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Thread: Wal-Mart War Room

  1. #1

    Default Wal-Mart War Room

    OK, so I decided to play by da rules of dis board and started this thread here instead of putting the article below in the second Walmart at Keeaumoku folder. Just change the country but the issues remain the same...

    Miulang


    Wal-Mart at Mexico Ruins Sparks Protest
    By Lorraine Orlandi, Reuters

    TEOTIHUACAN, Mexico (Sept. 11) - Burning incense and sounding a conch shell horn, residents of an ancient Mexican city protested on Saturday at the construction of a Wal-Mart store on the edge of the ruins

    AP
    A Teotihuacan pyramid, the archeological site 18 miles from Mexico City.

    The sprawling warehouse-style Bodega Aurrera, a unit of Wal-Mart in Mexico, is due to open in December in Teotihuacan, a major archeological site outside Mexico City.

    Opponents say it will ruin a way of life that dates back centuries and have taken legal action to stop it, in a fight that gives a grand dimension to the classic battle between big business and small-town values.

    "What they are doing in Teotihuacan is destroying Mexico's deepest roots for short-term interests like lower prices," local teacher Emanuel D'Herrera told about a dozen protesters outside Teotihuacan's town hall. "This is the flag of conquest by global interests, the symbol of the destruction of our culture."

    Other protesters bearing placards against the "gringo business" entered the town hall and pledged to stay there until the mayor heard them out.

    U.S.-based Wal-Mart, the world's biggest retailer, faces increasing opposition in the United States as it stretches beyond its rural roots and into urban areas. Voters in a Los Angeles suburb recently rejected a Wal-Mart supercenter, and other communities have passed ordinances blocking its so-called big-box stores.

    The Teotihuacan construction site lies less than a mile from the gated tourist park housing the main ruins and is visible from atop the Pyramid of the Sun that has defined the skyline for 2,000 years.

    UPHILL BATTLE

    Local activists know they are fighting a steep uphill battle. Wal-Mart Mexico has local and state approval for the store and construction is well under way.

    "I support the store, it will save me time and money," said Camilo Olivas, a father of four who works for the federal electricity commission in Teotihuacan.

    He drives 10 minutes every two weeks to shop at a Wal-Mart store in another town to find low prices.

    But a handful of opponents say Wal-Mart will kill local family-owned enterprises and erode a lifestyle dating back centuries, while sucking income from locals.

    They have filed a criminal complaint, charging authorities with acting illegally in approving the project. They filed a civil complaint on the same grounds and asked the nation's rights ombudsman to step in.

    Amid rising controversy, Mexico's government this month said a small pre-Hispanic altar was found buried at the construction site. Plans call for preserving the small structure under plexiglass in what will be the store's parking lot.



    "Mexico is one of the few places in the world where the seeds of culture and religion remain," said Tim Sikyea, or Lonely Eagle, a Dene Indian from the Northwest Territories in Canada who came to Teotihuacan this weekend for an annual ceremony with indigenous peoples from across the continent.

    "When you have big business come in you lose touch with that culture."

    No one knows for sure who founded the ancient seat of power and then abandoned it around 600 A.D. The Aztecs later came upon it and named it Teotihuacan (The Place Where Men Become Gods).


    09/11/04 17:44 ET

    And something from our friends in the British Press:

    The Sun, Moon and Wal-Mart!

    The Times, London

    TEOTIHUACAN, Sept. 11. — Ancient Pyramids of the Sun and the Moon at Teotihuacan, one of Mexico’s most prized archaeological sites and most popular tourist attractions, have a new neighbour — a Wal-Mart warehouse that has enraged academics and locals in equal measure.
    The US retail giant has almost completed its hypermarket, much to the dismay of local residents and cultural organisations. The local office of Unesco, the United Nations cultural body, has joined calls for an investigation into how Wal-Mart was allowed to proceed on 3.7 acres that is part of the archaeological site.
    It has taken up the fight of local pressure groups who hope to block the opening of the store, due in December. In response to local protests, the government has promised that the construction permits will indeed be reviewed by the National Council for Culture and the Arts.
    But local activists are in no mood to give up the fight.
    “We’ll put a stop to this with demolition, because a transnational corporation can’t just come and trample on our historical patrimony,” said Mr Lorenzo Trujillo, the head of the Civic Front for the Defence of the Valley of Teotihuacan, which represents some 100 local residents. In late July, about 50 members of the Civic Front occupied the building site for three days, demanding that construction be halted. The protest ended peacefully but construction continued. Wal-Mart threatened to take the protesters to court.
    Critics say the modern warehouse design of the store, which has become a standard bearer of the creeping US cultural invasion of Mexico, clashes with the 1,400-year-old site.
    Not everyone in the area opposes the project. Some welcome the store for the low prices, investment and jobs it will bring. “This is a development opportunity,” Mr Jorge Lopez, the town secretary, said. “We need water, drainage, pavement, schools.”
    Wal-Mart claims that its own privately-hired archaeologist found few items of archaeological interest while the foundations of the store were being laid.
    Mexican officials say a small pre-Hispanic altar was found buried under what will be the store’s parking lot.
    -----------
    Walmart workers in Las Vegas have started their own website (http://www.walmartworkerslv.com) as part of their campaign to have the United Food and Commercial Workers Union represent them. The website is pretty interesting because it includes all kinds of stuff about anti-union actions that Walmart has taken around the world.

    Normally, I'm against unions (I'm salaried, after all) but in cases where a company so grossly violates equal opportunity laws and discriminates against its workers for the sake of making individuals rich, then I say, "Power to the People!"
    Last edited by Miulang; September 11th, 2004 at 09:29 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Miulang
    residents of an ancient Mexican city protested on Saturday at the construction of a Wal-Mart store on the edge of the ruins

    The sprawling warehouse-style Bodega Aurrera, a unit of Wal-Mart in Mexico, is due to open in December in Teotihuacan, a major archeological site outside Mexico City.

    Opponents say it will ruin a way of life that dates back centuries

    this just absolutely burns my ass.
    I need no further provocation to equate walmart with the antichrist. cuz i knew they were already.
    But if this doesn't sway any walmart lovers...
    well, then, their heart, mind and soul are made of coal. and dense rock.

  3. #3

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    "Amid rising controversy, Mexico's government this month said a small pre-Hispanic altar was found buried at the construction site. Plans call for preserving the small structure under plexiglass in what will be the store's parking lot."

    This is the other part of that first article I posted that fries me. Does that mean at every new WM site, whenever they uncover relics or artifacts that they're going to encase said relics under plexiglass in the middle of the macadam??? That's supposed to be respectful??? That, and the fact that the Mexican government apparently approved the construction permit based on the say-so of an archeologist who was hired by WalMart!

    Miulang

    BTW:What did they do with the bones they uncovered at the Keeaumoku site anyway?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Miulang

    BTW:What did they do with the bones they uncovered at the Keeaumoku site anyway?
    they are under plexiglass in the Needless Markups store ala moana

  5. #5

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by kimo55
    they are under plexiglass in the Needless Markups store ala moana
    Bahahaha!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    It's just ashame that nothing happens to those who desecrate gravesites. The building still gets constructed and "life goes on" (is this one of the forbidden phrases)! People too often forget...again keep reminding us Kimo!!!
    Retired Senior Member

  7. #7

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear, PERIOD

    So as not to sully the purity of the other Walmart thread, here's some more fodder for why people should think twice about shopping either at Walmart or Sam's Club:

    Pro-subsidy, anti-union

    Ironically, founder Sam Walton's rules for building a business retail include valuing "associates" and sharing rewards. Last year, Wal-Mart generated $265 billion in revenue and had about $9.1 billion in net income. Today there are 5,000 stores in 10 countries, including Argentina, South Korea and China. When Walton died in 1992, he was second only to Bill Gates for title of the world's richest man.

    The impressive growth has come at a high price. In May, Good Jobs First, a nonprofit research center that promotes corporate and government accountability, released a report showing Wal-Mart received more than one billion dollars in subsidies from local and state governments, including sales tax rebates, free or reduced-priced land, tax-increment-financing, state corporate income tax credits and property tax abatements. The study was partially funded by the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union.

    Labor unions have their own fight to pick with Wal-Mart. Although the UFCW recently won accreditation and the right to represent employees in a Quebec Wal-Mart, it has yet to successfully organize in the United States. In 2000, meat cutters in a Jacksonville, Texas store voted to organize and shortly after that the company announced it was closing the department. Wal-Mart's official position on unions is: "We do not believe there is a need for third-party representation."


    Read the whole story here: http://www.alternet.org/rights/19901/

    Miulang

  8. #8
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear, PERIOD

    Quote Originally Posted by Miulang

    Ironically, founder Sam Walton's rules for building a business retail include valuing "associates" and sharing rewards.Miulang

    also, Sam Walton started with a BuyAmerican slant and he tried to procure, sell and support american made products.


    remniscient of the disney corp. debacle. totally different animal than what Walt Disney "imagineered"

  9. #9

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear, PERIOD

    Quote Originally Posted by kimo55
    also, Sam Walton started with a BuyAmerican slant and he tried to procure, sell and support american made products.


    remniscient of the disney corp. debacle. totally different animal than what Walt Disney "imagineered"
    Heh. Did you notice how quickly they got rid of that campaign? Even back then (wasn't that in the early 90s?) it was damned near impossible to find anything that was manufactured and assembled 100% in the US. Imagine what it must be like now with all the outsourcing going on????

    Miulang

    As an aside: next time you eat macadamia nuts, see if the label tells where those nuts were grown...they may be from Australia, Central America or Southeast Asia even though they might have a "Hawaiian" logo on the box!

  10. #10
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear, PERIOD

    Quote Originally Posted by Miulang
    As an aside: next time you eat macadamia nuts, see if the label tells where those nuts were grown...they may be from Australia, Central America or Southeast Asia even though they might have a "Hawaiian" logo on the box!

    I checked a can of mac nuts i have lying around da tiki bar here. saw the address for the orchards and processing offices.. did a search on the internet .
    the address found on the internet shows a new Walmart there.

  11. #11

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear, PERIOD

    Quote Originally Posted by kimo55
    I checked a can of mac nuts i have lying around da tiki bar here. saw the address for the orchards and processing offices.. did a search on the internet .
    the address found on the internet shows a new Walmart there.
    ROFLMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  12. #12

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Haha! Now that growth in the US appears to be slowing down, our buddies in Bentonville now have their eyes on.....RUSSIA!

    Holy cow! I never thought WM would bring about detente. A true victory for capitalism if WM gets a toehold in Russia...Capitalism topples Communism! Wow! Would Lenin and Stalin be pickled pink or what???

    More here: http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.j...toryID=6257979

    Miulang

    Actually, if WM did put up a store say, in Moscow, if ever I visited there I certainly would stop by to pick up a few matryoshka dolls. Those cost a pretty penny here in the States.
    Last edited by Miulang; September 17th, 2004 at 10:50 AM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Miulang
    Actually, if WM did put up a store say, in Moscow, if ever I visited there I certainly would stop by to pick up a few matryoshka dolls. Those cost a pretty penny here in the States.

    are those the nesting dolls?

  14. #14

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by kimo55
    are those the nesting dolls?
    Yuppers. Maybe I could pick up a few Ukranian Easter eggs, too.

    Miulang

  15. #15
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Miulang
    Yuppers. Maybe I could pick up a few Ukranian Easter eggs, too.

    Miulang

    we have got some of those;
    hawaiian royalty as well as tiki theme russian nesting dolls here in waikiki.

  16. #16

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by kimo55
    we have got some of those;
    hawaiian royalty as well as tiki theme russian nesting dolls here in waikiki.
    You can't call them Russian if they're not made in Russia! (Semionovo). If you want to read about the evolution of the matryoshka, go here:http://russian-crafts.com/nest/history.html#name

    Dem dere tiki thangs would be called "Hawaiian nesting tikis".

    Miulang

  17. #17

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Shoot..this news story says they're building in St. Petersburg (formerly known as Leningrad). Wonder why they bypassed Moscow? Could Vladimir Putin be against WM?

    Miulang

    Da link from da Moscow Times: http://c.moreover.com/click/here.pl?x203073287
    Last edited by Miulang; September 17th, 2004 at 11:26 AM.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Miulang
    You can't call them Russian if they're not made in Russia! (Semionovo). If you want to read about the evolution of the matryoshka, go here:http://russian-crafts.com/nest/history.html#name

    Dem dere tiki thangs would be called "Hawaiian nesting tikis".

    Miulang

    well, they are russian hawaiian nesting tikis.

  19. #19

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by kimo55
    well, they are russian hawaiian nesting tikis.
    Heh. I know da Russians wanted to annex Hawaii long time ago. You telling me dis how dey going succeed???

  20. #20
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    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in Mexico

    Quote Originally Posted by Miulang
    Heh. I know da Russians wanted to annex Hawaii long time ago. You telling me dis how dey going succeed???

    maybe; they send over these lil
    trojan horses for us to have in our homes....

    come ta think of it. really should look insai all of these nesting tikis!

  21. #21

    Default Re: WalMart also strikes fear in FL

    You just knew there would be more news about Walmart from some part of the world, didn'tya?

    Well, this time it's from Dubya's bruddah Jebbie's state. Jebbie and his cabinet stayed a decision by an administrative judge who determined the 24hour megamart that WM wanted to build in downtown Jacksonville didn't meet the requirements of the city's growth management plan. Hmmm...that ole Jeb Bush is turning out to be quite a little rebel, isn't he? Going against all that is American (like Dubya and the flag)?

    Read on: http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-onlin...858AR500.shtml

    Miulang

  22. #22

    Default A Day without a Walmart mention is a day without...

    some new observation or conflict!

    This from The Chicago Tribune this morning. I had to copy it in its entirety because you can only access this story if you have an account...

    Never even thought about the fact that the big box stores might also be killing off local printed newspapers (aw, who cares about them anyway? Just go digital...get rid of all the advertising...)

    Miulang

    Growth of Wal-Mart bad news for papers
    Study shows drag on ad spending

    By Leon Lazaroff
    Tribune national correspondent
    Published September 22, 2004

    Newspaper advertising this year has been a major disappointment to both the papers and their investors.

    But while everything has been blamed, from the war in Iraq to a struggling economy, a study Tuesday said the problem is deeper and will continue.

    Call it the "Wal-Mart effect."

    "Wal-Mart and stores like them don't simply advertise in newspapers the way traditional department stores do," said Paul Ginocchio, a Deutsche Bank Securities media analyst and the report's chief author. "Most troubling for newspapers is that this isn't going away. It's actually accelerating."

    Since the early 1990s, as big-box stores expanded from small and midsize towns into the suburbs of major U.S. cities, they have changed the face of retailing. By extension, their success cut away at the advertising revenues of newspaper companies.

    Coming out of the 1991 recession, big-box retailers such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Costco Wholesale Corp. accounted for about 16 percent of general merchandise sales nationwide; today the figure is nearly 50 percent. That jump in market share, Ginocchio said, is the main reason retail advertising growth at the nation's newspapers is expected to be less than half the 4 percent that the industry forecast at the beginning of 2004.

    Newspaper executives have known that some big-box retailers prefer television and radio advertising over print publications. But the Deutsche Bank study quantifies the trend, demonstrating that as those retailers have expanded, their spending preferences have had a big drag on retail advertising.

    Between 1993 and 1997, the study said, big-box retailers slowed retail advertising growth by one-half to 1 percentage point. Between 1998 and 2000, the figure reached 1.5 percent. Today, the drag is 2-2.5 percent.

    Ginocchio estimates that as big-box retailers continue to take 3-5 percent of market share away from traditional and discount department stores, they will drag down newspaper retail advertising by about 2 percent. Retail advertising accounted for 47 percent, or about $21 billion, of total advertising in 2003.

    "The correlation between Wal-Mart exposure and local advertising revenue growth over the last two to three years has been extraordinary," he added.

    Wal-Mart, said Deutsche Bank, spends 0.3 percent of its sales--$259 billion worldwide in 2003--on advertising and allocates 3 percent of that budget to newspapers. By comparison, traditional department stores spend 4.6 percent of their sales on advertising, and most significant, appropriate 85 percent of that to newspapers.

    Wal-Mart marketing director Troy Steiner said the retailer spends about $100 million a year on newspaper advertising, the bulk of which are inserts.

    "Wal-Mart is not reliant on advertising to drive its sales," he said. "We certainly see the value in all advertising media, but we do things based on what's effective."

    The chief executive of one of the country's largest media buyers said most advertisers would love not to have to spend money on advertising. "But their reality is much different than Wal-Mart's," said Scott Harding of Downers Grove-based Newspaper Services of America.

    Unlike the country's department stores, which largely began in big cities, Wal-Mart grew in rural areas far from metropolitan centers. As the company expanded, it discovered it could drive sales through television advertising and monthly inserts in local newspapers.

    "Wal-Mart created a brand and reputation that became larger than life," Harding said. "As they grew, advertising was judged to be an expense that didn't have to be as large as their competitors'."

    For newspaper companies with large numbers of Wal-Mart stores in their markets, the drag on retail advertising has been greatest. Media General Inc., a newspaper chain based in Richmond, Va., and E.W. Scripps Co., based in Cincinnati, have been most affected, said the report.

    Conversely, newspaper companies that predominantly operate in large cities, such as Tribune Co., owner of the Chicago Tribune, and The New York Times Co., have experienced less of a jolt.

    To compensate for big-box retailers, the newspaper industry has countered with a variety of programs aimed at small and medium-size companies. In addition, larger retailers and national advertisers have been targeted with campaigns that mix Internet and print advertising.

    "The newspaper community has been dealing with this for a number of years, especially the past three to four years," said Jim Conaghan of the Newspaper Association of America. "When a Wal-Mart comes into a market, the effect on local retail and local advertising is pretty apparent."`


    Copyright 2004, Chicago Tribune

  23. #23
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    Default Re: A Day without a Walmart mention is a day without...

    Miulang, one of the web's most convenient ways to get around the mandatory registrations at some websites is BugMeNot.com. If you run across a site that demands that you register, check BugMeNot to see if someone else has already registered a bogus username for that website, and use that bogus name instead of giving out your real name.

  24. #24

    Default Re: A Day without a Walmart mention is a day without...

    Quote Originally Posted by Glen Miyashiro
    Miulang, one of the web's most convenient ways to get around the mandatory registrations at some websites is BugMeNot.com. If you run across a site that demands that you register, check BugMeNot to see if someone else has already registered a bogus username for that website, and use that bogus name instead of giving out your real name.
    Ho! Tanks foa da tip, anden, Glen. Us guys gotta be sneaky, yeah, foa stay unda da advertiser's radar, yeah?

    Miulang

  25. #25

    Default Re: Wal-Mart War Room

    Oops! They've done it again! Your WalMart news for today.

    http://www.forbes.com/home_asia/feed...ap1557102.html

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