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Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

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  • Glen Miyashiro
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    Originally posted by Miulang
    In Hawai'i especially, there were reasons why the kanaka maoli built in certain places and avoided others. It was mostly because through their history, they observed nature and learned where the safe land was. Too bad we can't learn from history.
    However, keep in mind that our view of the ancient Hawaiians is blurred by the mists of history. People can be stupid no matter when or where they are. It wouldn't surprise me at all to learn that some idiot kahuna had a heiau built on a steep hill that collapsed. We just wouldn't have heard about it, a thousand years later.

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  • Miulang
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    The irresistable building lots are also the ones that command higher prices (including insurance rates, etc). In this case, it really is true that you get what you pay for, and then some.

    I still don't understand why people insist on building on the sides of hills. Is having a view really worth running the risk of having your life and/or your property in peril everytime a heavy rain happens?

    By the same token, beachfront properties run the risk of getting flooded out during tsunamis and extreme high tides, and yet people still pay top bucks.

    Call me a stick in the mud, but let me find someplace that's on level ground, with low potential for flooding or other natural disasters.

    In Hawai'i especially, there were reasons why the kanaka maoli built in certain places and avoided others. It was mostly because through their history, they observed nature and learned where the safe land was. Too bad we can't learn from history.

    My parents have a second home in Kula. They had a vacant lot (a gully, actually), that was empty until about a year ago, when a local doctor and his wife bought the parcel (probably cost them an arm and a leg for a ravine!), spent even more money filling in the ravine, put in structural reinforcements and then put up a huge house on top of it (probably at least another $4-500k). My guess is that even with all the enhancements, they're going to run into problems with water because, after all, the ravine was caused by runoffs from the hill above...

    Miulang

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  • pzarquon
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    This is just a guess, but I'd say yes. I mean, a valley is just about the perfect place for habitation. Protection from the elements, water supply for irrigation, defendable (in the case of conflict)... heck, didn't the basic dividing lines for defining districts fall along valleys?

    It ain't overpopulation. Valleys are attractive. Just like beaches, or the edges of cliffs. They're not the brightest places to build, but they're irresistable ones.

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  • alohabear
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    Originally posted by Glen Miyashiro
    Unlikely. It's probably more because more houses are being built in vulnerable areas at the base of steep slopes.
    Why do they build in vulnerable areas? Overpopulation! No other island uses valleys( where the rain drains) like O'ahu does. Did the ancient Hawaiians live in valleys?

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  • 1stwahine
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    Originally posted by pzarquon
    Far as I know, few of us here are hard of hearing.
    Learn something everyday. Thanks. Internet Etiquette from Leo, now I know. No CAPS unless emphasizing or shouting. I got it. Does it apply to Bloggs as well? Mahalo.

    Leave a comment:


  • pzarquon
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    Far as I know, few of us here are hard of hearing.

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  • 1stwahine
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    IT'S DA BONES! DA BONES...DEY WEN DESECRATE DEM BONES! WATCH OUT IF YOU LIVE BY MOUNTAINS, MORE BOULDRES GOIN FALL. BURY DEM BONES AND PROSECUTE THOSE WHO ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR DESECRATING ,GLUING AND MARKING...DEM BONES!

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  • 808blogger
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    Originally posted by pzarquon

    So, instead, you might say, Oahu's overpopulation is increasing the risks of rockfalls. Just like human nature's tendency to migrate toward shorelines is increasing the risks of ocean and flooding disasters.
    No....
    you might say...
    "Oahu's increased population has led to a higher chance of human rockfall exposure"

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  • pzarquon
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    Exactly. While I am sure development has a measurable impact on the local geology - changing drainage patterns, shifting water tables, outright moving whole mountains - I'd say that the reason more houses are being damaged and the reason more people are being hurt is because of the increasing number of houses and people in close proximity to rockfalls.

    That is, the rocks always fell. Now we're more likely to be under them.

    So, instead, you might say, Oahu's overpopulation is increasing the risks of rockfalls. Just like human nature's tendency to migrate toward shorelines is increasing the risks of ocean and flooding disasters.

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  • Glen Miyashiro
    replied
    Re: Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    Unlikely. It's probably more because more houses are being built in vulnerable areas at the base of steep slopes.

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  • alohabear
    started a topic Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    Is O'ahu's overpopulation causing rockfalls?

    It seems to me that a lot of large boulders fall off the mountains on O'ahu lately.
    Why is this? 30 years ago you hardly heard of this happening.It seems to me that as the population grows and the aina shrinks more large rocks and floods occur. My guess is that all the natural drainage gets "put somewhere else" and water from storms loosen rocks ...flows un-naturally and disaster is a possibility.
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