View Poll Results: Which conventional "old school" media and equipment do you still use?

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  • LP or 45rpm Vinyl Record

    8 34.78%
  • Audio Cassette

    10 43.48%
  • 8-Track Tape

    0 0%
  • Reel-to-Reel Audio

    3 13.04%
  • VHS/Beta Max Video Cassette

    17 73.91%
  • Standard8/Super8 Film (motion) Movie Camera

    1 4.35%
  • 35mm Film (still) Camera

    7 30.43%
  • Other

    6 26.09%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

  1. #26
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by Honoruru View Post
    And I still have a Canon AE-1 with a bunch of lenses, though I haven't used it since 2000, when I bought a digital camera (Nikon Coolpix 990). The AE-1 still has some undeveloped film in it.
    I found a roll of undeveloped film a couple of years back that had to be 10 years old. The pictures came out but they all had a red tint to them - actually, they looked pretty cool.

  2. #27
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoGeek View Post
    I'd get it developed. Film doesn't keep forever. It might already be gone.
    That's why I won't develop it. It's probably gone (and there wasn't anything important on it). To make matters worse, it was slide film, Kodachrome.

    Since this thread is about digital/"now-presumed-obsolete" mediums, what about slide films? What about Kodachrome? I've tried scanning old Kodachrome slides, but get terrible results. Other types of slides come out okay, but Kodachrome is a nightmare.

  3. #28
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by mel View Post
    TV's with tuning knobs are old, especially separate ones with 2 - 13 for VHF and 14 - 83 for UHF.... the latter being really old if it goes up to 83 as 70 to 83 was taken away from TV years ago. Newer sets had UHF channels 14 to 69.

    Yep, just checked mine. Second knob goes up to 83! No wonder I never get anything but static. Good enough for me though, I don't watch much tv anyway.

    I loved using the Holgas, and they're really cheap, I don't know why I don't just buy one. And a roll of electrical tape, can't forget that.

    Walking home from work today I saw a guy with an old 4x5 camera set up on the sidewalk. 4x5s are fun but they take so much work. Loading each sheet individually, focusing and hoping your image stays in focus while you add the film, then developing each individually.. what a pain. But nice results.

    On the subject of slide film, we had to shoot with slide film for my color photography class last semester. I botched the first roll so had to do it twice, but they turned out pretty cool. I need to scan them when I get back to school. I've never used kodachrome, so I can't help you there.

    And speaking of cameras, what about Polaroids? We used to have one a few years ago but I think it got lost somewhere in storage. At school we did a project with polaroid transfers that I would love to try again.

    I really can ramble about cameras, sorry..

  4. #29
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Yep, 14 - 83 is old school UHF. Back in the mid and late 1980s, when cell phones were mostly analog, you could pick up random cell phone conversations by tuning into some of the higher channels on the UHF dial of your TV. That was kind of strange fun back in the day.

    I ditto your opinion on Holga. I should just simply buy one. The non-flash model is $20. Depending on what you want to do with the camera, not using black tape around it may "add" to the photos with the light streaks intact.

    A friend of mine had 2 view cameras. I don't ever recall him using it. Second to that is the Mamiya RB67, which is a giant size 120 roll film camera. I used that a few times to take group shots of people at our school. The big negative cameras allow you to make collosal size photos if you have the paper and room to do it!

    I used to do a lot of black and white film and print processing more than 20 years ago. Kind of miss it sometimes. Was fun, but very time consuming.

    Dabbled a little in processing Ektachrome slide film years ago. The temp controls had to be very accurate or your film would be ruined.
    I'm still here. Are you?

  5. #30
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Oh yes C-6 processing for Kodak slide film and I do believe C-6 will develop Kodachrome 64.

    Back then for the best slide film you had to use Kodachrome. Wedding photographers loved the stuff because you could set up a changing bag to transfer the roll of film into a film cannister and process right on the spot. The whole process took less than 20-minutes.

    Then you cut the finished film into individual slides and put em in the bank of projectors just in time for the wedding reception.

  6. #31
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by mel View Post
    Dabbled a little in processing Ektachrome slide film years ago. The temp controls had to be very accurate or your film would be ruined.
    Processing temperature had to be +/- 1-degree F. or else you would have color shift so a bucket of ice and a tray of warm water was always necessary in C-6 processing.

  7. #32
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by mel View Post
    Yep, 14 - 83 is old school UHF. Back in the mid and late 1980s, when cell phones were mostly analog, you could pick up random cell phone conversations by tuning into some of the higher channels on the UHF dial of your TV. That was kind of strange fun back in the day.
    I can remember when I was younger, we used to be able to get people's phone conversations through the speakers of our computer. That was always bizarre, especially when you're sitting at the computer and you start to hear voices..

    I ditto your opinion on Holga. I should just simply buy one. The non-flash model is $20. Depending on what you want to do with the camera, not using black tape around it may "add" to the photos with the light streaks intact.
    No matter how much tape I wrapped around my holga, I always had light leaks. It did 'add' to the photo though, you're right. Ah, I've been meaning to add some of my holga photos up in my online store, maybe I'll do that this evening.


    A friend of mine had 2 view cameras. I don't ever recall him using it. Second to that is the Mamiya RB67, which is a giant size 120 roll film camera. I used that a few times to take group shots of people at our school. The big negative cameras allow you to make collosal size photos if you have the paper and room to do it!
    Oh we have two Mamiyas at school -- one is the twin lens reflex and one an SLR. We had six of the medium format cameras altogether, which was wonderful because there were only four students in the photo class! The medium format cameras are trippy though, because you're looking through the viewfinder and everything is reversed. It can take a minute to orient yourself. Especially when you're looking through the view while walking!

    And yes, with the large format cameras we ended up printing on 16x20 paper, but one student in my class chose to print 20x24. Really nice looking.

    Printing black and white may be time consuming (and can be expensive) but I've always enjoyed it. It's relaxing, when I don't have five prints due by the following morning.

  8. #33
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by sophielynette View Post
    Printing black and white may be time consuming (and can be expensive) but I've always enjoyed it. It's relaxing, when I don't have five prints due by the following morning.
    Printing black and white was a passion of mine decades ago. I would come out of the darkroom smelling like Dektol. Everytime I have to go get an X-ray done the familiar smell of that developer wafts thru the air and brings back memories of dodging and burning

  9. #34
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Yep, long ago I did the whole black and white film developing & print processing. If I remember correctly film developing was with D76 and the print developing was with Dektol, and then fixer, and then stop bath and a wash. I still have several of the photos I made in a box or on albums. Even scanned a few of them so that I have .jpgs to display on my computer and in my iPod.

    One thing about doing stuff in the darkroom was that I seemed to loose track of time. I'd go in the afternoon and when I came out it was like 9 or 10 at night!
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  10. #35

    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by mel View Post
    If I remember correctly film developing was with D76 and the print developing was with Dektol, and then fixer, and then stop bath and a wash.
    I think you need to flip the stop bath and fixer steps. Then be sure to add one of those lovely heated print dryers at the end.

    I will never forget the scent of stop bath, permanently burned into my sinuses. I spent far too many years in the darkroom in high-school and college (I designed and supplied the first darkroom at the community college I attended.)

    I also put a sign on the door that said: "Do not open the door, or you will let out all the dark."

  11. #36
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Lakio View Post
    I also put a sign on the door that said: "Do not open the door, or you will let out all the dark."

    I love it! The darkrooms at my school don't have doors, but rather something of a labyrinth of walls that zigzag back and forth, and black curtains right at the entrance to the darkroom. Of course, it was always a bit jarring when you go to walk through the curtain and you slam into someone coming through the other side.

    Darkroom and glass blowing are the main reason I've never owned nice clothing until just recently. What was the point when everything was going to get sweaty and stained? When I started out I used to wear an apron and rubber gloves but it just got to be such a pain. My teacher still yells at us for grabbing prints out of the chemicals with our fingers instead of tongs.. but those dumb tongs are so frustrating..

    I actually lost a set of those earbud headphones to darkroom chemicals. The bud fell out of my ear and into the stop bath tray. Of course, I hadn't realized it until after I'd replaced the earbud in my ear. Yuck! Chemicals in the ear, not pleasant. The earbud itself actually fell to pieces, which is a bit disturbing.

  12. #37

    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    You guys ever put pennies in the fixer to silver plate them?

    The dark room was kinda fun, but major time consumer.

  13. #38
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    No but I wish I knew about that back then, that would have been cool.

  14. #39

    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoGeek View Post
    You guys ever put pennies in the fixer to silver plate them?
    Quote Originally Posted by craigwatanabe View Post
    No but I wish I knew about that back then, that would have been cool.
    That only worked if you had fixer that had been used so much that it had built up enough silver in the effluent; by that point, the fixer was no longer any good for photographic use as it was too saturated, so we had usually dumped it by that point. I never got to try it.

  15. #40

    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Lakio View Post
    That only worked if you had fixer that had been used so much that it had built up enough silver in the effluent;
    True. Can't do that with fresh fixer.


    [/QUOTE]by that point, the fixer was no longer any good for photographic use as it was too saturated, so we had usually dumped it by that point. I never got to try it.[/QUOTE]

    So, how do you tell when the fixer is shot? I can't remember. I went to public high school. The fixer probably was a bit "used". Still, I think it may be a bit of exaggeration to say it's no good if it can silver a penny.

  16. #41
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    We always had a little bottle of something or other that you dropped into the fixer -- if it turned milky white, it was no good.

    I always just got into the habit of mixing a new batch of chemicals anytime I went in to print. Who knew how long that stuff had been left there?

  17. #42
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    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    I think if the stuff turned like really black, it meant that it was old and had to be replaced.
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  18. #43

    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoGeek View Post
    So, how do you tell when the fixer is shot? I can't remember. I went to public high school. The fixer probably was a bit "used". Still, I think it may be a bit of exaggeration to say it's no good if it can silver a penny.
    Quote Originally Posted by sophielynette View Post
    We always had a little bottle of something or other that you dropped into the fixer -- if it turned milky white, it was no good.
    That's what we used, too (Hypo-Check, if I remember right.) A good rule of thumb in those days was that you could expect a batch of fixer to be good for about 40 prints.

  19. #44

    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Lakio View Post
    That's what we used, too (Hypo-Check, if I remember right.) A good rule of thumb in those days was that you could expect a batch of fixer to be good for about 40 prints.
    I suspect they just made a batch every so often - once a day or twice a day or something like that.

  20. #45

    Default Re: LPs, VHS & 35mm Film

    A few hundred 3/4 inch tapes plus 2 or 3 u-matic decks

    A few thousand Beta tapes and 4 decks

    Several thousand VHS tapes and maybe 3 machines

    Still have tons of audio cassettes, 45's, LP's, etc.

    If anyone wants to dump their old 3/4 inch tapes, beta or VHS from the 70's or 1980's with off-air tapings let me know.

    Aj

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