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Thread: New lava gradually rumbling beneath Mt Saint Helens

  1. #1

    Default New lava gradually rumbling beneath Mt Saint Helens

    There have been signs that this volcano may be getting ready to blast off again.

    Behind Kona is Hualalai ,of 8000 feet.

    In 1802 a couple of flows got all the way to the sea.

    The usgs web site has great data on these.

    The island of Maui has the Hale aka la area.
    It is a huge valley incorporating several cinder cones that blew not too long ago.

    The last eruption date is still in dispute and is a subject of considerable interest.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: New lava gradually rumbling beneath Mt Saint Helens

    I am confused here. The title of your post says Mt Saint Helens which is in the State of Washington. You make no reference to it in the body of the post. I suspect you are referencing Mt Saint Helens when you said "that this volcano".

    However the rest of your post references a volcano on the Big Island and another one in Maui.

    Then you end the post by saying: The last eruption date is still in dispute and is a subject of considerable interest.

    Which begs the question which volcano are you talking about? And why are comparing two volcanos in the State of Hawaii that hasn't had any activity for quite some time to a mountain in the State of Washington that destroyed its top in the 1980's and still has activity to it today?

  3. #3

    Default Re: New lava gradually rumbling beneath Mt Saint Helens

    Thanks for helping me to clarify my thoughts.


    the main three volcanos that are very interesting are Hualalai , Hale A kala ,
    and Mauna Kea, the last known blast from Mauna Kea may have been as little as six thousand years ago.

    It is well documented that Hualalai had flows in 1801 .

    As far as Hale a kala that vast area still has areas of gradually rising warmth.


    On the island of Maui are found the last flows at Perouse point.


    The data is really vague as to whether this was a radiocarbon dating error or what.

    We decided to follow it up.


    A long slender line of lava from that last flow on Maui still carried many kilowatts of geothermal energy.

    The video crew are on the ground and we expect some results soon.
    Last edited by lensperson; May 8th, 2014 at 11:16 PM.

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