, “Good night and good luck;” and Walter said, “And that’s the way it is.”

    And I think I’ll leave you tonight with a few lines of a song not too many people know – I’m not going to sing it, don’t worry. It goes back to the late 40’s in radio when the late Meredith Wilson wrote it as a theme for an NBC Radio Show called, TBS. … “May your troubles all be small ones and your fortunes ten times ten. May the good Lord bless and keep you until we meet again. Good night.”


    And the reason he resigned is even more appropriate. From Leslie Wilcox's PBS's 'Long Story Short":

    Leslie:
    And you weren’t of retirement age yet. Why did you leave?

    Shall I tell you the story about Goo’s Golden Tire Shop? I think I was sitting behind you at the time this all happened. But please do. It was about twenty minutes to six, and a great, huge column of black smoke appeared adjacent to Nimitz Highway. And we heard the fire radio say that there was a fire at Goo’s Golden Tire Shop. And we had the crash unit, the thing with the dish on it and everything, so we rolled that. And they got there pretty quick. And within the first five minutes of the, of the news broadcast, whoever the reporter was did a very credible job of telling us, ‘This is a whole bunch of tires that are on fire, there are no people involved, there are no injuries. There’s one little old lean-to in the middle that’s gonna burn up, but other than that, nothing else is in, in danger. It’s under control.’

    No concerns about air quality.
    The wind is blowing the smoke out to sea. Okay; I think we just did that story. About – I don’t know – ten, twelve minutes later, I’m told we’re going back to Goo’s Golden Tire Shop. Well, okay; all right. I mean, ‘cause there’s still a lot of black smoke, and maybe some people didn’t get the word. So we go back, and the reporter essentially does the same story, ‘cause there isn’t any other story. At this point, obviously, they haven’t figured out what started it; that’ll take time. And okay; we wrap that up. Now we’re in sports. Gary’s doing the sports. Linda and I were co-anchoring at the time. And the floor director relayed the message that we’re going back to Goo’s Golden Tire Shop again at the end of the broadcast. And I said, ‘No, we’re not.’ Linda got down and crawled under the anchor desk and ran into the control room to tell them, ‘No, we’re not.’ Well, the word was, ‘Yes, we are.’ The news director and the producer were both in accord; they were in the control room. We came back, and we had a monitor on a hydraulic lift. And all of a sudden, I heard the whir, and the monitor came up, and there was a picture of Goo’s Golden Tire Shop and the smoke – Meaning you as an anchor – you’d better talk about it, ‘cause it’s right there next to your head. And I did my fifteen seconds of weather, and said goodnight.
    And you were steaming.
    I was quite unhappy. But not as unhappy as were the news director and the producer, who were all over me like a bad rash.
    And the next day, I was summoned to the general manager’s office, and told that the producer was the final authority on the six o’clock broadcast, and I’d better understand that or else. And I explained that I had been the final authority on that broadcast for the last twenty years, we’d done fairly well, and no, I’m not going to accept that. And he made what I considered to be a threat, that I’d better, or else. So I went back and sat down, and wrote out my resignation, posted it on the board with two weeks notice. I had just signed a new, five-year contract. And the attorneys came flying out from Iowa to tell me that I couldn’t resign, because of my contract. And I reminded them that my attorney had written the contract; and yeah, I could resign. Yeah, it obviously cost me a lot of money, ‘cause I, I’m just quitting, two weeks. And uh, my last day was July 4, 1986 — twenty years to the day. Independence Day.
    Independence Day; yeah. And uh, and I’m kinda sorry.

    Leave a comment:


  • lavagal
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    I found it interesting that when I got up at 4:15 this morning, folks were wrapping up the Kim G. Luv Fest and tweeting their good nights. I bet she was up for 24 hours! I wonder how long she slept today?!

    Leave a comment:


  • scrivener
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Originally posted by Kalihiboy View Post
    Irony of it all is the people complaining seemed to have watched a large chunk or it themselves when they could have changed the channel all along.
    I can't explain it. I hated nearly every minute of it (hello, Mr. Mayor), yet I did watch each of the evening's three broadcasts in their entirety. On the one hand I know I could just have changed the station; on the other, I'm a pretty regular viewer, so I think that gives me a right to complain. I watch it when it's good and I watch it when it's lousy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kalihiboy
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    CV's 1986 finale was indeed 98% news of the day, only a short 3-5 minute video tribute from staff with their final goodbye's with old clips and then a short closing statement.

    Barbara Tanabe's finale in 1987 was similiar, mostly news and the last 5 minutes included clips from her career and Joe Moore coming on a rare weekend newscast to say goodbye to her and there were hugs and leis abound. The late Pat Patterson (sports) I think was the only other person on air that night.

    Leslie Wilcox 1992 KGMB farewell was quick and short too.

    Ditto on Bob Jones 1994 send off, difference then and now was they only devoted an X amount of time to the finale compared to Kim's sendoff. But it's yesterday's news, gone and over with already, I think someone who puts in 15 years with a station deserves a final on air goodbye, some people just have a problem with how long the goodbye should be. As someone suggested they could have done a half hour tribute to her that was only devoted to her farewell and then on the news they could have closed with a 5 minute goodbye.

    In general is it me or do they not do farewell tributes to people when they leave the station and head to a competitor??

    Irony of it all is the people complaining seemed to have watched a large chunk or it themselves when they could have changed the channel all along.

    Aj

    Leave a comment:


  • Leo Lakio
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    Originally posted by lavagal View Post
    Let's just hope Kim's new career choice is such a joy that she doesn't think it's a mistake in a few months and takes back her seat at the anchor desk.
    Well, especially if she and her husband did it on said desk.

    Wait --- I'm getting reality confused with scrivener's "fantasy," aren't I?

    Leave a comment:


  • Honoruru
    replied
    Re: Kim Gennaula says Aloha to KGMB and Hello to Kapiolani

    I was going to write a post here mentioning Bob Sevey's last broadcast, but Kimo beat me to it. I remember seeing a video of it online, but I couldn't find it when I did a search. It was short, sweet, simple, emotional, and most importantly, appropriate. If someone else can find it, post it here. I'd like to see it again.

    I guess I'm in the camp that believes that the news should be the news. If you want to have a special goodbye for a special employee, do a special program. But the news should be the news, plain and simple.

    (BTW, I know Kim; I worked with her years ago just before she went to KGMB. Best of luck, Kim.)

    Leave a comment:

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