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  • Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

    Two scientists at the University of Nevada created a list of the 10 states that have the greatest magnitude earthquakes every year, and Hawai'i is #5, with an average magnitude of 5.0. WA is right behind at 4.97.

    WA will probably suffer a more cataclysmic earthquake sometime in the very near future, but Hawai'i apparently also has some fairly significant earthquake activity. WA residents are taught from school age on what to do if they are caught in an earthquake. Are the citizens of Hawai'i also becoming more educated on what they need to do to protect themselves and their property?

    Miulang
    Last edited by Miulang; November 21, 2006, 07:13 PM.
    "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

  • #2
    Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

    I don't think we do. Every time it rains, traffic is at a standstill. When the power goes out, everyone freaks out. When the ambulance needs to race by on the freeway, a bunch of idiots dive in behind it to ride in its draft. Probably the only thing we do right is stock up on toilet paper, bottled water and canned meats. We reelect deadwood. We pull up to the pump even as gas prices soar. If there were any state in the union where it should be easy to handle life off the grid for a couple of weeks, it's Hawaii. And yet if there's a quake and the power is out for 12-18 hours, as was the case October 15, 2007, the big crybabies here on Oahu were magnified much more than those true victims on the Big Island, many of whom probably have resumed life in homes that should be condemned or drastically repaired.

    We have hurricane clips on our house. That, the toilet paper, bottled water, and pull-top tomato soup cans, have got us about ready for anything. Thank goodness Costco sells batteries by the stick.
    Aloha from Lavagal

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

      Exactly wat Lavagal said above.

      We not ready foa NUTTIN!

      Shame.

      Auntie Lynn
      Be AKAMAI ~ KOKUA Hawai`i!
      Philippians 4:13 --- I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

        It's not just emergency supplies, but also what you, as an individual, should do when an earthquake hits. Here is a starting point for you.

        Miulang
        "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

          Here's something I shared on Wala'au.

          EXTRACT FROM DOUG COPP'S ARTICLE ON THE "TRIANGLE OF LIFE"

          "My name is Doug Copp. I am the Rescue Chief and Disaster Manager of the
          American Rescue Team International (ARTI), the world's most experienced
          rescue team. The information in this article will save lives in an earthquake.
          I have crawled inside 875 collapsed buildings, worked with rescue teams
          from 60 countries, founded rescue teams in several countries, and I am a
          member of many rescue teams from many countries. I was the United
          Nations expert in Disaster Mitigation for two years. I have worked at every
          Major disaster in the world since 1985, except for simultaneous disasters.
          In 1996 we made a film which proved my survival methodology to be
          correct. The Turkish Federal Government, City of Istanbul, University of
          Istanbul Case Productions and ARTI cooperated to film this practical, scientific
          test. We collapsed a school and a home with 20 mannequins inside. Ten
          mannequins did "duck and cover," and ten mannequins I used in my
          "triangle of life" survival method. After the simulated earthquake collapse we
          crawled through the rubble and entered the building to film and document
          the results. The film, in which I practiced my survival techniques under
          directly observable, scientific conditions, relevant to building collapse,
          showed there would have been zero percent survival for those doing duck
          and cover. There would likely have been 100 percent survivability for people
          using my method of the "triangle of life." This film has been seen by
          millions of viewers on television in Turkey and the rest of Europe, and
          it was seen in the USA, Canada and Latin America on the TV program Real TV.
          The first building I ever crawled inside of was a school in Mexico City
          during the 1985 earthquake. Every child was under their desk. Every
          child was crushed to the thickness of their bones. They could have survived by
          lying down next to their desks in the aisles. It was obscene, unnecessary
          and I wondered why the children were not in the aisles. I didn't at the
          time know that the children were told to hide under something.
          Simply stated, when buildings collapse, the weight of the ceilings
          falling upon the objects or furniture inside crushes these objects, leaving a
          space or void next to them. This space is what I call the "triangle of life".
          The larger the object, the stronger, and the less it will compact.
          The less the object compacts, the larger the void, the greater the
          probability that the person who is using this void for safety will not
          be injured. The next time you watch collapsed buildings on television,
          count the "triangles" you see formed. They are everywhere. It is the most
          common shape, you will see, in a collapsed building. They are everywhere.


          TEN TIPS FOR EARTHQUAKE SAFETY
          1) Most everyone who simply "ducks and covers" when buildings collapse are
          crushed to death. People who get under objects, like desks or cars, are crushed.

          2) Cats, dogs and babies often naturally curl up in the fetal position.
          You should too in an earthquake. It is a natural safety/survival instinct.
          You can survive in a smaller void. Get next to an object, next to a sofa,
          next to a large bulky object that will compress slightly but leave a void
          next to it.

          3) Wooden buildings are the safest type of construction to be in during
          An earthquake. Wood is flexible and moves with the force of the earthquake.
          If the wooden building does collapse, large survival voids are created.
          Also, the wooden building has less concentrated, crushing weight.
          Brick buildings will break into individual bricks. Bricks will cause many injuries
          but less squashed bodies than concrete slabs.

          4) If you are in bed during the night and an earthquake occurs, simply
          Roll off the bed. A safe void will exist around the bed. Hotels can achieve
          a much greater survival rate in earthquakes, simply by posting a sign on
          The back of the door of every room telling occupants to lie down on the
          floor, next to the bottom of the bed during an earthquake.

          5) If an earthquake happens and you cannot easily escape by getting out
          the door or window, then lie down and curl up in the fetal position next to
          a sofa, or large chair.

          6) Most everyone who gets under a doorway when buildings collapse is
          killed. How? If you stand under a doorway and the doorjamb falls forward
          or
          backward you will be crushed by the ceiling above. If the door jam falls
          sideways you will be cut in half by the doorway. In either case, you
          will be killed!

          7) Never go to the stairs. The stairs have a different "moment of
          frequency" (they swing separately from the main part of the building).
          The stairs and remainder of the building continuously bump into each other
          until structural failure of the stairs takes place. The people who get
          on stairs before they fail are chopped up by the stair treads - horribly
          mutilated. Even if the building doesn't collapse, stay away from the
          stairs. The stairs are a likely part of the building to be damaged. Even
          if the stairs are not collapsed by the earthquake, they may collapse later
          when overloaded by fleeing people. They should always be checked for
          safety, even when the rest of the building is not damaged.

          Cool Get Near the Outer Walls Of Buildings Or Outside Of Them If Possible
          -
          It is much better to be near the outside of the building rather than the
          interior. The farther inside you are from the outside perimeter of the
          building the greater the probability that your escape route will be
          blocked

          9) People inside of their vehicles are crushed when the road above falls
          in an earthquake and crushes their vehicles; which is exactly what happened
          with the slabs between the decks of the Nimitz Freeway. The victims of the
          San Francisco earthquake all stayed inside of their vehicles. They were all killed.
          They could have easily survived by getting out and sitting or lying next to their
          vehicles. Everyone killed would have survived if they had been able to get out
          of their cars and sit or lie next to them. All the crushed cars had voids 3 feet
          high next to them, except for the cars that had columns fall directly across them.

          10) I discovered, while crawling inside of collapsed newspaper offices
          and other offices with a lot of paper, that paper does not compact. Large
          voids are found surrounding stacks of paper. Spread the word to everyone
          YOU care about and save someone's life!"

          Auntie Lynn
          Be AKAMAI ~ KOKUA Hawai`i!
          Philippians 4:13 --- I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

            Originally posted by lavagal View Post
            And yet if there's a quake and the power is out for 12-18 hours, as was the case October 15, 2007, the big crybabies here on Oahu were magnified much more than those true victims on the Big Island, many of whom probably have resumed life in homes that should be condemned or drastically repaired.
            That was by far one of the most annoying aspect of that day, the Oahu-centric
            coverage. There was more things about the power outage on Oahu than the real damage that occurred on the Big Island.
            Check out my blog on Kona issues :
            The Kona Blog

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

              I could probably go back and edit my post to say October 15, 2006, but who knows, maybe we're destined to repeat, repeat, repeat, until we get it right.

              I'm intrigued by Miulang's and Aunty Lynn's posts. I will definitely go over them more thoroughly!

              Hey Konaguy. Hope all is well over there. Or getting better at least.
              Aloha from Lavagal

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

                Originally posted by lavagal View Post
                Hey Konaguy. Hope all is well over there. Or getting better at least.
                Well things are returning to normal here. Although my dad still hasn't fixed the crack in the drywall in our ceiling, or had our sink replaced, or my window fixed. But considering the worse damage suffered by others, we are really lucky.
                Check out my blog on Kona issues :
                The Kona Blog

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

                  guam has alotta earth quakes... big ones 2 ... i remember when i was like 7

                  there was this 7.5 earthquake , and it felt like Giants were playing see-saw with the earth.

                  and there was another one ... 8.5 but i was sleeping and didnt experience that one.. people say it was really scary though
                  Ebb And Flow

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                  • #10
                    Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

                    Originally posted by Miulang View Post
                    ...Hawai'i apparently also has some fairly significant earthquake activity. WA residents are taught from school age on what to do if they are caught in an earthquake. Are the citizens of Hawai'i also becoming more educated on what they need to do to protect themselves and their property?
                    Residents are repeatedly told to get 72 hour emergency kits. What is unique about an earthquake threat? Building collapse. But what is that risk here? What is the risk of a large quake? We may be seismically active, but that can mean you're less likely to have a big one.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

                      The DOE still recommends that children get UNDER their desks during an earthquake. I know because I had the conversation with the principal of my daughter's school.

                      She said she can't do it any different, even if it means the safety of our children. Our litigious society, driven by crybaby liberalism, has gotten to the point where we can't even protect our children by teaching what is right and safe.
                      FutureNewsNetwork.com
                      Energy answers are already here.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

                        Originally posted by timkona View Post
                        The DOE still recommends that children get UNDER their desks during an earthquake. I know because I had the conversation with the principal of my daughter's school.

                        She said she can't do it any different, even if it means the safety of our children. Our litigious society, driven by crybaby liberalism, has gotten to the point where we can't even protect our children by teaching what is right and safe.
                        This is only because the desks are more stable then the ceilings at most of the schools. Tiles, lights, etc.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

                          Originally posted by timkona View Post
                          The DOE still recommends that children get UNDER their desks during an earthquake. I know because I had the conversation with the principal of my daughter's school.

                          She said she can't do it any different, even if it means the safety of our children. Our litigious society, driven by crybaby liberalism, has gotten to the point where we can't even protect our children by teaching what is right and safe.
                          I'm wondering if that principal is getting confused with the nuclear "duck and cover" technique we all practiced as school children in the 60's...and don't look at the window or else you'll go blind from the flash.
                          Life is what you make of it...so please read the instructions carefully.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

                            Originally posted by GeckoGeek View Post
                            Residents are repeatedly told to get 72 hour emergency kits. What is unique about an earthquake threat? Building collapse. But what is that risk here? What is the risk of a large quake? We may be seismically active, but that can mean you're less likely to have a big one.
                            For one thing, unlike most other natural disasters, you don't get any advance warnings when an earthquake is about to hit, at least not far enough in advance to know it was coming to really do something about it (animals do start acting strange immediately before an earthquake hits, though).

                            Second, even though you can't predict when a really big earthquake will hit, there are things you can do proactively to ensure that people's lives and their property can be made more safe (checking to make sure your house is securely fastened to its foundation, knowing where the safest part of the house and your office are, etc.)

                            Third, the cost to repair things if you don't carry earthquake insurance could be very costly. But earthquake insurance in itself is costly (I have a $2,000 deductible policy on the contents of my condo and the building also carries earthquake insurance) and may not even be available in Hawai'i.

                            Fourth, unless your family has contingency plans in place (this could be the same one you would use in case of a tsunami), the confusion and disruption that a large earthquake can cause could be particularly traumatizing. I couldn't believe the number of "Lookie Lous" who just HAD to get in their cars and drive around immediately after the Oct. 15 quake. If the damage had been more severe (and if people had gotten injured), how could firetrucks, ambulances and the police have gotten to their destinations without some delay? Unless you're in danger physically, stay where you are right after an earthquake.

                            Miulang

                            P.S. Tim, it's not just a matter of crawling under the desk. Are the kids being taught to curl up into a ball under their desks (see Auntie Lynn's post about the "Triangle of Life"). And parents should talk to the school administrators about the structural conditions of the school's roof, etc. An earthquake might be over in 10 seconds or less, but a ceiling can still come down in that short period of time. I doubt anyone could safely evacuate a building in 10 seconds, especially if the ground is rolling.
                            "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

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                            • #15
                              Re: Hawai'i and severe earthquakes

                              In some instances you don't even know it's an earthquake so you stand there kinda numb until you make that realization that the ground isn't so stable anymore...time lost: maybe 3 or 4 seconds.

                              In a high rise I doubt anyone would have much chance of surviving if the building collapses so there's your collateral loss right there.

                              In a car while driving you'd think your tire became unbalanced or something before the roadway rips open in front of you swallowing your car. If it's the second tier overpass of a freeway and your car is plummeting headfirst into the asphalt some 60-feet below, well even the airbag won't save your life.

                              What can you do to be prepared? Not much if you're not at the right place at the right time...other than not to panic as most usually do. That's about all you can do in those immediate seconds. Then you plan or exercise your egress.
                              Life is what you make of it...so please read the instructions carefully.

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