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Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

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  • DKP
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    This isn't to anyone in particular. Here's my experience, perspective, and suggestions.

    Kamehameha was the only institution with Hawaiian culture courses integrated into the general curriculum at the time I was going to intermediate (v. few immersion schools, parents would not allow me because still 'experimental'.) I couldn't get into 6th (was it?) grade Kamehameha.

    I did well on the tests, all A's and B's. I thought I was charismatic during the interview...but...when the interviewer asked what sports I play at St. Patrick's...I told her..."I used to play organized v.ball, basketball, tennis, and soccer outside of school. I gave it all up to focus on surfing, and will be doing contests when I am ready." She replied, "But not in school right?" I said, "No. They want to start something up but can't pay for liability." She then replied, "So no sports, then?". I'm already sweating because this is b.s. to me, so I tell her "Well, not in that sense. But...isn't surfing one of the most Hawaiian sports?" She didn't put it on my app.

    I didn't get in. Part of that was because I was always living in Honolulu, and they weren't brining in many more from here at the time. Not enough spots. I couldn't learn it from parents. Dad is Pukiki, mom is mostly Hawaiian but moved to O'ahu at young age w/adopted parents who didn't know culture. She's been working two jobs since she graduated, as did dad. Their financial situations didn't leave much time for cultural enrichment.

    I ended up attending public school. While there, I was not able, in my four years, to secure a spot in any olelo or cultural courses...with the exception of Polynesian Music (which I already knew). Too many students of all ethnicities were wanting to learn the culture already.

    I'm not the only one with a situation like this.

    Luckily, nowadays, there are many more sources (though I am saving for college at the moment to learn the culture), so I'm using the internet. My Hawaiian side all live on outer islands, so that learning channel was/is out till my financial future improves (new job lined up, just waiting to start).

    So...in light of all this, I feel nothing for the lawsuit happy non-Hawaiian childrens' parents. As we speak, lawyers are putting out notices to haole parents to get their kids to apply and agree to suit. I can't stand some of the techniques some attorneys use.

    And about the word haole (since there is alot of talk about the word in Hawai'i right now), I was taught it to mean foreigner. So I would be considered hapa. It's not a bad or good thing...it just is. I've no problem being hapa haole. At the time of its invention, there were mostly pacific islanders around. The word meant anyone but them. I was taught it to mean so in the classification sense, not in the derogatory sense. Ex. 'haole koa', to me doesn't mean 'f*cking dumb koa tree' like how some jerks misuse the word towards people nowadays...it pertains to a tree whose roots (genetics) are not of here. Why pretend? I don't think the tree is ashamed of where it originated from. That's how I was taught it...that's how I'll use it. I'm not going to let the ways others use it change my kupuna definition of the word. Take it as you wish.

    That being said...

    Some talk about haole being excluded and having racism practiced against them...well I'm part-Hawaiian and the opening of the school to all would essentially be predujiced towards people like me (part-Hawaiian). Indirect predujice...knowing what the effect would be (depriving a number of Hawaiians of culture that they could be learning in this school), and still supporting groups like 'Aloha' For 'All' (the organization...don't even get me started on them). Vultures, that's all they really are, because for them, it all comes down to money and status. What college will they go to? Which will lead to, what Mercedes will they drive? The culture aspect of things...anyone?

    Some say we're teaching the kids prejudice. I say...have them learn Hawaiian and local history. Tell them study the time period and the business/population trends. Tell um to read Land and Power in Hawai'i, Hawai'i-s Story, and every other book they can. Let them decide what it is. Sure, on face value, it seems that way. Dig deeper and your perspective may change.

    Oh wait...if I did that there'll be even less spots in public high school Hawaiian History.

    It IS a stepping stone towards dimantling O.H.A. and D.H.H.L. Get rid of O.H.A., and who will care to take care of cultural areas (not to mention, out bidding speculators to preserve them)? Sure as hell not the state. They can't even find enough archaeologists/anthropologists/cultural consultants. Waimea was a success story, and couldn't have been done without them (not to take credit away from the other groups who pitched in). You guys know it was so close to becoming an amusement park? The last intact ahupua'a on the island, now. Piss me off, the nerve of some speculators.

    Before Ken Conklin and his henchpeople come in and say something along the lines of, 'Didn't ancient leaders abolish the old religion/practices? Why keep them. Dig um up. Put up a parking lot! We need another mall.', they should understand that not all families gave it up, nor care to. Not all families in Hawai'i integrated into modern American society, nor care to, either. People like them care about these places. Also, many from any race/ethnic group interested in Hawaiian culture in general also care.

    D.H.H.L. is now headed in the right direction. Nobody gets free anything like some people think. You get loans and a lease agreement, which isn't exactly how it was created. They should dismantle and give as much on the list (some died waiting for the promise to be fullfilled) fee simple. If the parents got a place to live, so will successive generations. None of this lease crap. If you want to see the corruption that starts from the Dept. of Interior all they way down to current leasee's of D.H.H.L., check out The Wall Street Journal Article: 'Broken Promise: How Everyone Got Hawaiians' Homelands Except Hawaiians'. It's an older article and you might have to pay to read (sorry, no time to scan it to webspace to share for free, right now). Look what currently exists on lands meant for those on the list.

    Oh yeah...and there are at least twice as much funds available for other racially-exclusive scholarships. They are privately funded so I doubt they'll ever be challenged. Check out how many there are for Japanese-Americans, Filipino-Amer., African-Amer., etc. Blood is required for these as well. I don't qualify for these, and there is much more money for other ethnic groups than what O.H.A. could (but won't) give me ($500). Anyone attacking these other organizations? Hey 'Project 21'...let's see you attack African-American only funds...equality is what you guys stand for, right?

    All parents are teaching children who were in situations like mine is, if you got money (for 'donations'), you get accepted.

    If you're family is 'clever' enough to sue, you might get in. Go ahead, teach um to sue. Look at the family of the guy who drowned at Seven Sacred Pools and got 2 mil. There are buoys now? Shouldn't even be swimming at certain times there to begin with. It's not just sacred because of legend, but also because the place demands respect. And if the blowhole by Sandy's takes someone out, they deserve to be taken out. How many signs do they need? Do they really need a sign, or someone to slap them in the face if they get too close? Ah...lawsuits. It's the new doctorate degree.

    If not, get a library card for cultural cravings.

    Study hard cause you're gonna need merit-based scholarships...and get a job during high school and save...and work in college to cover the difference. Interest is not an interesting thing to be paying.

    I'd rather teach keiki about a great woman and her husband who recognized the need of the children around her to get an affordable, high-class, and culturally-integrated education, so they could compete against those with wealth from other parts of the world. I think she was trying to keep them from succumbing to the 'replacement-effect' that's happened and continues on in most Poly/Micro/Melanesian island groups (the wealthy replacing the indigenous).

    I say Kamehameha should take care of those of blood who FAIL the test, first. There the ones who need well-utilized education funding the most.

    Then take care of low-income and ones with domestic problems of blood, second.

    Then the already 'intelligent' of blood, then the wealthy of blood (regardless of academic achievement), then everyone else.

    True societal leaders don't need to be trained by that school, because they will do well in other schools. Most already have a proper learning environment, why should they be chosen first?

    Again, just my perspective. Don't mean to offend. It might sound blunt but I am still learning how to convey my tone through typing.
    Last edited by DKP; July 14, 2007, 10:54 AM.

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  • Lei K
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Originally posted by Pua'i Mana'o View Post
    Ladies, for real, what are you talking about?
    Aloha? Lots of talk here about the meaning of aloha and who has it/doesn't have it. I just wanted to let Mililani know I was feeling what she said. Otherwise, I wasn't talking about much of anything, I'm good at that.

    *going back to my corner now to watch da beeg keeds play*

    Leave a comment:


  • Pua'i Mana'o
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Ladies, for real, what are you talking about?

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  • Lei K
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Originally posted by Mililani View Post
    As for the "ALOHA" people speak of.. it's been abused time and time again. You would hope someday the hawaiian people will wake up and say, "I gave you everything I have, and even more, yet even though I have nothing left, you still want more. I have nothing more to give." Now, that would be sweet!
    Indeed. Indeed. Indeed.

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  • Pua'i Mana'o
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    *blinks at this thread for a reaaaalllly long time*

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  • Peshkwe
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    1. Jack up the price of tuition.

    2. open the school to everybody at full tuition.

    3. Set up scholarships for students who's families who were Kingdom of Hawaii citizens (not citizens of another country living in Hawaii) by the date the Princess was born.

    4. Tier the scholarships based on need, (poorest students who meet the requirements get close to a full ride) as well as generational residency.

    Yes there is a possibility that there would be some fully non-Hawaiian that could be eligible for a free ride, but then that would be the luck of the draw based on Kingdom citizenship, generational residency and need.

    If a non-Hawaiian student wants in and doesn't fit the scholarship requirements and the family can pay the full tuition, then all she/he has to pass would be educational requirements...one of which could very well be a certain grade level based proficiency with the Hawaiian language and knowledge of culture and history.

    Doing this would pretty much guarantee that the majority of students would be of Kanaka blood since, if I recall correctly, not many of the missionary/corporate types became full citizens of the Kingdom of Hawaii at that time. It'd also be following the will by giving preference to Hawaiian children since it would no longer be based on race but on a connection to the Kingdom and family who swore fealty to the national entity known as Hawaii.
    Last edited by Peshkwe; May 28, 2007, 05:15 PM. Reason: adda thought

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  • Mililani
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    IMHO......

    Originally posted by WindwardOahuRN View Post
    That statement could so easily be flipped around to apply to KS.

    Just where is the "aloha" in discrimination? In ANY form of discrimination, practiced with ANY so-called "justification"?

    Or maybe we could flip it again? The princess did not say to discriminate, she said to give preference. The non-hawaiians decided to call it discrimination. The Will does not say non-hawaiian's cannot be admitted, so where's the discrimination? We even had a recent non-hawaiian graduate.

    As for the "ALOHA" people speak of.. it's been abused time and time again. You would hope someday the hawaiian people will wake up and say, "I gave you everything I have, and even more, yet even though I have nothing left, you still want more. I have nothing more to give." Now, that would be sweet!

    Oh well, that's my 2 cents, cause that's about all it'll probably be worth.

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  • TuNnL
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Originally posted by timkona View Post
    First of all, when folks get to buy out their lease, it usually means property ownership is passing from big institutions (like govt) to the little guy. That is a good thing
    This is the most utter and complete representation of your mainland mentality, Tim. The biggest property owners in Hawai‘i are KSBE and Campbell Estate. The most public “mandatory lease-to-fee” conversion battles have all been private property owners NOT “govt.” The most recent being a charitable organization that benefits orphans and destitute keiki. These are the good people being forced to sell.

    Duh, Tim.

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  • timkona
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    First of all, when folks get to buy out their lease, it usually means property ownership is passing from big institutions (like govt) to the little guy. That is a good thing TuNnL. So don't paint me with the big govt brush. You know me better than that.

    As for the one culture comment, I would say it's more like a bunch of cultures all mingling and mixing and growing and changing over time. Love causes cultures to overlap sometimes. Hawaiians started playing ukulele. Now part of the culture. Never had ukulele till the podagee's brought 'em. Same with religions. Changing over time. Even foods play a role in the mixing and changing. And with modern global travel/communication, it happens even faster.

    It is important to remember that culture and race are decidedly different concepts. One does not either preclude, nor exclude the other. The perpetuation of a culture is not dependent upon race. Culture comes from social interaction, and Grandma and Grandpa.

    RN's link was interesting. I guess the 14th Amendment is the root of what we are discussing in this thread. Racial tensions will ease as the generations pass, and the children are more intermingled. As for the other school's, I guess it bothers me less when it is gender based, and I don't think the Catholic schools necessarily exlude applicants for religion, but rather force a little God as a condition of attending. I need to chew on that a little more.

    Seems to me that the 2 words, exclusion and aloha, are opposites. Aloha.

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  • WindwardOahuRN
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Originally posted by Ms_Aloha_Nui View Post
    Shouldn't the Will and its contents be honored forever?
    Not necessarily. Note the case of Stephen Girard, founder of Girard College in Pennsylvania. His will left a fund for the operation of a college for "poor white male orphans." That was way back in 1831.

    Guess what happened over a century later:

    http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/script...=353&invol=230

    Though the circumstances differ from the KS situation it just goes to show that wills do not always stand up to the test of time.

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  • poinographer
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Anybody else have comments regarding the op-eds that ran today from Rosen?

    Here are mine.

    Leave a comment:


  • WindwardOahuRN
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Originally posted by TuNnL View Post
    Could it be because the haole way is to value rules over aloha?
    That statement could so easily be flipped around to apply to KS.

    Just where is the "aloha" in discrimination? In ANY form of discrimination, practiced with ANY so-called "justification"?

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  • Random
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Originally posted by TuNnL View Post
    Could it be because the haole way is to value rules over aloha?
    Better to conquer you by law than by force.

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  • TuNnL
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    Originally posted by timkona View Post
    Does it matter if the will was set up using a concept that was legal at the time, and then deemed to be illegal in the future?
    Again Tim, and this is growing tiresome, you can answer your own question by taking a look around you. Does St. Louis School discriminate against girls by giving overwhelming preference to boys? Does St. Andrew’s Priory discriminate against boys by giving overwhelming preference to girls? Does Maryknoll School discriminate against Buddhists by giving overwhelming preference to Catholics?

    Realize that you are taking on a formidable array of private schools with a longstanding tradition of discrimination — all of whom have no intention of changing just because you would like to bestow your homogenized system on their admissions policy. I noticed you are really big on “government intrusion” (i.e. your support of mandatory lease-to-fee conversion, your grand ideals of “one culture,” etc.)

    Could it be because the haole way is to value rules over aloha?

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  • Menehune Man
    replied
    Re: Kamehameha Schools Admissions Policy - Chapter 3

    We're all born of a mother, having no choice of any factors involved.
    From that stand point... we're all human beings of planet earth.

    The "I'm Better", "Different", "Discriminated against", or...

    Are all "Stupid Human Behavior".

    Granted some are luckier than others, but that's not truly based on race.
    We're all in this together. And have to work at it.

    This being said (by little ol' me) "I still feel that since Mrs. Pauahi Bishop was heir to the Kamehameha lands and heirlooms, having made a will to benefit certain individuals she had a heart for, is the most proper thing imaginable.

    I wish and hope that Pauahi's will is taken upon her intent.
    If it's not being done so, then that's wrong in my opinion.

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