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Thread: Japanese term for cooking

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Default Japanese term for cooking

    hey guys. i was trying to google this but couldn't come up with a way to do it, so i thought i'd ask here, if you don't mind.

    what is the japanese term for cooking when they don't clean their cookware? they do it for their roux or maybe i've heard for their curry. my dad used to do it...he had a couple of pans that he lightly washed but never thoroughly cleaned.

    thx

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Default Re: Japanese term for cooking

    I remember the term kogi or cogi being said when dealing with pots that was cooking rice over an open fire (as in camping). But to be honest I never asked about the origin of the term or the way it was spelled or if it dealt with stuff inside or outside the pot.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Japanese term for cooking

    I know my Japanese mom had a few pans she treated this way, kind of a long time ago. But then, I think a lot of cooks don't wash their cast-iron stuff. Just toss some rock salt in there, swoosh it around with a paper towel, and dump it all. I don't think it's just a Japanese thing.
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Japanese term for cooking

    Quote Originally Posted by helen View Post
    I remember the term kogi or cogi being said when dealing with pots that was cooking rice over an open fire (as in camping). But to be honest I never asked about the origin of the term or the way it was spelled or if it dealt with stuff inside or outside the pot.
    "Koge" generally refers to something being burnt or over-cooked (such as kogepan, or "burnt bread"); many people like certain foods to have this character, such as the rice that gets a little brown from being at the bottom of the cooking vessel.

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