Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 90

Thread: Model rocketry

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    10,077

    Default Model rocketry

    One of things that I do as a hobby is build and fly model rockets. I will admit by building skills is not as good as my flying skill but my rockets do fly safely. It's been a long while since I have flown but I do have photos of some of the launches at the HawaiiStories Gallery. As well as some photos taken from the vantage point of a model rocket in flight.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    middle of da ocean
    Posts
    5,500

    Thumbs up Re: Model rocketry

    Hey those are pretty cool rockets and the photos taken from them are really neat too. Looks like a good hobby to have. My hobby lately has been geocaching. The finding of hidden treasure boxes while hiking or otherwise exploring. It's fun too.
    Life is either an adventure... or you're not doing it right!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oahu now part of the traffic problem in lower Puna
    Posts
    8,415

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Is Geocaching where a hiker leaves something behind for another hiker to find using known clues? I kinda read about that a few years ago in the papers.

    As for model rocketry, I remember back in the 60's when Kahala Mall was called the Waialae Shopping Center, Cyril's Cyclery sold Estes model rockets in their mall store. Then Pete's Modelcraft (where Jamba Juice is now) sold model rockets. Ahh those nichrome wires.

    So what's the biggest engines out there now? I remember class C and D engines and those puny A engines without the wadding for the chute. When I was a kid back in the late 60's one of my neighbors had the Saturn Five multi stage model rocket but he never launched it because there was no place big enough to handle a three stager without being blown into the ocean by the trades. I had an Estes Vanguard III single stage rocket that used a single class C engine.

    Those were fun days, I'm glad to see model rocketry is still alive and well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    10,077

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    The most powerful engine that Estes makes is the E9 engine. The first link in my original post has a video of a launch by an E9-4 engine on a model rocket called the Broadsword that is about 3 feet tall, 2.8 inches in diameter and weighs around 8-9 ounces. I am guessing for that launch it went some where between 500 to 600 feet.

    Another company called Aerotech makes engines in the G range for standard model rocketry, but also makes engines more powerful in the H to M range but they kind of cost an arm and a leg to buy as well as other forms to fill out, licenses to get.

    The Saturn V was never a multi stage rocket, it was a multi engine cluster but you could fly it as single engine D engine powered rocket instead of the 3 C engines firing off at the same time. A multi stage rocket is where one engine fires, then fires off another engine while dropping a stage behind.
    Last edited by helen; September 11th, 2005 at 01:44 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oahu now part of the traffic problem in lower Puna
    Posts
    8,415

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    wow I guess model rocket engines have evolved! And did you know it's almost 2am? I think we're the ony ones chatting here

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Windward Oahu
    Posts
    1,248

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Rockets were my thing in the early 70s as a kid. Pete's in Ala Moana and Kamehaheha SC were the pitstops for my mom. Whatever happened to that cool yellow Cox launchpad? I remember building them and being afraid to put the C engines in them for fear of losing them. I think the longest I had a rocket was 4 launches before I lost them.

    Haha I remember sending cash (bills and coins) to buy stuff mailorder from Estes and Centuri and still get my order.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    10,077

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    I did model rocketry during high school in the 1970's. Sort of let it go when I was in college, but I would look over the model rocket stuff at Pearlridge's Hobby Company whenever I was in the area.

    Got back in the hobby in 1994, been in the hobby since then but latey I haven't flown rockets as often as I did in 1994-1999.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oahu now part of the traffic problem in lower Puna
    Posts
    8,415

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    When I was a teenager back in the early 70's I launched a small C-engine model rocket from my front yard at 5123 Kilauea Avenue where I grew up in. My rocket failed to deploy the parachute and it came crashing down in my neighbor's locked backyard, then the wadding was expelled out of the rocket tube. From the other side of the wood fence I saw smoke billowing from his backyard as the sparks from the delay ignited some dead grass behind the fence gate.

    I scaled the fence and grabbed his garden hose and put it out, burying the burn't grass before my neighbors came home. After that I never launched another rocket again. Just not enough space in my neighborhood to do that kind of stuff.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Wow, this brings back memories. I remember being in a model rocket club during the early 70's, Honorocs. As I remember competition flying was down at Kapiolani Park, next to the old driving range. During windy days, it would still blow many of the rockets out to sea. Club meetings were often at the McCully Library.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Windward Oahu
    Posts
    1,248

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Hey anyone seen the movie October Sky? That was a cool rocket movie. Man I probably coulda woulda shoulda been a rocket scientist.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Tradewinds swiped the rockets I built when I was a kid in the '60s. I remember a Wac Corporal with a B3-7 engine sailing off toward Queen's Surf from Kapiolani Park, never to be seen again. At that point I wished there were something that would delay the parachute opening until a LOT later!

    Then in high school a small group of us actually went through the tedious process of figuring out how to make our own small engines. Was a real trick trying to make them work -- they'd either just burn up in place or explode.

    Finally figured it all out and got some small ones to actually fly. And none of us lost our fingers over it!

    Only one of our group ever became an aerospace engineer. The rest got into other things.

    I still check out the latest developments in model rockets just out of curiosity. Some have actually launched wireless remote videocameras which is pretty cool. And, of course, there's that long-time interest in model airplanes, too.

    When I "grew up" I actually learned to fly the real thing and logged a few hundred hours when it was barely affordable. Sure miss it all sometimes.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    10,077

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    A couple of years (has it been that long) ago I took some of my digital cameras and a Kodak APS camera to Magic Island and take some pictures with those cameras.

    The link to the gallery of photos is here, while a picture of the 5 cameras used is here. The two cameras from Aiptek were the ones that was placed on a model rocket. The photos taken from the model rocket and shown here are from the Pencam II camera. Haven't worked out the bugs with the Aiptek Mini Pencam.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Me and my son go rocket shooting just about every week at Halawa park.
    Sandy's is too ridiculous. Lost our first rocket we launched a few weeks ago.
    Is there any rocket clubs? I use to belong to one in 1970. i forgot the name.
    But the pres at the time was Michael Okuda who is a die hard trekkie fan who use to show up at lauches and meetings (Manoa Library) wearing a mustard Star Trek shirt like Capt. Kirk wore! He went on to even make weapon props for the ST movies and work on the sets. Shoot for the stars?

  14. #14

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by craigwatanabe
    wow I guess model rocket engines have evolved! And did you know it's almost 2am? I think we're the ony ones chatting here
    Craig - They always had the "D E F's" we just could not afford them! Maybe the "D's" $3.95 for 3 back in the 70's not they are $9.00! The "E & F's" were Centuri engines. Remember the one we lost at Waialae Iki Park? went into the golf course.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by speedtek
    Is there any rocket clubs? I use to belong to one in 1970. i forgot the name.
    But the pres at the time was Michael Okuda who is a die hard trekkie fan who use to show up at lauches and meetings (Manoa Library) wearing a mustard Star Trek shirt like Capt. Kirk wore! He went on to even make weapon props for the ST movies and work on the sets. Shoot for the stars?
    That club was the Honorocs! Meetings were also at the Moiliii library. The first time I saw the movie, "Dark Star" was at one of those meetings.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    10,077

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by speedtek
    They always had the "D E F's" we just could not afford them! Maybe the "D's" $3.95 for 3 back in the 70's not they are $9.00! The "E & F's" were Centuri engines. Remember the one we lost at Waialae Iki Park? went into the golf course.
    I think back in those days I could afford to buy those engines and the rockets if I saved enough money but the main problem for me was where to fly. I was losing Alpha's on A8-3 from my folks background, there was no way to fly a E engine rocket.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by Pretender
    That club was the Honorocs! Meetings were also at the Moiliii library. The first time I saw the movie, "Dark Star" was at one of those meetings.
    Ok whick guy were you? I was the biggest guy there. always carried my rockets in grocery bags and a large craftsman tool box. My rockets were the ugliest for the group. hehehe. I made a lot of home mades which were always going everywhere.

    My favorite rocket is the Cherokee-D, It had nine lives. Lost once in the iron wood tree (recovered 2 weeks later) and it went swimming in the ocean (recovered by surfers and lived to fly again). Gone now, mom threw it out. Now I have parts to build 10 of them. also have a BT-50 version.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Launch: Sunday Nov. 27, 2005, 1:00 PM
    Site: Halawa
    Rocket: CBR (Chinese Bottle Rocket)
    Wind: very little

    First Flight: 1/2A6-2
    Height: 200 Feet
    Notes: Recovered
    Problems: Single streamer came down too fast, smashed bodt tube.

    Second Flight: A6-4 Quest
    Height: 450 Feet
    Notes: Recovered
    Problems: Triple streamer came down good pole stuck in ground.

    Summary: Excellent straight flights for no fins. Easy to build.
    working on a bigger D-Engine one now! Only draw back it the wood stand
    gets a little burnt.
    The Chinese are too smart, no fins and it flys straight. Less cost.
    The German V's with fins were more dangerous.


    My son hooking it up.


    Must be getting old, reflexes getting slow.


    Recovery in the grass right side up. YEAH!

  19. #19

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by helen
    I think back in those days I could afford to buy those engines and the rockets if I saved enough money but the main problem for me was where to fly. I was losing Alpha's on A8-3 from my folks background, there was no way to fly a E engine rocket.
    We have been having good luck at Halawa. We recovered many rockets on C-6 engines. Parachute and Streamers. Lost only 2 on those engines because the shock cord broke/melted and the nose cones floated away.

    synopsis: when using bigger engines use more wadding? i had 4 sheets in there. I will be changing to Kevlar thread soon.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oahu now part of the traffic problem in lower Puna
    Posts
    8,415

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Aha! Okay Speedtek I'll keep your name a secret. Derek gave you away. I shoulda known

    Yeah I remember the one that went Makai at Waialae Iki park. That was a nice semi-metallic one. I remember saying: 10, 9,8,7,6,5,4 uhhh Gary time to get away from the launch pad! 3-2-1!

    Still waiting for Nero!

    Craig

  21. #21
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oahu now part of the traffic problem in lower Puna
    Posts
    8,415

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by speedtek
    Me and my son go rocket shooting just about every week at Halawa park.
    Sandy's is too ridiculous. Lost our first rocket we launched a few weeks ago.
    Is there any rocket clubs? I use to belong to one in 1970. i forgot the name.
    But the pres at the time was Michael Okuda who is a die hard trekkie fan who use to show up at lauches and meetings (Manoa Library) wearing a mustard Star Trek shirt like Capt. Kirk wore! He went on to even make weapon props for the ST movies and work on the sets. Shoot for the stars?
    Michael Okuda...boy that brings back memories. Not only is he a die-hard Trekkie that designed some of the props he also designed the set for the first Star Trek Movie... Remember? Look at the first series of Star Trek Movies starting with "The Movie" you'll see Michael Okuda's name on the credits.

    And the great part of it all is that he's a local boy! He used to work for Queen's Hospital when he got the contract to design the set.

    He told me once that on the Captain's chair they had to replace the leather with something that didn't squeak when someone sat there and on one of the armrests there is a sticker that says, "Warp 5 it not only saves lives...it's the law"

  22. #22

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by craigwatanabe
    Aha! Okay Speedtek I'll keep your name a secret. Derek gave you away. I shoulda known

    Yeah I remember the one that went Makai at Waialae Iki park. That was a nice semi-metallic one. I remember saying: 10, 9,8,7,6,5,4 uhhh Gary time to get away from the launch pad! 3-2-1!

    Still waiting for Nero!

    Craig
    It was called a Centuri "Quasar" same as my CB name....

  23. #23
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oahu now part of the traffic problem in lower Puna
    Posts
    8,415

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by speedtek
    It was called a Centuri "Quasar" same as my CB name....

    Yep catch ya on the flip side Quasar...this is KLO-9584 the Essex...we're 10-8 and 10-10 on the side.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    10,077

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Quote Originally Posted by craigwatanabe
    Michael Okuda...boy that brings back memories. Not only is he a die-hard Trekkie that designed some of the props he also designed the set for the first Star Trek Movie... Remember? Look at the first series of Star Trek Movies starting with "The Movie" you'll see Michael Okuda's name on the credits.
    He didn't start working until the 4th movie, but he did the text commentaries for the DVD versions.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Model rocketry

    Michael Okuda
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    Jump to: navigation, search
    Michael Okuda is an artist who is best known for his work on Star Trek.

    In the mid 1980s he designed the look of animated computer displays for the Enterprise-A bridge in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.

    This lead to a staff position on Star Trek: The Next Generation in 1987 as a scenic artist, adding detail to set designs and props. His most famous contribution to The Next Generation is the look of the fictional LCARS computer system used throughout the Enterprise-D and other Starfleet starships, a style that has come to be known among fans as "okudagrams".

    Michael also served as a technical consultant on Star Trek along with Rick Sternbach, advising the script-writers on the technology used throughout Star Trek, such as the transporters and the warp drive. This work resulted in a Technical Manual that was distributed to prospective script-writers along with the series bible. The manual was later published in revised and updated form as the Star Trek: The Next Generation: Technical Manual by Pocket Books. Michael then went on to write a number of Star Trek books with his wife Denise.

    Michael continued working at Paramount Studios on the Star Trek series that followed The Next Generation, until the cancellation of Star Trek: Enterprise in 2005. He also worked on the Star Trek movies that were produced while the television series were in production.

    Michael remains involved creatively with the Star Trek franchise and is currently an acting consultant for Perpetual Entertainment in their development of MMOG, Star Trek Online.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •