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Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

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  • mel
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Bump.... so is Kokua Wireless still offering free public wifi. I recently visited their map... they had many hotspots listed but no users using them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bee
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Originally posted by Random View Post
    And this ad page will appear as pop-up? Can I block it?
    its a captive portal and redirect.

    you can try to block it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Random
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Originally posted by Bee View Post
    when you log on - you're greeted with an ad page. Then (for now) you have 60 minutes to go online. Then the cycel repeats. cost you nothing more than a click, but that's the only "catch".
    And this ad page will appear as pop-up? Can I block it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bee
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Originally posted by Random View Post
    Free wi-fi? So what's the catch?
    when you log on - you're greeted with an ad page. Then (for now) you have 60 minutes to go online. Then the cycel repeats. cost you nothing more than a click, but that's the only "catch".

    most of our access points are behind a content filter, since we don't want kiddies getting to porn. like you can @ Kahala Mall.

    Leave a comment:


  • Random
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Free wi-fi? So what's the catch?

    Leave a comment:


  • Bee
    replied
    we're also adding All Midas locations and Honolulu Zoo to our Mesh.

    thanks for following.

    Originally posted by pzarquon View Post
    What's the story? What happened to the Earthlink plan and infrastructure work it involved? What does Tri-Net get out of this?

    ETA: Ah, "breaking news" indeed. Looks like the Star-Bulletin had much more of the story this morning. So Earthlink did pull out at the same time it dropped other cities' projects. And Tri-Net has the intention to generate revenue, and has some vague ideas about how to do so.
    Earthlink (like us) wanted access to the streetlights - that however is not the case (longer story).

    Tri-net intentions are to give back (community service) as well as make it self-sustaining. If we can generate revenue from ads (the 1 welcome page) then the revnue will go into growing the network. we'd like to get Kuhio Park Terrace next.

    And Actually Kokua Wireless is now its own company (hopefully to become a non-profit). but we don't have enough experience in that yet. Our missions would be to "give free internet to low income areas".

    Leave a comment:


  • Glen Miyashiro
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Here's their web site: http://www.kokuawireless.com/. They have a Google Map showing all their nodes.

    Not all of them are in Chinatown! I was intrigued to see two nodes out in a residential part of Kāneʻohe. Then I noticed their labels: "Kaneohe-Nakaoka-32c6" and "Kaneohe-Nakaoka-6fd7". I'm guessing that they're at the home of Aryn Nakaoka of Tri-Net, the Kokua Wireless ISP.
    Last edited by Glen Miyashiro; October 4, 2007, 01:58 PM.

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  • lavagal
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    I work in the area, so I tried today but didn't get on. I thought maybe, you know, soft opening or something. Only one at the moment is called UofM wireless.

    Leave a comment:


  • pzarquon
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    I've been trying to get updates on this project for months. Especially earlier this year, when other municipal wireless initiatives elsewhere in the country ran into trouble or got canceled completely (specifically, those in partnership with Earthlink). Then, this "breaking news" update:

    City hooks Chinatown up with free wireless Internet
    Honolulu's plan to offer free wireless Internet access in Chinatown is online. The city wants to test the "Kokua Wireless" project in Chinatown first and then expand the service to the rest of Honolulu.
    Except, no mention of Earthlink, and now the provider is Tri-Net. And even though the city has more than enough infrastructure and property throughout Chinatown to install nodes, this new setup requires area businesses to volunteer to host them.

    What's the story? What happened to the Earthlink plan and infrastructure work it involved? What does Tri-Net get out of this?

    ETA: Ah, "breaking news" indeed. Looks like the Star-Bulletin had much more of the story this morning. So Earthlink did pull out at the same time it dropped other cities' projects. And Tri-Net has the intention to generate revenue, and has some vague ideas about how to do so.
    Last edited by pzarquon; October 4, 2007, 10:18 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Palolo Joe
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Originally posted by pzarquon View Post
    The partnership with the city implies that some city information and services will be delivered or emphasized, and of course the provider will make some money on advertising... or just start charging after everyone's hooked.
    That's why I wasn't too excited when I first read about this. Sure, it's free for the first year, but I get the feeling that Earthlink will start charging for access after the initial trial run.

    I do like the idea of municipal broadband.

    Leave a comment:


  • pzarquon
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Yep. Though most skew toward Bishop Street (versus Chinatown) and reach only a few yards around the storefront. I should probably post a few of those to the general free wireless thread.

    But "municipal wireless" is big news for lots of folks (and bad news for pay-to-access wireless business models). It adds more weight to the idea that the Internet is a tool or utility that benefits the public good and shouldn't only be available to subscribers to private networks. It covers a lot of territory, and presumably one could maintain a connection moving about a large area rather than seeking out the nearest network on each block. The partnership with the city implies that some city information and services will be delivered or emphasized, and of course the provider will make some money on advertising... or just start charging after everyone's hooked.

    Leave a comment:


  • Palolo Joe
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Aren't there a number of businesses that already provide free wireless access downtown?

    Leave a comment:


  • pzarquon
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Chinatown Wi-Fi plan delayed until next year
    A plan to offer free Wi-Fi wireless Internet access in Chinatown has been pushed back until next year as officials with Honolulu and EarthLink finalize contractual terms covering the project.
    Bummer.

    Interestingly, some friends and I have already noticed apparently related Wi-Fi networks around town with seemingly random numerical SSIDs that provide open 'net access. So either part of the Earthlink network is already running, or someone else is up to something.

    Leave a comment:


  • craigwatanabe
    replied
    Re: Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Originally posted by pzarquon
    Finally, an interesting comment:I wonder how the blacklist will be managed? How conservative will the policy be?

    Probably restricted to those who voted

    Leave a comment:


  • pzarquon
    started a topic Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    Free Wi-Fi in Chinatown

    As Craig noted in the "Free wireless places" thread, all of Chinatown in downtown Honolulu will become a WiFi hotspot later this summer, free for a year. It's a partnership between the city, HECO, and Earthlink. Here's the article in Pacific Business News, and Mayor Mufi Hanneman's official announcement.

    A pretty decent swath of downtown -- Fort Street to River Street, Nimitz Highway to Beretania Street. Though I wonder why the area skews west, and doesn't cover the business district east of Fort Street (Bishop Street, Alakea, even the Capitol district). Ease of deployment? Building densities? Possible conflicts with existing corporate and government networks?

    And... anyone know when "later this summer" might actually be?

    I wonder what effect the plan will have on those that currently, or planned to, offer paid wireless access downtown? I wonder what the implications are for businesses that might not neccessarily want reachable signals within their walls?

    Finally, an interesting comment:
    "There might be some restrictions as to which sites people can visit to protect the public," [city CIO Gordon] Bruce said. "But basically, they'll be able to surf the Web as if they were at home."
    I wonder how the blacklist will be managed? How conservative will the policy be?
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