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Thread: Hawaiian Geology

  1. #26
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    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    OK..... Please inform us.... do we have a major landslide event in our near future????????????????????????

    Where should I run to???


    Quote Originally Posted by Amati View Post
    I saw the SHINKAI 6500 on a tour:

    The submarine geology of the Nuuanu (perhaps the largest landslide in the world) and Wailau landslides was investigated during 1999, using the SHINKAI 6500 manned submersible and its mother ship, R.V. YOKOSUKA. Observations were made at eight dive sites, and about 100 in-situ rock samples were collected from the landslide deposits at depths of 2500 to 4500 meters.

    The Hono Advertiser reported: "The extent of the Nuuanu slide is impressive", and continued "a single block of rubble known as the Tuscaloosa Seamount stretches 13 miles wide by 17 miles long, the size of Lanai".

    A crewman gave us small piece from a slide, collected at 4,000+ meters. How cool is that!
    Be Yourself. Everyone Else Is Taken!
    ~ ~
    Kaʻonohiʻulaʻokahōkūmiomioʻehiku
    Spreading the virus of ALOHA.
    Oh Chu. If only you could have seen what I've seen, with your eyes.

  2. #27

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    Not likely in the near future but it will happen again. They seem to happen only once every 100 or 200 thousand years so odds of one happening during our lifetimes are fantastically small. Where to go if one happens? Very high. An airplane would do it, just stay up for a while and everything would be fairly normal given you could find a place to land. Geologists also are concerned about a volcano in the Canary Islands that could lose a flank and send a tsunami toward the east coast of North America. That coast, being fairly flat, would suffer a lot of damage while the west coast's mountains would probably bounce tsunami waves from Hawai'i or elsewhere back out to sea.

  3. #28

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    The Mystery of the Three caves
    The name Keanakolu means just that.
    The few lava caves of Mauna Kea and Hualalai are another rarity.
    The carvings in wood found there are truly astonishing.
    From what model could those carvers have created these sculptures?

  4. #29

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    There was a survey on the safest states from the natural environment viewpoint, Hawai'i was rated the safest state. Makes sense. Not many blizzards, tornados probably happen but very rarely, hurricanes unfortunately do happen but are pretty rare, the earthquakes (olai) mostly have been pretty mild, the volcanos do not explode, there are big storms but not usually violent like something you'd see in New England. Of course I don't remember the source, it was something like the history channel, reasonably reliable I guess. So insurance rates should reflect the lower risk and lower loss.

  5. #30

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalalau View Post
    So insurance rates should reflect the lower risk and lower loss.
    I'm not so sure about that. Safety and property loss are two different things. Some of the biggest threats to Hawaii are hurricanes and tidal waves. In most cases, we have an adequate warning system to allow us to seek safe shelter.

    A quick look at what happened to Kauai shows the difference. Few deaths, but plenty of property damage.

  6. #31

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    True. We were on Kaua'i within about a year of Iniki, people told us the wind gauge at Koke'e broke at 184. Seeing mile after mile after mile of rubble piled along the highway was seriously heart breaking, so many peoples lives destroyed. There are some disasters you know can happen but prefer to just not think about. Hope to God Honolulu never gets hit.

  7. #32
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    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    Quote Originally Posted by lensperson View Post
    The Mystery of the Three caves
    The name Keanakolu means just that.
    The few lava caves of Mauna Kea and Hualalai are another rarity.
    The carvings in wood found there are truly astonishing.
    From what model could those carvers have created these sculptures?
    Do you have online access to photos of the carvings? Are they ancient ki`i? Or modern?
    I read of a carved Koa tree there, but no photo was found.
    Be Yourself. Everyone Else Is Taken!
    ~ ~
    Kaʻonohiʻulaʻokahōkūmiomioʻehiku
    Spreading the virus of ALOHA.
    Oh Chu. If only you could have seen what I've seen, with your eyes.

  8. #33

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    The gulch behind Kawaihae has been ransacked.
    The hidden caves have been looted.
    There are still some amazing carvings to be seen at the
    Bishop Museum.

  9. #34

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    One of my pet projects is trying to build a chronology of snow events
    on Hualalai.
    From what I've read there was a snowfall in 1937.
    Earlier there was another in 1911 as written in early Hawaiian newspapers
    printed in the Hawaiian language.
    Yet earlier in 1862 was a report in Hoku Loa 3/1862, p34
    of another snowfall .The correspondent recalls having seen another snow event
    circa 1832.
    Google "nupepa snow" and some some further stuff is there.

  10. #35
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    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    Quote Originally Posted by lensperson View Post
    The gulch behind Kawaihae has been ransacked.
    The hidden caves have been looted.
    There are still some amazing carvings to be seen at the
    Bishop Museum.
    Mahalo, as a former curator there, I m certain I will be able to find them.

    If not, Menehune Man will help to ease my way, 2 b sure.
    Be Yourself. Everyone Else Is Taken!
    ~ ~
    Kaʻonohiʻulaʻokahōkūmiomioʻehiku
    Spreading the virus of ALOHA.
    Oh Chu. If only you could have seen what I've seen, with your eyes.

  11. #36

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    The carvings were created by artists.
    These sculptures were expressions of political sentiment in a
    very closely ruled society.
    No wonder they were hidden.

  12. #37

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    The usual belief is that Hawaiians had no written language. Yet if certain ideographs held generally understood meanings they were not very different from Chinese or Japanese ideographs. I don't know if this was the case. Were there certain ideographs that meant for example 'kapu' or transmitted other generally understood meanings?

  13. #38

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    Extremely interesting.
    I sat for awhile and thought about it.
    In my view the pictographs are every bit as valid a written language
    as we now see. A very few symbols, letters, can convey an amazing amount
    of information.
    The writings on the stones are messages from the past waiting for
    listeners in the future.
    We are those listeners.

  14. #39
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    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalalau View Post
    The usual belief is that Hawaiians had no written language. Yet if certain ideographs held generally understood meanings they were not very different from Chinese or Japanese ideographs. I don't know if this was the case. Were there certain ideographs that meant for example 'kapu' or transmitted other generally understood meanings?
    Leinani Melville produced a book called "The Children of the Rainbow" in which he (she?) displayed numerous ideographs, one of which is the foundation behind my name and is represented in my icon.

    Ka`onohi`ula`okahokumiomio`ehiku
    Roughly translated as "the red (eye) in the center of the seven-pointed star."

    A hawai`i spiritual group on Hawai`i (hawaii.org) called it the "Eye of Kanaloa," and likened it to a navigational symbol for sailing Polynesia. I have an Hawaiian compass and intend (some day) to make comparisons.

    Melville also had many other symbols. If still in print, it could be an interesting study. If not, come to Kahalu`u and peruse my copy (bring wine, preferably Savignon Blanc!) Or empty handed, I don't really care.

    PM me for directions, and appropriate times.
    Be Yourself. Everyone Else Is Taken!
    ~ ~
    Kaʻonohiʻulaʻokahōkūmiomioʻehiku
    Spreading the virus of ALOHA.
    Oh Chu. If only you could have seen what I've seen, with your eyes.

  15. #40

    Default Re: Hawaiian Geology

    PRE-COOK European contact with Hawaii
    It seems like somebody visited the Islands prior to Cook.
    The early Hawaiians were aware of Iron,but where did it come from?
    There may have been Hawaiians that sailed as far as the west coast of north america.
    The local carvings of the Coast Salish certainly make one
    stroke ones chin in bemusement

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