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Thread: Got milk? Soy milk, that is.

  1. #1

    Default Got milk? Soy milk, that is.

    Rep. Welch's press release:
    Welch leads bipartisan effort to stop the illegal branding of "fake milk" as real milk.
    Some members of Congress have
    today urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to exercise its legal authority to investigate and take action against the manufacturers of products they falsely claim to be milk.
    The milk industry has seen a drop in milk prices paid to dairymen, as well as a drop in sales to consumers. At the same time, sales of products such as soy milk, rice milk, and almond milk have increased dramatically.

    So what is to blame? Oh, of course! The culprit is the non-dairy industry's misuse of the word milk, and the public's inability to realize that soy/rice/almond milk does not come from cows.

    What's the fix? Banning non-dairy products from having the work "milk" in their name. For us dumb consumers, well we need all the help we can get in realizing that soy milk comes from a plant not a cow.

    It can't be the the reason of a decrease in the consumption of cow's milk has to do with concerns over hormones and other ingredients that are introduced into milk, could it? Or those of us who remember the heptachlor debacle of the early 1980's when we started taking note about milk contaminants, and in the years since have reduced our consumption and found other alternatives?
    Flashback news: Heptachlor in milk, NYTimes, May 23, 1982:
    Findings Not Told for 2 Months
    Laboratory technicians at the health department discovered the contamination in Oahu's milk in January but did not report it to their superiors until March 11.
    Tests confirmed by Federal laboratories on the mainland showed that milk from cows that had been fed so-called ''green chop'' of shredded pineapple leaves had become contaminated with the heptachlor. Although none of the green chop was supposed to be used as cattle feed for at least a year after the spraying, some of it apparently slipped into the feeding bins.
    Today there remains by many concerns about bovine growth hormone (BGH), illegal usage of antibiotics, etc, which affects the consumers' desires for alternatives. So, while it is great that there are alternatives to cow milk, what drives many of us away is not that there are indeed alternatives, but that we just don't want milk to be part of our day-to-day diet. Relabeling soy milk with a new name will not matter to me, I"ll just buy the product under its new name, but at the same time THAT isn't going to save the milk industry from its decline, because that decline comes from within the milk industry's practices that it employs.

    [Hummm, wonder if that will affect Milk of Magnesia, too?]
    Now run along and play, but donít get into trouble.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Got milk? Soy milk, that is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Amati View Post
    [Hummm, wonder if that will affect Milk of Magnesia, too?]
    Or Milk Duds.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Got milk? Soy milk, that is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Honoruru View Post
    Or Milk Duds.
    Ha, good one!

    Yikes, I hope they don't mess with "coconut milk", we'll all have to make new recipe ingredient names for haupia.

    Now run along and play, but donít get into trouble.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Got milk? Soy milk, that is.

    Food names that could fool us dumb consumers, maybe these should be banned also:

    soda POP (drink my father?)
    hot DOG (cook my doggie?)
    ROYAL CREAM crackers (made for kings? made with cream?)
    HEAD of lettuce (now that's just awful)
    LADY FINGER cookies (body parts left over from the HEAD of lettuce?)
    BEAR CLAW pastry (you mean its not really a bear's paw?)
    Now run along and play, but donít get into trouble.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Got milk? Soy milk, that is.

    MMMMMmmmm, I just finished a glass of cold "Soy Non-Dairy Beverage". Meanwhile, in my fridge is Silk "Almondmilk" (with the small notation on the container of it being "dairy-free, gluten-free, soy-free").

    I guess the banning of using the term "milk" for non-dairy products did not go through. But is the soy industry getting a jump on new labeling in case it eventually does?
    Now run along and play, but donít get into trouble.

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