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  1. #1
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    Thumbs up Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Various people from or sailing to Hawaii are out there.
    If you hear of a story, please share it here!
    A start... http://www.midweek.com/content/colum..._a_pro_sailor/
    Life is either an adventure... or you're not doing it right!!!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Sailing... Hawaii connection?!

    July 5 is the start of the Pacific Cup race from San Francisco to Kaneohe Bay. http://pacificcup.org/
    (The Pacific Cup is held in even-numbered years, while the TransPac race from Los Angeles to Diamond Head is held in odd-numbered years.)
    This year there are 58 entries. Only one boat is based in Hawaii -- CIRRUS, a Standfast 40 based here in Kaneohe and owned/skippered/navigated by my friend, the highly experienced racer Bill Myers.
    Bill and his delivery crew left Kaneohe last Tuesday to take CIRRUS to San Francisco, where they'll have little more than a week to get ready to race back home. They're doing daily reports on the delivery and also for the race back, with plenty of photos, route maps and info, and more. Check 'em out at http://cirrus2010.blogspot.com/ .
    Wish I was there.
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    That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    14 boats left San Francisco today and are heading for Hanalei Bay, in the Singlehanded Sailing Society's race. You can view the entrants, blogs, position reports and more at this link.
    I'll be watching the results of Ken 'The General' Roper extra closely, as he's doing this race for the 11th time; we were dockmates for over a decade; and he's an old friend. (Literally, an old friend. A retired Brigadier General, he's 81 years young now.) We did a few doublehanded races together, too.

    I know Matapule will have an opinion about this, based on his comments about singlehanding in another thread. I'm still planning to address that; I just haven't had time.
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    That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Okay, I pulled the quote of Matapule's post (below) out of the thread about Abby Sunderland and switched it over here. (There's also two photos in my reply below.) (And Matapule, did you get my 2nd reply about a slip for you in Hawaii Kai?)

    Quote Originally Posted by matapule View Post
    Okay, let me just spit it out!
    I am totally opposed to single handed sailing, by any gender or age group, for more than 24 hours. International Maritime Law requires that a "proper lookout" be maintained at all times. A single hander cannot stay awake 24/7 while on a voyage. A single hander is breaking an unenforced law. They are putting themsleves and others in danger and those who might need to rescue them.
    On a voyage of over 24 hours, I always require a minimum crew of two. On voyages over 4 days my personal protocol is a minimum crew of 3 on my 40 foot boat. I require a 24 hour watch be maintained at all times
    For the most part, I agree with you. And that's hard for me to say, as a longtime singlehander.
    And here was my baby, my full-time liveaboard home and racer/cruiser, a 43' Polaris double-ended cutter designed by Robert Perry:

    (Sorry about the water damage on the right side. It's blocking the view of the windvane self-steering system. And there's one more singlehand photo coming up below.)
    And first, a note to the uninitiated -- the safest place to be is offshore; the most dangerous is near shore. Close to shore you have countless other pleasure boats and work boats, rocks, reefs, shipping lanes, marker buoys that may be out of position and marker lights that may be out or not blinking in the proper sequence, etc etc. Offshore you have almost none of that, especially if you're well outside of the normal shipping lanes/routes. There are still hazards, like submarines just below the surface (yes, it's happened with yachts hitting submarines or vice versa -- look at the recent Ehime Maru disaster just off Diamond Head a few years ago!) and even more often the risk of hitting a shipping container that fell off its ship. (They don't sink all the way; they usually trap an air bubble and the top 1' or so floats above the water. Incredibly hard to see. I barely missed one at night one time when I was in my powerboat and going about 25 to 30 knots. If I'd hit it, it would've ripped the bottom right off my boat. Fortunately I saw it, avoided it, stopped, called the Coast Guard and reported it, and they had a helicopter come out and drop a marker on it until someone could come tow it in or sink it.) There can be other hazards offshore too -- giant logs that drift away from the Pacific Northwest (they sometimes wash up on the beaches here) and even abandoned sailboats that, left on their own, drift around the seas for years. Abby Sunderland's boat is adrift somewhere near Antarctica. And I know of one racing yacht that was abandoned near San Francisco and several years later was sighted south of Tahiti.
    All of this serves to show why Matapule is absolutely correct in demanding that an adequate lookout be kept at all times, 24/7.
    On some of my singlehanded trips along the west coast of the US and Mexico and South America, I tried as often as possible to find a harbor or cove to pull into at night whenever possible. If nothing was available, I'd hit the NoDoz and nuclear-strength coffee at night and catch catnaps during the daylight hours. No more than two hours at a stretch, and to get acclimated to that sleeping schedule I'd usually start sleeping that way two to three weeks before departure. If you suddenly go from a regular 8-hour nighttime sleep schedule to no more than two hours of daytime sleep and none at night, it'll really mess you up. While sleeping, I used a windvane self-steering device or, if weather conditions wouldn't allow that, an electronic autopilot (with a ton a spare parts).
    On longer trips offshore, if I did see another yacht or a ship I'd radio them to ask their course and speed and I'd also ask if they were aware of any other vessels in the area.
    And like most offshore sailors, I had electronic aids. The primary one was my Furuno radar, with an adjustable alarm system if anyone entered a specific zone and screeched really loud if they did; it also tracked the courses of other vessels. I also had multiple manual radar reflectors, to make sure other ships could see me. (These must be mounted in an X position to give the best return; amateurs hang them in a + position, which is far less effective.) Sorry you can't see any of that in my photo above, as they were located higher on the mast.
    Another point about radar is that wooden boats and wooden masts are much much harder for radar to pick up than fiberglass boats and metal masts, so a good radar reflector, properly mounted, is even more important for woodies. (I had an aluminum mast, but I always thought about filling the inside of it with crumpled up balls of aluminum kitchen foil. It would've made my 43' boat look like an aircraft carrier on someone else's radar, but it would've added too much weight up high where you least want it.)
    It's also smart to use masthead running lights instead of lights mounted at deck level. The higher lights make you visible from a lot farther away. Some singlehanders even turn on a masthead strobe light regularly at night, though that's illegal except in emergencies.
    These days there are far more advanced anti-collision electronics and electronic radar reflectors plus systems and procedures that make singlehanding as safe as humanly possible.
    But singlehanding is still dangerous, as Matapule says. All we singlehanders can do is take every precaution we can and, when offshore and taking a two-hour daylight catnap, hope that any other vessel is fully crewed and standing a good watch and that our electronics are working faithfully.

    And a quick related singlehanding story and photo.
    I used to race a 7' Sabot sailing dinghy, exactly like the El Toro's here. They're about the length of the average living room couch and weigh less than 80 pounds. They're great for teaching children how to sail, and are sometimes raced by adults in a "senior" division. (Not fair for us to race kids directly. We're too experienced, plus if the wind was light I could light a cigarette or a cigar and watch the smoke to read the wind angle. hehehehe)
    Anyway, these tiny boats are almost always used only inside of protected harbors or on lakes. (I sailed one out to the sandbar in Kaneohe Bay a few times, and people were shocked that I dared to do that. Heh.)
    Once a year there was an event called The Ironman Race, where we'd start inside the harbor, go out to the ocean and around the detached breakwater and right back inside the harbor; about 100 yards in the open ocean. "Ironman"? Pffffbt.
    I challenged any adult to race me in a real Ironman event -- 32 miles of open ocean, from Catalina Island to Marina del Rey. Across one of the most heavily trafficked shipping lanes on the west coast. In waves up to 10' to 12' and winds of 15 to 20 knots. And yes, with an escort boat, because I'm not as dumb as I look.
    One guy accepted my challenge, and we did it. I packed a cooler with lunch and water, and had my handheld VHF radio and my cigarettes in a couple of Ziploc bags to keep them dry. The other guy quit less than halfway across, but yours truly finished it and claims the sailing Ironman title.
    Here's a photo about a mile from the finish, taken from my escort boat, after 31 miles of open ocean sailing:


    And like my signature line says...
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    Last edited by LikaNui; June 21st, 2010 at 03:57 PM.
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    That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    The singlehand racers from San Francisco are almost a week into their race to Hanalei Bay. Fascinating blog reports are merged onto the page at this link.
    I especially hope that MenehuneMan is reading that, as it'll give him another look at his own upcoming trip. [/wave to MM]
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    That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    i used to work for a guy who competed in both the Pacific Cup and Trans Pac - and actually did well in both races. It was exciting to follow his boat on the websites.
    "Democracy is the only system that persists in asking the powers that be whether they are the powers that ought to be."
    Sydney J. Harris

  7. #7
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    Thumbs up Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Okay we did it folks! Safe and sound from San Diego to Hilo.
    3 days of sea trials, then 4th day off across the ocean.
    We cast off at 6:40am 2/24.
    headed south along baja mexico, got walloped by a gale (35+ winds, 18-25' seas) for two days.
    into the edge of the high, sunshine, sunburned bum.
    sailed west, following seas and down wind

    broke reaching pole(12 days to go) and self-steering(5 days to go)

    2,776 nautical miles
    26 days, 15 hours at sea
    Tied on in hilo at 9:35pm 3/22

    Hopefully will blog and post photos when I can!!!
    An incredible experience, glad I did it, now off the 'bucket list', will stick to day sails off Waikiki or Kaneohe from now on... HaHa!

    [IMG] this was fun by Menehune Man, on Flickr[/IMG]
    Life is either an adventure... or you're not doing it right!!!

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Wow, what an adventure which means you're doin' life right!

  9. #9
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    Thumbs up Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    HOORAY! You're back safe and sound! I've been thinking about you quite often over the past three weeks, so it's great to hear from you! And I'm obviously looking forward to hearing much more about the trip.
    I mentioned you over in the thread about the tsunami we had on March 11th. If you don't know yet, most of Keehi Lagoon's docks were destroyed and I was wondering if you guys would have a place to put the boat any more. Are you going to help him bring it from Hilo to here? (I also wondered what happened to your own former boats there in Keehi. Let us know, when you find out. 67 boats there are still missing!)
    Looking forward to more info and more photos from you, and again, I'm really glad you made it safely. Well done!
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    That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Quote Originally Posted by Menehune Man View Post
    Okay we did it folks! Safe and sound from San Diego to Hilo.
    MM I am relieved that you have arrived safely and that is no fakakata!

    3 days of sea trials, then 4th day off across the ocean.
    We cast off at 6:40am 2/24.
    headed south along baja mexico, got walloped by a gale (35+ winds, 18-25' seas) for two days.
    I has been a brutal winter along the California/Baja left coast. You have done well kaume'a.

    2,776 nautical miles
    26 days, 15 hours at sea
    Tied on in hilo at 9:35pm 3/22
    I would have done this trip in about 18 days in my 40 foot trawler, but that's the difference in a 30 ft sailboat and and a 40 ft power boat. Where did you turn right off the Baja coast?

    Hopefully will blog and post photos when I can!!!
    You better .......or else!

    An incredible experience, glad I did it, now off the 'bucket list', will stick to day sails off Waikiki or Kaneohe from now on... HaHa!
    Now you don't have to say could've, wouldv'e, should've.

    Blessed be great god Maui
    Peace, Love, and Local Grindz

    People who form FIRM opinions with so little knowledge only pretend to be open-minded. They select their facts like food from a buffet. David R. Dow

  11. #11
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    Thumbs up Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    I gave the new camera I bought to Don for two reasons... too difficult for me and his died just before the trip. I'll see what I can get of their photos later.

    Here are my photos taken and listed in order taken. Any numbers skipped are naturalist shots of us naked that I figure you're not really interested in seeing.
    The Flickr set

    Please ask questions or leave comments.
    I posted comments on many shots for context.

    Enjoy... I did!
    Life is either an adventure... or you're not doing it right!!!

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Liked a nice Flickr set of the sail to Hilo. Looks like you folks ate fairly well. Boat must have been well stocked.
    I'm still here. Are you?

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    Thumbs up Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Quote Originally Posted by mel View Post
    Looks like you folks ate fairly well. Boat must have been well stocked.
    We honestly had enough canned goods for the 3 of us to get by for at least 3 months. And supplementing that with fresh Mahimahi? Priceless!
    Life is either an adventure... or you're not doing it right!!!

  14. #14
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    Thumbs up Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Quote Originally Posted by Menehune Man View Post
    Okay we did it folks! Safe and sound from San Diego to Hilo.
    3 days of sea trials, then 4th day off across the ocean.
    We cast off at 6:40am 2/24.
    headed south along baja mexico, got walloped by a gale (35+ winds, 18-25' seas) for two days.
    into the edge of the high, sunshine, sunburned bum.
    sailed west, following seas and down wind

    broke reaching pole(12 days to go) and self-steering(5 days to go)

    2,776 nautical miles
    26 days, 15 hours at sea
    Tied on in hilo at 9:35pm 3/22

    Hopefully will blog and post photos when I can!!!
    An incredible experience, glad I did it, now off the 'bucket list', will stick to day sails off Waikiki or Kaneohe from now on... HaHa!

    [IMG] this was fun by Menehune Man, on Flickr[/IMG]
    As I mentioned before... Don and I met in '86, have been friends and with him trying to move here ever since, now he's arriving Oct. 5th!
    I've been caretaker for Kolohe and this morning completed a(nother) complete scrub down so she's all shiny. Will be sailing soon... yippee!


    Kolohe by Menehune Man
    Last edited by Menehune Man; October 3rd, 2011 at 03:54 PM. Reason: Correct grammar
    Life is either an adventure... or you're not doing it right!!!

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Is he visiting or staying for good?
    And did you see the 36' powerboat that sank in its slip there in Keehi a few days ago?
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    That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

  16. #16
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    Smile Re: Sailing-Hawaii connection?

    Quote Originally Posted by LikaNui View Post
    Is he visiting or staying for good?
    And did you see the 36' powerboat that sank in its slip there in Keehi a few days ago?
    He's staying for good... at least as a 'home port'!
    Didn't know of that sinking? Was it at the State docks? Kolohe's at KMC.

    Don't think I've shared this photo of shortly after Don and I met in 1986!
    He and Kevin had just sailed down from Vancouver Island and I worked at Keehi Marine Center while living aboard my Pearson 26' sailboat anchored out in Keehi Lagoon for free. Boy those were the days my friend! Veronica is an ex-girlfriend of mine. So here ya go! Hey Likanui... am I funny looking too?!


    Kevin, Me, Veronica, & Don
    Life is either an adventure... or you're not doing it right!!!

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