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  • Miulang
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    I searched around and found out what games were played by the ancient kanaka maoli. Here are some of them:

    Hei, or shaping images from string, was a favorite pastime. Usually at the same time as the figure was being shaped a story about the figure would be chanted.

    Tops made from kukui nuts were twirled to see whose top spun the longest. Stalks of ki leaves or the butt ends of coconut leaves were used for sliding down hillsides. Children made toy canoes from coconut bloom sheaths and floated them downstream.

    ... Kites were made as "bird" kites with wings, crescent-shaped "moon" kites, "star" kites with six points and round "sun" kites. Juggling games were played, most often by children who chanted as they tossed lau hala balls into the air.

    Pala'ie was a ball and loop game. The handle was moved so that the ball made a complete circle as it swung, striking the loop from both above and below.

    ...Kōnane was a popular game somewhat similar to modern checkers. Markers were small black beach pebbles and white shells or pieces of coral.

    ...No'a and pūhenehene were guessing games where small objects were hidden.
    During Makahiki season, the following were played:

    hākōkō, or wrestling while standing; hukihuki, or tug-of-war; kākā lā 'au, or fencing with spears; kula kula'i, or chest pushing; and uma, or hand wrestling.

    ...Girls took part in hākōkō noho, or wrestling while seated; kula'i wāwae, or foot pushing and loulou, or pulling hooked fingers.

    ...only men played the bowling game called 'ulu maika. At first bowling was done with a thick disk cut from a green 'ulu, or breadfruit.

    ...Other games of skill for men were ihe pahe'e, or spear sliding; kākā lā 'au, or fencing with spears; moa pahe'e, or dart sliding; and 'ō 'ō ihe, or spear throwing.

    ...People went into the ocean for diving, canoe paddling, surfing and swimming. Some games were played only by the ali'i and were kapu for everyone else. Hōlua sledding was a sport only for the young male and female ali'i.

    ...Another game only played by ali'i used bows and arrows and was called pana 'iole, or rat shoot. It was played in a field or a small circular area enclosed by a low wall.
    Many of these ancient sports are similar to competitions at the Olympic Games in modern times. Can you imagine having a "Hawaiian Bobsled Team" (hey, if the Jamaicans could do it, why not the Hawaiians? ) Or competing in javelin throwing or distance running or boxing or wrestling?

    The kanaka maoli of ancient times were vigorous, hardy people who enjoyed physical activity and being outdoors.

    Miulang

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  • damontucker
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Originally posted by Pua'i Mana'o View Post
    there is no ass to give a rat, because football is not a Hawaiian sport, and the idea of "mascots" isn't a Hawaiian concept.

    Now, while my panties doesn't twist up too tightly because of appropriating somebody's personal latterday mele like it did when Disney/Mark Ho'omalu used "He Mele No Kalakaua" for "He Mele No Lilo", which means that Disney owns the f***ing rights to a Hawaiian chant for our ali'i, I do see where Louisa is coming from.

    I believe that the onus is upon those kanaka on the UH payroll to come up with something more appropriate for their fellow fb team.
    Originally posted by manoasurfer123 View Post
    So then when did Universities and Colleges become a "Hawaiian" thing?
    Originally posted by Miulang View Post
    I dunno why that date would be significant in the world of Hawai'i athletics (I don't really unnerstand Manoa's question to begin with )
    Miulang
    I was just questioning Pua'i assertion that football doesn't have anything to do with Hawaiian Concepts...
    So I was asking anyone out there that might have knowledge...

    What do Universities and Colleges have to do with Hawaiian Customs?

    If we are taking Football to the Hawaiian Connection... why not tie in the whole University and College to the question?

    Are universities and colleges Hawaiian?

    Leave a comment:


  • Miulang
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Originally posted by craigwatanabe View Post
    October 14th, 1956 at around 2pm...nah!!! I dont know but I bet you was ready to google that date yeah Miulang?
    I dunno why that date would be significant in the world of Hawai'i athletics (I don't really unnerstand Manoa's question to begin with ) but I did find this rather amusing story in a Gay/Lesbian/Transgender newspaper in Vermont about why the "Rainbow" part of the Rainbow Warriors nickname was dropped:

    Hawaii logo

    HONOLULU – The rainbow has fallen at the University of Hawaii.

    The rainbow has been the symbol and nickname for the Hawaii football team for 77 years.

    But because the rainbow has also become the symbol of gays and lesbians around the world, the school’s athletics director said was a factor in a decision to drop the rainbow from school logos and the football team’s name.

    “That logo really put a stigma on our program at times in regards to it’s part of the gay community, their flags and so forth,” Hugh Yoshida said after the new, Polynesian-style “H” logo was unveiled, replacing the old logo, which had the letters UH and a rainbow.

    Now the university is being accused of homophobia by gay and lesbian groups and being criticized by some native Hawaiians for renaming the football team the Warriors.

    “A statement like that I can understand coming from student-athletes, but to come from the athletic director, I am surprised and disappointed,” said Ken Miller of the Gay and Lesbian Community Center.

    Yoshida, who earlier said his comments were taken out of context, issued a statement apologizing to anyone he may have offended.

    “I understand why some people might consider some of the comments to be derogatory, even if no harm was intended,” Yoshida said. “We remain committed to our policies on diversity and inclusiveness
    Miulang

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  • craigwatanabe
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Originally posted by manoasurfer123 View Post
    So then when did Universities and Colleges become a "Hawaiian" thing?
    October 14th, 1956 at around 2pm...nah!!! I dont know but I bet you was ready to google that date yeah Miulang?

    Leave a comment:


  • damontucker
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    So then when did Universities and Colleges become a "Hawaiian" thing?

    Leave a comment:


  • Pua'i Mana'o
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    there is no ass to give a rat, because football is not a Hawaiian sport, and the idea of "mascots" isn't a Hawaiian concept.

    Now, while my panties doesn't twist up too tightly because of appropriating somebody's personal latterday mele like it did when Disney/Mark Ho'omalu used "He Mele No Kalakaua" for "He Mele No Lilo", which means that Disney owns the f***ing rights to a Hawaiian chant for our ali'i, I do see where Louisa is coming from.

    I believe that the onus is upon those kanaka on the UH payroll to come up with something more appropriate for their fellow fb team.

    Leave a comment:


  • damontucker
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Guess no one gives a rats butt that Vili is not a Hawaiian Warrior either?

    Leave a comment:


  • TuNnL
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Originally posted by Jonah K View Post
    Knowing the personalities involved, it's somewhat unlikely that the UH Center for Hawaiian Studies would do anything of its own volition for the UH Athletic Department.
    ...except REMOVE the Hawaiian warrior in favor of a Polynesian dancer with a penchant for pissing off opposing teams. Was the original Warrior an ali‘i? Sure. Disrespectful to have him as the mascot? Maybe. But at least he was Hawaiian. Or are all ‘them natives’ the same? That’s the message I got.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pua'i Mana'o
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    I freely confess my ignorance when it comes to UHM professors and their politics. Who can keep up?

    Leave a comment:


  • Jonah K
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Originally posted by Pua'i Mana'o View Post
    I thought that the UH has a Hawaiian Studies department and access to many capable of creating an appropriate chant and dance. Why this hasn't happened I do not know. Perhaps making the point as you did will call the UH HS department to their duty to support their fellow UH program and rectify the matter with their own Hawaiian chant and dance.
    Knowing the personalities involved, it's somewhat unlikely that the UH Center for Hawaiian Studies would do anything of its own volition for the UH Athletic Department. However, if someone from the UH Athletic Department asks the UH Center for Pacific Islands Studies for assistance, something can probably be worked out.

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  • damontucker
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Haka is the generic name for all Maori dance. Today, haka is defined as that part of the Maori dance repertoire where the men are to the fore with the women lending vocal support in the rear. Most haka seen today are haka taparahi, haka without weapons.
    The haka adds a unique component, derived from the indigenous Maori of New Zealand, and which aligns with the wider Polynesian cultures of the Pacific. The All Blacks perform the haka with precision and intensity which underpin the All Black approach.
    http://www.allblacks.com
    Rugby teams perform the Haka and Rugby is not derived from there.

    So why can't the UH Warrior members that are Polynesian perform a "UH Warrior approach"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZCky1H_fiU

    How many haoles do you see?
    Last edited by damontucker; December 6, 2006, 11:52 AM. Reason: Thank you Nachodaddy for referring me to the Allblack website

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  • Pua'i Mana'o
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Louisa, your point is well-taken, but to whom you direct your ire is misguided.

    Football is not a Hawaiian sport. The UH is not administered by a Hawaiian entity. None of the football heads are Hawaiians (I am willing to be corrected if I am wrong about this tidbit). Aim your stones at the UH football program, NOT native Hawaiians for coopting your heritage. Now, for that claim to be valid, it would take something like our Merrie Monarch festival being opened with a haka, but believe you me, before any Maori would have a chance to ring the alarm, the Hawaiians would be tossing victims off the pali for such sacrilege.

    As a kanaka, I recall recoiling when I first saw the UH haka on television. I wondered if they had been granted permission by the All Blacks to use a chant that was written expressly for them. I thought that the UH has a Hawaiian Studies department and access to many capable of creating an appropriate chant and dance. Why this hasn't happened I do not know. Perhaps making the point as you did will call the UH HS department to their duty to support their fellow UH program and rectify the matter with their own Hawaiian chant and dance.

    Leave a comment:


  • lavagal
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    I was seeing this on TV news following the Purdue game. Frankly, I was embarrassed by it. Something didn't quite ring true. I didn't know what it was, but it just didn't feel solidly like they should be doing it. I agree that creating their own ritual dance would be a better way of going about this. Sure, there are plenty of players from all over Oceania, so it would probably be a blend or hybrid result, but distinctly their own.

    That is one of the things I find offensive about "Jawaiian" or local kids who dress/do hip hop stuff. Why latch onto a flawed identity when you already have something worthwhile you could perpetuate?

    I digress.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Hawaii is a fake "ripoff" culture. Everything about modern "Hawaiianism" and "localism" is fake. We enjoy stealing as long as it makes us feel more "local", more "islander".

    We love it when "our" warriors do their dance because it makes us feel more "Hawaiian" than the fans of say "Boise". The fact that its all a fake act based upon a stolen dance doesn't matter.

    See?

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  • TuNnL
    replied
    Re: UH Haka

    Wow. I had no idea!

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