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Thread: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

  1. #1
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    Default Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    The more I think about it the more I can't deny that , really I just wanna live in Hawaii. I've read through almost all the posts about this subject and have done alot of research online. Now I just want some opinions on some specific things. Here's my situation. I have a successful online business and I would not need to find a job. I really want to live somewhere rual that is nowhere near the 'tourist traps'. My business is beadmaking and beaded jewelry. I wouldn't mind selling some of my stuff at a local market if that would be possible.
    So give me some opinions on living on Molokai. I realize this place may be the most rual island in Hawaii, but I think it sounds wonderful. I grew up in only the most rual parts of Missouri. I am kinda used to it. When I was a kid my family lived off the land and we had to drive 45 mins to get groceries. I am not all that worried about it being too rual. I do wish I knew more about the actual experience of living there. The houses seem to be a little cheaper there in comparison to other islands. Why is that? Does any one know which part of the island is best?
    Just give me all the opinions you can... I know you all got em . Just be nice.
    Thank you all very much,
    Susie

  2. #2

    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    One problem you have to take into account, Susie, is that many of the current residents of Moloka`i are having a hard time economically at present, and may not be particularly ... shall we say, "open-hearted" ... about another family coming in from the Mainland to live off "their" land.

    Costs of living in Hawai`i are exorbitantly high, especially if you're coming from the Midwest. Your online business will need to be VERY successful. And will your husband be able to find work on Moloka`i?

    This would not be an easy move to make - not impossible, of course, but one that demands a lot of research and preparation. Your whole family will experience culture shock, and a more distinct variety in country Moloka`i.

    At this point, I'd suggest you start planning to make some trips. Plan to visit Hawai`i a few times, including several jaunts to Moloka`i. Spend enough time to get beyond the veil of "paradise." Learn about life, language, culture, food, costs, pace, people, history. If you move, you need first to erase as much of the ignorance that us non-locals all carry.

    And you need an "escape plan" - enough money and a safety net to catch you if it just doesn't work out and you have to leave the Islands. It would be one thing if you were unfettered, but you have your keiki to take care of.

    Read ALL the threads here about people wanting to move to Hawai`i, and you'll see some fantastic advice - and even a success story or two. Eyes wide open, dear - that's the only way you can make it work.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Hi Susie,

    I notice that those on this board who are most familiar with Molokai are decidedly silent on this thread.......... which says something in of itself..... (Random - where are you?)

    Let me start with the fact that I LOVE Molokai and many of the people who live there. Many good memories there and hopefully more to come. That being said, Leo makes some good points. If you are serious about this, then I would recommend at least a week's stay at the Hotel Molokai (not at a condo). Make sure you take the ferry from Maui to Molokai. Your other option is to fly, but if you are considering moving there, take the ferry. Hang out with the locals on Friday night (excellent times!). Get to know the people who work there. Then drive around and visit with whoever you can.

    Friends of ours relocated to Molokai a few years ago. And that was from Maui. It was (and still is) a tough nut to crack. They are still considered outsiders. He has to travel to Maui for work every day. That is a ferry ride each way with 10 ft swells on a good day. She is a teacher there. Education is another issue on Molokai. Unfortunately, it is not a priority. You avatar shows you with a small child? How will he be treated by the other children?

    You say you are from Iowa or Missouri. Either one is a place I have absolutely no idea about other than it is land-locked in the middle of the country. All I picture is flat corn fields and Dorothy (sorry Leo and whoever else is from there - chalk it up to cultural ignorance ). I grew up on what amounts to a sand bar stuck out in the Atlantic ocean, where living off tourism and fishing is a way of life and visiting/living on & off for 20 yrs on Maui. I could not live on Molokai - as much as I love visiting there. You mention you had to drive 45 minutes to get groceries. How are your sea legs? There are no supermarkets on the island. And don't expect any to come too soon. That too, is a ferry ride away.

    It's been a couple of years since I was there, but they used to have a bumper sticker on Molokai that says something like "Molokai - a wonderful place to visit - just don't stay" or something to that effect. Although the company that ran the Molokai Ranch have pulled out now (or could you say - pushed out?), they were trying to build ocean front McMansions on La'au Point. The last time we were there, all the for sale signs had buckshot through them. Of course, that is sacred land, but the point is, the locals- for many reasons - are not inclined to welcome strangers wanting to move there.

    I wish you all the best in your quest. But I highly recommend that you visit the different islands - each has its own unique character (kind of like the difference between Iowa and Missouri? I'm just guessing.....) - before you make the move. Good luck!

    Jill

  4. #4

    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by acousticlady View Post
    How are your sea legs? There are no supermarkets on the island. And don't expect any to come too soon. That too, is a ferry ride away.
    Is this the ferry they use?

    Do people pay 50 dollars each way just to go to the supermarket?

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by Vanguard View Post
    Is this the ferry they use?

    Do people pay 50 dollars each way just to go to the supermarket?
    Yes, that is the ferry. Locals get a discount. I believe that if you work on Maui the employers pay for it or they only have to pay $10 or so. Even at that, it is still a huge cost. But that is one reason, that a trip to the supermarket is a once a week or once a month event. Many bring on board big coolers to hold their groceries because there is only one trip in the morning and one trip in the late afternoon.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    I would like to thank you all for posting. All kinds of advice and opinions are appreciated.
    I would like to clarify a few things about my situation that I may not have been clear about.

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Lakio View Post
    many of the current residents of Moloka`i are having a hard time economically at present, and may not be particularly ... shall we say, "open-hearted" ... about another family coming in from the Mainland to live off "their" land.
    I never said I was going to live off the land on Molokai. What I said was that I've lived in rual areas before and when I was a kid my family lived off the land in Missouri. Although i wouldn't mind having a small vegetable garden, though.


    Quote Originally Posted by acousticlady View Post
    You mention you had to drive 45 minutes to get groceries. How are your sea legs? There are no supermarkets on the island. And don't expect any to come too soon. That too, is a ferry ride away.
    Acording to visitmolokai.com there are nine grocery stores and a farmer's market on the island, and that includes a natural foods store, too. I realize these are not supermarkets, but in rual areas, I don't expect supermarkets. I really have a hard time believing that all 7000 Molokai residents take the ferry to Maui every week to get their groceries. Maybe some do, but I've lived in places where there are no supermarkets nearby. I think its great that all the grocers are independent business owners. Gives them character.

    I really would like to hear from someone who actually lives on the island. What I need is some expiriential advice. I've already done so much research. I have read almost every thread and post on moving to Hawaii on this site and some on other sites. They always say the same stuff. Its all very good advice. Well noted.
    I love hearing opinions, too. Even the negative ones are interesting. Keep them coming, especially if you live on Molokai.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by acousticlady View Post
    I believe that if you work on Maui the employers pay for it or they only have to pay $10 or so. Even at that, it is still a huge cost.
    A one hour trip to New York City on a suburban commuter rail costs about that much or more each way (twice as much if you live 2 or more hours away from the City). But I can imagine it is still quite difficult. If anyone has information about this type of fare or a monthly pass, please share, I am curious as to how exactly this works.
    Last edited by Vanguard; July 9th, 2009 at 07:03 AM.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by susie View Post
    The more I think about it the more I can't deny that , really I just wanna live in Hawaii. I've read through almost all the posts about this subject and have done alot of research online. Now I just want some opinions on some specific things. Here's my situation. I have a successful online business and I would not need to find a job. I really want to live somewhere rual that is nowhere near the 'tourist traps'. My business is beadmaking and beaded jewelry. I wouldn't mind selling some of my stuff at a local market if that would be possible.
    So give me some opinions on living on Molokai.
    Am I reading your post correctly? You've never even set foot on Molokai? It's astounding that you could form an opinion without any actual experience. It's difficult to see how the reality could ever live up to your current expectations.

    Try turning your question around for a different perspective. When you were living in the most rural parts of Missouri, how would your community have reacted to a new family who moved in from Hawaii with no idea of the local culture, expecting to earn an online living and perhaps sell jewelry at the weekend flea market? How long would it take such a family to adapt and to eventually (if ever) be welcomed as locals by the rest of the community? I grew up in a small town near Pittsburgh and I saw the scenario play out over & over.

    This board hears from a lot of people who are enamored of island life but who haven't lived it-- so they're enjoying a fantasy totally disconnected from the reality. Many show up with high hopes and unbounded enthusiasm but lack a long-term plan for living the rest of the decade here, let alone the rest of their lives. Locals are skeptical that newcomers will last for more than a year or two, and it's difficult to invest time & effort getting to know the "new guys" when they may only be short-term round-trippers. Unless you were born & raised on Molokai, it's hard for the residents to imagine why someone like you would want to live on "their" island. Invade "their" space. Put another car on "their" road. Crowd another kid into "their" schools. Use "their" beaches and surf "their" waves.

    You have a lot of visiting ahead of you and a lot of thinking/discussing with the rest of your family whether they'd see Molokai as such a wonderful place as you do.
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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    You are right Nords. I do need to visit.

    As far as reversing the question... The town I lived in in rual missouri could not possibly be compared to rual Hawaii. There were around 150 people there. There are no beaches there. The climate is harsh most times of the year. There is very little natural beauty aside from a few muddy creeks and rivers. Most people I knew back then don't even live there anymore. If a Hawaiian family moved there, we probably would have been astounded on why they would have wanted to come here of all places from Hawaii of all places. But, nonetheless, I don't think most folks would've been unkind to them.

    What I hear you telling me is that the locals will hate us for coming, and we will not be socially excepted, and that I probably won't make it because of this. If its so bad, why do you all love it so much? Why is it so unbelievable that I would love it too, in my own way?
    Are all 7000 people on Molokai people who were born and raised there? Is it impossible to transplant there and be happy? I know I wasn't lucky enough to be born and raised in Hawaii, but does that mean I can't be happy if I move there?

    I know that there is a stereotype about newcomers. There have been a lot of suggesting that I will come and not know what I have gotten myself into and be miserable.
    This is why I'm talking to you all. So I can get some questions answered and know all that I can so I would know what I am getting myself into. Please don't post suggesting that I am completely starry eyed and ignorant. I may have a few stars in my eyes, but I'm not irrational.
    And I do want to come to visit. It will just take some time.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Many have come before you and asked the same questions and den some.

    Read the archives.

    Mahalo,

    1stwahine
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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    I HAVE read the archives. and then some. I want experiential advice and opinions.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by susie View Post
    I HAVE read the archives. and then some. I want experiential advice and opinions.
    How much you willing to pay?

    HAHAHAHAHAHAH

    Juss joking.

    But...den again...some people have the time to answer and some people don't. If can~can. If no can~ no can.

    Be humble...no get mad.

    Hope you get wat you looking foa.

    1stwahine
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    Red face Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    I think a first step would be to visit. More than once. Sure, there's a lot of researching that can be done online, and you're doing that well, including here on HT. But as hinted above, there's probably a good reason there's a dearth of responses from people on Molokai, and only part of it is because connectivity and thus representation in online communities is limited.

    Each island has its own personality. And some islands, from Kauai to Lanai and Molokai, are more protective and inherently (and often rightfully) skeptical of outsiders. Now, I personally feel that Kauai's reputation in this regard is partially manufactured, fanned in part by Mainland transplants who just want to keep their "paradise" from others seeking the same dream. But as far as Molokai is concerned? It's earnestly about the most genuinely Hawaiian community you'll find. And that's something to be admired, respected, and carefully weighed. Even I, born and raised in Hawaii and part Hawaiian, adopt a very different and measured mindset when visiting Molokai.

    So... why Molokai? Why choose the most drastic option when it comes to relocating to Hawaii?

    Generally, when anyone says they want to move to Hawaii -- specifically that they want to get away from it all, get away from the hustle and bustle of Western life, stay away from tourist traps, yada yada yada -- I still tell them to start on Oahu. (As to well as come with housing and employment arranged in advance, as well as about $10,000 in savings and return tickets just in case.)

    You can still go "rural" on Oahu, you can still get away from it all and shop at farmers markets or grow your own food and hang out with artists and sell crafts. You can pretend you're living on Molokai or the Big Island or Kauai, in a different time and place, and feed whatever desire for escapism that strikes...

    But when push comes to shove, you also have ample employment options (well, comparatively, though the job market is tough everywhere), you have infrastructure, you have public transportation, you have quality health care, and yes, you have access to the "trappings" of modern life like shopping and events and attractions and entertainment if you ultimately want them.

    Saying you want to move straight to Molokai from anywhere, having never visited Hawaii at all, is like saying you want to climb Mt. Everest having only read books about it. You should at least take a few vacation trips to Nepal -- taking it slow, getting a read from the front-lines, rather than virtually -- before investing in hiking boots.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    1stwahine,
    I am so sorry I sounded harsh to you. You seem like a very nice lady and I never meant snap at you like that.
    I must say I was getting a bit frustrated/disappointed in the kinds of responces I was getting.

    Pzarquon,
    What are some of the more rual areas on Oahu that you recomend that I check out?
    and btw, the reason I have such an interest in Molokai is the fact that it is the most genuinely Hawaiian community that can be found. I find hawaiian culture so fascenating. From what I hear it is slow paced and simple. I am so drawn to that. I am open to other islands. I'm just trying to gather some info. Thanks so much for responding.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by pzarquon View Post
    I think a first step would be to visit. More than once. Sure, there's a lot of researching that can be done online, and you're doing that well, including here on HT. But as hinted above, there's probably a good reason there's a dearth of responses from people on Molokai, and only part of it is because connectivity and thus representation in online communities is limited.

    Each island has its own personality. And some islands, from Kauai to Lanai and Molokai, are more protective and inherently (and often rightfully) skeptical of outsiders. Now, I personally feel that Kauai's reputation in this regard is partially manufactured, fanned in part by Mainland transplants who just want to keep their "paradise" from others seeking the same dream. But as far as Molokai is concerned? It's earnestly about the most genuinely Hawaiian community you'll find. And that's something to be admired, respected, and carefully weighed. Even I, born and raised in Hawaii and part Hawaiian, adopt a very different and measured mindset when visiting Molokai.

    So... why Molokai? Why choose the most drastic option when it comes to relocating to Hawaii?

    Generally, when anyone says they want to move to Hawaii -- specifically that they want to get away from it all, get away from the hustle and bustle of Western life, stay away from tourist traps, yada yada yada -- I still tell them to start on Oahu. (As to well as come with housing and employment arranged in advance, as well as about $10,000 in savings and return tickets just in case.)

    You can still go "rural" on Oahu, you can still get away from it all and shop at farmers markets or grow your own food and hang out with artists and sell crafts. You can pretend you're living on Molokai or the Big Island or Kauai, in a different time and place, and feed whatever desire for escapism that strikes...

    But when push comes to shove, you also have ample employment options (well, comparatively, though the job market is tough everywhere), you have infrastructure, you have public transportation, you have quality health care, and yes, you have access to the "trappings" of modern life like shopping and events and attractions and entertainment if you ultimately want them.

    Saying you want to move straight to Molokai from anywhere, having never visited Hawaii at all, is like saying you want to climb Mt. Everest having only read books about it. You should at least take a few vacation trips to Nepal -- taking it slow, getting a read from the front-lines, rather than virtually -- before investing in hiking boots.

    that is pretty much what I came here to say. This is very sage advise, I would take it to heart.
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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by susie View Post
    1stwahine,
    I am so sorry I sounded harsh to you. You seem like a very nice lady and I never meant snap at you like that.
    I must say I was getting a bit frustrated/disappointed in the kinds of responces I was getting.
    No need to apologize. We ohana ova hea at HT.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    I haven't lived there but I did go there every year for work, so I do know the people both who worked there and those who didin't.

    The island is basically divided in three sections: The North end of Kalaupapa Home of Father Damien and the leprosy colony he ministered to, The West end where there is mostly Hawaiian Homestead land sparsely populated by the last of the rural Hawaiians who don't like outsiders, and the East end where it is mostly populated by those who are considered the outsiders that made the move anyway.

    Kaunakakai which is the main town in Molokai sits at what I call the Mason-Dixon line of Molokai, where east meets west. It's their commerce area where both sides of the island must meed in a cordial way in order to mutually survive on this island. There is a general market there if you can call it that. Produce that isn't farmed there is brought in by ferry from Maui. Meats are brought in the same way.

    Because of that Meats, Produce and Dairy products aren't always fresh. That's why most of the West-enders hunt for most of their food and rely on freezing their supply of Goat, Pig, and Deer meat. Fish is abundant there but you got to know someone to find the good fishing spots.

    When you go visit someone on Molokai, one of the best gifts you can get them is a cooler of fresh food. The West end has no markets so food has to be literally transported in from Kaunakakai, if you can find food to buy. The store shelves empty out as fast as they are filled.

    Unlike the mainland, going shopping is more than a drive away, it's a ferry ride to Maui then you can buy your goods. Molokai is very limited in what they offer in both perishable and non-perishable items. They have the true mom and pop sundries stores there with a very dusty small town (Kaunakakai) to facilitate it.

    On the East side, it's a bit more modern but mostly it's a mix of wealthy caucasians who made Molokai their island resort, and quite a few eccentric people and activists. Not the Molokai most of us would like to see it become.

    I live on the Big Island where it's size allows a really great way to live off the grid simply because water service, phone service, electrical service are not available in some of our rural communities. Sometimes during heavy rains, the gravel roads that service some of these remote communities are washed out or flooded. That's rural. Many farmers markets here so getting fresh produce is not a problem. The nice thing about the Big Island is, like the mainland if you need to do a major shopping errand, there is Target, Best Buy, Costco, Walmart, K-mart, Home Depot, Lowes, Sports Authority and a host of other big box retailers to satisfy your retail needs.

    Plus there are your smaller retailers such as Longs Drugs, Payless Shoes, and other smaller national chains here as well as fast food outlets such as McDonalds, Ruby Tuesdays and others.

    The size of the Island means an hour's drive from rural remote to urban sprawl with two huge mountains (Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa) that keeps the country country! You can get an extreme rural sense out here on the Big Island where chasing pigs out of your property is a daily chore.

    Molokai is pretty much for the residents of Molokai and typically a great place for visitors to come to to unwind, however you don't want to live there unless you know someone there already unless you want to be labelled an outsider despite living there for many years.

    A perfect motto for Molokai? Welcome to Molokai...when does your plane leave? That tells it all in a nutshell. Big Island however welcomes all.
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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    I lived on the West End of Moloka'i for 3 months years ago in a training program. Not very scenic on the West End. Much has changed since then and I have nothing of value to report on the conditions today. Times were much simpler then, no ferry to Maui. The grocery store was a 10x20 wooden shack. The movie theater in Kaunakakai was open air sitting on wooden benches. The restaurant was Dairy Queen where we could buy Saimin soup. Yes we did meet the Cockeyed Mayor while there. We went camping on the East End, nobody out there. I dunno, maybe not much has changed since then.

    I would just recommend that you rent on Moloka'i for a year before you sell the farm in Iowa. You would have to be a very hardy soul to make a simple life on Moloka'i.
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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by matapule View Post
    I lived on the West End of Moloka'i for 3 months years ago in a training program. Not very scenic on the West End. Much has changed since then and I have nothing of value to report on the conditions today. Times were much simpler then, no ferry to Maui. The grocery store was a 10x20 wooden shack. The movie theater in Kaunakakai was open air sitting on wooden benches. The restaurant was Dairy Queen where we could buy Saimin soup. Yes we did meet the Cockeyed Mayor while there. We went camping on the East End, nobody out there. I dunno, maybe not much has changed since then.

    I would just recommend that you rent on Moloka'i for a year before you sell the farm in Iowa. You would have to be a very hardy soul to make a simple life on Moloka'i.
    Molokai hasn't change by very much. I've lived in rural America in Mountain Home Idaho years before WalMart moved in and can vouch that Molokai is rural to the point where they can make a movie about it and it's people.

    If you're visiting and keep that status, locals there are really friendly. They always wave at you and will go out of their way to show you the island and introduce you to their family, and in Molokai everybody seems to be family. At least on the west end where the homesteaders are. But once you tell them, "wow I love this place so much I want to live here" suddenly you're outcast and off you go to the east side.
    Life is what you make of it...so please read the instructions carefully.

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    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Doesn't Molokai also have a problem with the lack of medical and dental services?

  21. #21

    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by susie View Post
    All kinds of advice and opinions are appreciated...I love hearing opinions, too. Even the negative ones are interesting.
    Quote Originally Posted by susie View Post
    Just give me all the opinions you can...
    Quote Originally Posted by susie View Post
    Please don't post suggesting that I am completely starry eyed and ignorant.
    Quote Originally Posted by susie View Post
    I must say I was getting a bit frustrated/disappointed in the kinds of responces I was getting.
    So...do you want honest responses, or just ones that tell you what you'd like to hear?

    Susie, I think the key thing that's coming through from folks here is that nothing compares to an actual visit - no amount of internet research, book reading, googling or movie watching.

    It sounds like you've already been doing quite a bit of research, so you've made a great start. Asking questions (like you are doing here) will also help you out - but you can't just reject the responses that disappoint you.

    In your first post in another thread, you said you recognized how expensive it is to visit Hawai`i, and that's a big reason why you've not yet done so (though I have no doubt you will). As expensive as it is to visit, it's even more so to move there and to live there as a resident.

    Let the negative aspects come at you; take them in, realize that they are not meant to scare you off, but to strengthen you for what you will experience. If you can work your way through all the hardest and harshest aspects of considering such a move, you stand a better chance of succeeding if you finally follow through on your goal.

    Oh...and regarding "Pidgin To Da Max"? When you do visit Hawai`i, don't, under ANY circumstances, try to speak pidgin based on what you've learned from that book. It'll help you to understand some of what the locals are saying - but trying to speak it when you didn't grow up with it will make you enemies faster than almost anything else!)

  22. #22

    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    What's your website?

    Another thing you might want to investigate is how reliable the 'net connections are out there so you can maintain your site efficiently, and to check out if there's any issues with shipping and receiving goods. You are going to need to be able to get your products out and your supplies in.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by acousticlady View Post
    You say you are from Iowa or Missouri. Either one is a place I have absolutely no idea about other than it is land-locked in the middle of the country. All I picture is flat corn fields and Dorothy (sorry Leo and whoever else is from there - chalk it up to cultural ignorance ).
    That's funny, AL!

    As I mentioned earlier, those of us who didn't grow up in Hawai`i have heads full of misconceptions about that "paradise" state. It's hard to accept that we've been fed a lot of it, cleaned up and Disney-fied, from the State's own visitor's bureau - and that Hawai`i is a very different place than what we thought. Takes a lot of work to shake those off - but it's the people of Hawai`i (those still there and those who moved away) who help us to get the truth into our heads.

    And cultural ignorance runs both ways. A lot of people think the same things you do about Midwestern states - no offense taken by me. Yep, many parts of Iowa are largely flat (though "gently rolling hills" can be found in much of the state - think of Grant Wood's famous paintings with the round trees); LOTS of corn fields, and soybeans, and pig farms, and cattle; but Dorothy is from Kansas (which, along with Nebraska, is mighty flat). As is the case everywhere, there is much beauty to be found, in both the landscape AND the people.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Wah-key'-key
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    10,390

    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    Quote Originally Posted by susie View Post
    [...]I really want to live somewhere rual[...]
    You're getting really good, honest advice here so I won't offer more of the same. I do have a curiosity question, however. I've noticed your use of the word "rual" throughout your posts and am curious if that word is used in place of "rural" in the midwest. I'd never seen the use of "rual" before. Again, just curious...

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Basse-Pointe, Martinique
    Posts
    696

    Default Re: Thinking about making the move to Molokai

    What Hawaii represents to so many...an island paradise...so does Iowa to we of the agricultural bent. I've been to Iowa numerous times, and I have to say the land there has to be some of most fertile and arable land I ever seen on Earth. Not at all a bad place to be, winters notwithstanding, if you're an old farmboy like me.

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