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Thread: Thiefs and thefts during the Christmas 2011 holiday

  1. #26
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    Exclamation Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by bueller555 View Post
    Maybe the ghosts of Christmas past visited all of these people and they each had their own epiphanies?
    Thread drift possibly but...
    And don't we all at this time of year? Yikes!
    Life is either an adventure... or you're not doing it right!!!

  2. #27

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoGeek View Post
    If she's entitled to the wreath, then all is good and distributing the video was a mistake. If she's not entitled to it, then her body language is all the more galling. She certainly seems to think she's entitled.

    But the news reports indicate that she wasn't entitled to it.

    I agree with FM. I think she decided previously to take it. There's no obvious hesitation or decision process on her part. She goes for it.

    I am not shocked at all about the lady's casual, smug attitude regarding this theft.


    She has probably stolen things before....and probably in a similar manner.


    Repeated behavior becomes natural.



    Also, when you steal something...thieves say the best way is to be 100% relaxed and confident.

    That way, your body language will not give yourself away to others that you are in fact, committing a crime.


    Just like how those people at Toys R Us strolled out the door...calm, relaxed, smiling.

    If I had walked by, I would have assumed they bought the items.



    If you see someone running, looking nervous, scared....now THAT's going to attract attention.

  3. #28

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by pumpkinboy View Post
    If I had walked by, I would have assumed they bought the items.
    Even at 3am?

  4. #29

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Earlier, I said that the Toys R Us theft has little in relation to the Xmas Wreath incident. But I couldn't help but make some comments to the latest revelations re: the toy thieves.

    Toys R Us thieves linked to TV theft at Walmart

    Recall local attorney Myles Breiner's involvement in the case. Breiner, imagining himself as some kind of legal savior for these poor, disadvantaged criminals, had this to say when 4 of the 6 shoplifters turned themselves in.

    24 items in all.

    "We think that covers everything," said Breiner.
    Nope. HPD claims that 20 more items are still missing from the store's inventory, some of which are indentifiable on the security camera footage.

    Mr. Breiner, it appears that your clients are holding out on you. Not a good way to plead a lesser sentence in court, huh?

    Breiner is helping the group pro bono.
    You're representing this shoplifting ring "pro bono?" LOL!!! Now that your clients are being linked to another major theft, I'll wager that deep down inside, you're regretting your decision to represent these crooks.

    Did you make the pro bono offer for the publicity? Well, the publicity you'll be getting will be mostly negative for yourself, representing defendants who will generate little to no sympathy from the general public.

    When asked what he thinks should happen to his clients, Breiner replied: "They should be treated fairly. They returned the items. The items that were stolen were all for children. All the items were wrapped as gift packages."
    The items were stolen for the children? LOL! Since when is it the norm to give a young child a 40" flat-screen TV as a Xmas gift?

    Face it, Mr. Breiner. Nobody in their right mind will buy into your sob story about those chronic shoplifters stealing in order to give Xmas gifts to their kids. Anyone with half a brain knows they were planning to fence the merchandise.

    Breiner says the group is hoping for no jail time, just probation and or community service.

    "I don't think jail is appropriate under these circumstances, especially if they're single mothers then you're going to have children that are going to become the custody of Child Protective Services," said Breiner.
    Are you kidding me??? Until those single mothers are able to straighten out their act, putting their children under the care of CPS is probably the best thing for those kids. Sorry to break the news to ya, Mr. Breiner. But this is one case where the public will not shed a single tear for a parent losing custody of their child to CPS.

    I just love it when self-aggrandizing attorneys get their comeuppance.
    This post may contain an opinion that may conflict with your opinion. Do not take it personal. Polite discussion of difference of opinion is welcome.

  5. #30

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankie's Market View Post
    Did you make the pro bono offer for the publicity? Well, the publicity you'll be getting will be mostly negative for yourself, representing defendants who will generate little to no sympathy from the general public.
    The question is what market is he intending to target?
    Last edited by helen; December 30th, 2011 at 09:51 PM. Reason: fixing the quote tag

  6. #31

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoGeek View Post
    The question is what market is he intending to target?
    Don't know what you mean by that.

    You think Myles Breiner took on this case to attract similar clients? (i.e. habitual criminals who can't afford a lawyer, but has a sad story to tell?)

    Gecko, if those are the kind of people Breiner wants to help, he should have just been a public defender.
    This post may contain an opinion that may conflict with your opinion. Do not take it personal. Polite discussion of difference of opinion is welcome.

  7. #32

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoGeek View Post
    The question is what market is he intending to target?
    Publicity for himself and his practice, most likely.

  8. #33

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankie's Market View Post
    Don't know what you mean by that.

    You think Myles Breiner took on this case to attract similar clients? (i.e. habitual criminals who can't afford a lawyer, but has a sad story to tell?)
    I think they can scrape up some money when their freedom is on the line. People are rather addicted to freedom.



    Quote Originally Posted by Frankie's Market View Post
    Gecko, if those are the kind of people Breiner wants to help, he should have just been a public defender.
    That's one route, but not the only one. Next time I see one of my lawyer friends, I'll ask. They may have some insight.

  9. #34

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    I agree with Leo. The guy did it for the publicity. The incriminating camera footage was broadcasted on KHON and was generating a lot of comments online, as well as tips to HPD. When the shoplifters called Breiner for help/advice, he probably saw this as a golden opportunity to make a name for himself on the news as some kind of champion for the underdog. Trouble with that plan now is,... people know those shoplifters weren't stealing to put gifts underneath the Xmas tree for their kids. Breiner won't be defending clients who can be portrayed as modern day Jean Valjeans. They're part of a shoplifting ring facing felony theft charges.

    I mean, c'mon! 20 toys are still missing from the Toys R Us inventory? If by some remote chance they're telling the truth and they were all gifts for their kids, then there should be no problem giving those items back. But my hunch is,.... they won't be able to. The missing toys have already been sold. Opps! So much for the "single moms who didn't want to spoil Xmas for their children" defense.
    This post may contain an opinion that may conflict with your opinion. Do not take it personal. Polite discussion of difference of opinion is welcome.

  10. #35

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankie's Market View Post
    I agree with Leo. The guy did it for the publicity. The incriminating camera footage was broadcasted on KHON and was generating a lot of comments online, as well as tips to HPD. When the shoplifters called Breiner for help/advice, he probably saw this as a golden opportunity to make a name for himself on the news as some kind of champion for the underdog. Trouble with that plan now is,... people know those shoplifters weren't stealing to put gifts underneath the Xmas tree for their kids. Breiner won't be defending clients who can be portrayed as modern day Jean Valjeans. They're part of a shoplifting ring facing felony theft charges.
    We all agree it's for the publicity. Where we disagree is how he felt about his clients when he took the case.

    Looking at his site, he's no stranger to publicity, nor defending guilty people. I don't think he's been surprised at all.

  11. #36

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoGeek View Post
    Where we disagree is how he felt about his clients when he took the case.
    I think you and Frankie both know that most attorneys work on cases that they think they can win, that their personal feelings about the clients are not really a factor.

  12. #37

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Lakio View Post
    I think you and Frankie both know that most attorneys work on cases that they think they can win
    Define "win" in this situation? Reduced sentence?

  13. #38

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by GeckoGeek View Post
    Define "win" in this situation? Reduced sentence?
    Yeah, that would do it. Leave it up to public opinion, and the clients will be excoriated; if he can get them something considerably less than the maximum punishment, that plus getting his name in the press again, is likely of value to him.

  14. #39

    Default Re: Christmas Wreath Thief

    Quote Originally Posted by Leo Lakio View Post
    I think you and Frankie both know that most attorneys work on cases that they think they can win, that their personal feelings about the clients are not really a factor.
    True for the most part. But you better believe there are cases when attorneys have been left looking foolish by clients who provide false/misleading affidavits, which are later exposed during an investigation. This is true for defense attorneys, as well as prosecutors who have been duped by "defendants-turned-witness" who are discovered to be non-credible.
    This post may contain an opinion that may conflict with your opinion. Do not take it personal. Polite discussion of difference of opinion is welcome.

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