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Thread: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

  1. #1

    Default 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e. Hawaiian language analysis.

    I have started this thread with the intention that it be used for the analyisis of Hawaiian language. I have taken only two semesters of Hawaiian (Haw 101 and Haw 102) in college during the 2004-2005 school year, and I have spent the last year, off and on, studying the language on my own. Because I study it on my own, whenever I encounter something confusing in terms of grammar, I must rely on explanations in written materials: 1) The Hawaiian Dictionary by Elbert and Pūku'i, 2) Hawaiian Grammar, and 3) The online materials for Haw 452 which can be found at http://www.uatuahine.hawaii.edu/papa...5/default.html

    The written sources listed above have been a great deal of help, but I am still left with many questions. Right now, I am reading Ke Ka'ao o Lā'ieikawai, and there are some phrases that I found peculiar. I am going to post some of these sentences below with the parts I found confusing in orange letters, as the rest of the paragraph is included so that readers can judge the meaning of the phrases through context. Beneath the phrases, I will write down my opinions about the mechanics of the phrases, and I'd appreciate any help from members familiar with the Hawaiian language.


    1) " 'Auhea 'olua. E noho 'olua i ka hale nei. Na 'olua nā mea a pau o loko, 'a'ole kekahi mea e koe o ka hale nei iā 'olua. 'O 'olua ma loko a ma waho o kēia wahi."
    - For this phrase, I assumed that the subject ['olua] was placed at the beginning of the sentence for emphasis as an introductory clause being preceded by the nominative marker ['o]. However, the phrase "You two are on the inside and the outside of this place" does not satisfy me. I think that this is an idiom which I'm not familiar with, and I have not been able to find an explanation for it. Through context, it looks like it might mean that the subject ['olua] will have complete access to, or temporary ownership of, everything in the vicinity of the house.

    2) Ua makemake au i ke ali'i wahine, no ka mea, ke 'ike le'a nei au i ka 'oi loa o kona maika'i ma mua o ka'u mau wāhine mua nāna i kūmaka 'ia. Akā, ua lohe 'oe i ka'u ho'ohiki pa'a 'ana, 'a'ole au e lawe mai i kekahi wahine o kēia mau moku i wahine na'u."
    - In this phrase it looks like the author used an actor emphatic phrase to modify ka'u mau wāhine mua, but what I found awkward about this is that the verb in the actor emphatic phrase is passivised with 'ia. From what I've read, the verb in an actor emphatic sentence is usually a verb transitive. This sentence is an example of one of the exceptions. In another book, He Mo'olelo no Nawahiokalani'opu'u, I found an actor emphatic phrase with a verb intransitive. My problem now is to determine whether or not I can use such exceptions to this pattern when I write and speak Hawaiian.

    3) Ho'ohuli a'ela nā mea wa'a i ka wa'a i hope a holo i O'ahu nei. I ia manawa a ka wa'a e ho'i hope nei, ho'ohuoi ihola ka makāula i ka pā
    'ana a ka makani ma kona pāpālina, no ka mea, ua maopopo iā ia kahi a ka makani i pā ai i ka holo 'ana mai O'ahu aku nei.
    - Right now, I'm having trouble determining the function of nei in mai O'ahu aku nei. I think that it in combination with aku, forming aku nei, it may be a time reference meaning "a little while ago" but I'm having trouble understanding why the phrase would not then read "ka holo 'ana mai nei mai O'ahu aku," where the word nei would follow the directional after the verb, rather than the directional after the place name O'ahu. Could it be possible that the focus of time, "a little while ago," was placed after the place name O'ahu in order to emphasize O'ahu as a place where the characters had been recently, whereas the sentence I wrote may place the emphasis on the the action of sailing having occured recently?
    Last edited by 'i'iwipolena; June 20th, 2006 at 12:22 AM. Reason: I initially chose for words with emphasis to be written in blue, but the blue fonts appeared on the screen in a shade too dark for it to be easily distinguished from the rest of the text in black.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    If you translate this topic thread in English you might get more help

    Manoa

    I don't know too many posters here who speak Hawaiian...

    I myself have learned POW the hard way!

    I Pau!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Aloha e 'I'iwipolena! I have to confess, your questions of Hawaiian syntax fly far above my feeble mind, and probably more than a few moderately skilled students of Hawaiian, too! Hawaiian Language was my 'discipline of choice' for my college degree (a bit like a minor), and I got to the point where I could generally converse, but nowhere near the level of study you're at!

    Or at least, I've forgotten most of the technicals. I do have memories of debating placements of 'nei,' wrapping posessives with plurals with... okay, now my head hurts.

    Anyway, I know a few folks who are true students of Hawaiian, and hope some of them might have some answers for you. In the mean time, welcome to the 'Threads and I hope you find some other topics here worth discussing!

  4. #4

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    umm....I can translate it for you, but I cannot explain it linguistically in the same manner as you are asking.

  5. #5

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e. Hawaiian language analysis.

    Quote Originally Posted by 'i'iwipolena
    1) " 'Auhea 'olua. E noho 'olua i ka hale nei. Na 'olua n? mea a pau o loko, 'a'ole kekahi mea e koe o ka hale nei i? 'olua. 'O 'olua ma loko a ma waho o k?ia wahi."
    - For this phrase, I assumed that the subject ['olua] was placed at the beginning of the sentence for emphasis as an introductory clause being preceded by the nominative marker ['o]. However, the phrase "You two are on the inside and the outside of this place" does not satisfy me. I think that this is an idiom which I'm not familiar with, and I have not been able to find an explanation for it. Through context, it looks like it might mean that the subject ['olua] will have complete access to, or temporary ownership of, everything in the vicinity of the house.
    Hear ye you two. Please stay in this house. For you[r disposal] shall be everything inside, nothing of this house shall be kept from you. You are part and parcel of everything inside and outside of this place.

    The manner of this paragraph is quite poetic, emphasizing that no form of hospitality shall be spared.


    Quote Originally Posted by 'i'iwipolena
    2) Ua makemake au i ke ali'i wahine, no ka mea, ke 'ike le'a nei au i ka 'oi loa o kona maika'i ma mua o ka'u mau w?hine mua n?na i k?maka 'ia. Ak?, ua lohe 'oe i ka'u ho'ohiki pa'a 'ana, 'a'ole au e lawe mai i kekahi wahine o k?ia mau moku i wahine na'u."
    - In this phrase it looks like the author used an actor emphatic phrase to modify ka'u mau w?hine mua, but what I found awkward about this is that the verb in the actor emphatic phrase is passivised with 'ia. From what I've read, the verb in an actor emphatic sentence is usually a verb transitive. This sentence is an example of one of the exceptions. In another book, He Mo'olelo no Nawahiokalani'opu'u, I found an actor emphatic phrase with a verb intransitive. My problem now is to determine whether or not I can use such exceptions to this pattern when I write and speak Hawaiian.
    I had desired this chiefess, because, I saw for certain how superior her goodness was over my other previous wives that I had seen [that I had had]. However, if you had heard of my unbreakable vows, I cannot bring any woman of these specific districts/islands (moku means both, but I don't know the context) to become my wife.

    "n?na i (blank) 'ia" is a phrase emphasizing/clarifying that which was just spoken of.


    Quote Originally Posted by 'i'iwipolena
    3) Ho'ohuli a'ela n? mea wa'a i ka wa'a i hope a holo i O'ahu nei. I ia manawa a ka wa'a e ho'i hope nei, ho'ohuoi ihola ka mak?ula i ka p?
    'ana a ka makani ma kona p?p?lina, no ka mea, ua maopopo i? ia kahi a ka makani i p? ai i ka holo 'ana mai O'ahu aku nei.
    - Right now, I'm having trouble determining the function of nei in mai O'ahu aku nei. I think that it in combination with aku, forming aku nei, it may be a time reference meaning "a little while ago" but I'm having trouble understanding why the phrase would not then read "ka holo 'ana mai nei mai O'ahu aku," where the word nei would follow the directional after the verb, rather than the directional after the place name O'ahu. Could it be possible that the focus of time, "a little while ago," was placed after the place name O'ahu in order to emphasize O'ahu as a place where the characters had been recently, whereas the sentence I wrote may place the emphasis on the the action of sailing having occured recently?

    So then the wa'a crew turned the wa'a around and sailed for O'ahu. At that time that the wa'a was turning, a suspicious feeling overcame the prophet/seer as the wind wafted over his cheeks, because he knew from where the wind was blowing, as they sailed back towards O'ahu.

    aku nei in this instance reminds us that they were there. It sort of means "recently".

  6. #6

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Thank you Pzarquon and Mana'o Pua'i, for your replies.

    Through context, I can usually tell what is going on in the stories even if I'm not familiar with the patterns being used. The problem is that I am analysing these sentences in order to extract sentence patterns. I have some other sentences listed below here, with the parts I found strange typed in orange..

    1) E Ihuanu ē! Ke 'ike maopopo le'a aku nei wau 'ānō i kēia manawa 'a'ole e lanakila ana ko kākou 'ao'ao, a ma ku'u mana'opa'a ho'i, e lanakila ana ka malihini ma luna o kākou, no ka mea, ke 'ike maopopo akula nō 'oe ua make loa ko kākou kanaka i ka wēlau wale nō o ko ia ala lima. Ahona a ku'i maoli aku kēlā, lele li'ili'i.
    -This I could not understand at all.

    2) 'Auhea 'oe! Ua pau kā mākou 'ōlelo; 'a'ohe hana i koe. Kūlia i mua o ka 'ai a ke kumu a kākou i a'o pū 'ole 'ia mai ai iā mākou, a ke 'ōlelo mai nei ho'i 'oe ua kani ka pola a ko malo.
    - This sentence I found difficult because it begins with the word Kūlia, which has several meanings, so I couldn't determine which one was implied in the sentence. Could it be that the author used the word kū with it's passive suffix as an imperative?

    3) I noho aku auane'i kāua a i loa'a kā kāua keiki, a he keiki kāne, a laila, pōmaika'i kāua, ola nā iwi i loko o ko kāua mau lā 'elemakule a hā'ule aku i ka make, nalo nō ho'i nā wahi huna. Na ia keiki e na'i nā moku e pau ai ke loa'a ho'i iā kāua ke keiki mua, a he keiki kāne.
    - I had problems with the part of the sentence that says " e pau ai." I could only guess that it means all of the islands/districts, or it means "in order to/ so that" + whatever definition their using for the word pau in this scenario.

    4) Akā ho'i, inā he kaikamahine ke hānau mua mai, a laila, e make, a inā he mau kaikamāhine wale nō kā kāua ke hānau mai, e make nō. Aia nō ke ola a hānau mai a he keiki kāne, ola nā hānau muli inā he mau kaikamāhine."
    - I had problems extracting the sentence pattern from this part of the sentence. I could not tell if the aia in the beginning signaled some type of version of the idiom "aia a" (when), and if the "ke" in front of the word "ola" was the singular definite article or if it meant "when/if," or whether the pattern was not related to my thoughts written above.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Quote Originally Posted by 'i'iwipolena
    2) 'Auhea 'oe! Ua pau kā mākou 'ōlelo; 'a'ohe hana i koe. Kūlia i mua o ka 'ai a ke kumu a kākou i a'o pū 'ole 'ia mai ai iā mākou, a ke 'ōlelo mai nei ho'i 'oe ua kani ka pola a ko malo.
    - This sentence I found difficult because it begins with the word Kūlia, which has several meanings, so I couldn't determine which one was implied in the sentence. Could it be that the author used the word kū with it's passive suffix as an imperative?
    Kūlia is the imperative form of ku in the sentence above and is somewhat equivalent in meaning to the Japanese imperative "tomare" 「止まれ」. Since I'm feeling somewhat lazy at the moment, I'll leave the rough English translation to Pua'i.
    Ā Ē Ī Ō Ū ā ē ī ō ū -- Just a little something to "cut and paste."

  8. #8

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    1) E Ihuanu ?! Ke 'ike maopopo le'a aku nei wau '?n? i k?ia manawa 'a'ole e lanakila ana ko k?kou 'ao'ao, a ma ku'u mana'opa'a ho'i, e lanakila ana ka malihini ma luna o k?kou, no ka mea, ke 'ike maopopo akula n? 'oe ua make loa ko k?kou kanaka i ka w?lau wale n? o ko ia ala lima. Ahona a ku'i maoli aku k?l?, lele li'ili'i.
    -This I could not understand at all.

    O Ihuanu! I just realized at this moment that our side isn't going to win, and I am certain that the foreigners are going to best us, because you see for yourself that our people died upon (as a result of) the spear in his hand. It is better to be struck hard that way, [because we are] the lesser foe.

    this last sentence is quite poetic, more as a dirge that death is emminent.

    2) 'Auhea 'oe! Ua pau k? m?kou '?lelo; 'a'ohe hana i koe. K?lia i mua o ka 'ai a ke kumu a k?kou i a'o p? 'ole 'ia mai ai i? m?kou, a ke '?lelo mai nei ho'i 'oe ua kani ka pola a ko malo.
    - This sentence I found difficult because it begins with the word K?lia, which has several meanings, so I couldn't determine which one was implied in the sentence. Could it be that the author used the word k? with it's passive suffix as an imperative?

    Alas! We are done speaking; there is nothing left to be done. We have stoodfast in the face of the very reasons that we all failed to learn from, because you are here saying that we face a mighty warrior.

    kani ke pola o ka malo is an olelo noeau that boasts of an athlete so badass that the sound of his running makes his malo snap in the wind.

    3) I noho aku auane'i k?ua a i loa'a k? k?ua keiki, a he keiki k?ne, a laila, p?maika'i k?ua, ola n? iwi i loko o ko k?ua mau l? 'elemakule a h?'ule aku i ka make, nalo n? ho'i n? wahi huna. Na ia keiki e na'i n? moku e pau ai ke loa'a ho'i i? k?ua ke keiki mua, a he keiki k?ne.
    - I had problems with the part of the sentence that says " e pau ai." I could only guess that it means all of the islands/districts, or it means "in order to/ so that" + whatever definition their using for the word pau in this scenario.

    We have lived here and had our child, a son, and we were blessed, our bones have had life until our elderly days when we fall into death, and the hidden ways are forgotten. That child shall conquer the islands for the reason that we had this first child, a son.

    4) Ak? ho'i, in? he kaikamahine ke h?nau mua mai, a laila, e make, a in? he mau kaikam?hine wale n? k? k?ua ke h?nau mai, e make n?. Aia n? ke ola a h?nau mai a he keiki k?ne, ola n? h?nau muli in? he mau kaikam?hine."
    - I had problems extracting the sentence pattern from this part of the sentence. I could not tell if the aia in the beginning signaled some type of version of the idiom "aia a" (when), and if the "ke" in front of the word "ola" was the singular definite article or if it meant "when/if," or whether the pattern was not related to my thoughts written above.

    Howevah, if it is a girl who is our first born, and then she dies, and if it is only daughters we birth, death is the only result. Life will be restricted until the birth of a son, and subsequently then daughters will live.

    no laila e 'I'iwi e, e noi ana oe iau e unuhi i ka moolelo holookoa?

  9. #9

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Aloha mai kaua, e Pua'i Mana'o.

    Mahalo no ho'i ia 'oe, e ku'u hoa, no kau mau pane 'ana mai. 'A'ole no wau e nonoi aku nei ia 'oe e mahele 'olelo mai i neia ka'ao 'oko'a, 'oiai, ma o ka'u pane 'ana aku ia 'oe ma keia alelo a ko kaua po'e kupuna, maopopo no paha ia 'oe he 'olelo Hawai'i au. 'O na pepeke a'u i kahiauli iho ai ma ke kikokikona 'alani, 'o ia wale no ko'u e mamake e wehewehe iki 'ia mai ke 'ano o ka pilina 'oleo e kahi mau hoa aku i makau i ia 'olelo, e like ho'i me 'oe. Aia na'e, ina no paha 'oe i heluhelu iho i ka'u i kakau iho ai ma luna a'e nei no ia mau mea, ina no paha ua maopopo akaka mua ku'u mana'o ia 'oe; aka ho'i, no'u no paha ka hewa, no ka mea, ma muli o kau i ninau mai nei me keia "e noi ana oe iau e unuhi i ka moolelo holookoa," kohu mea la, 'a'ole i lawa kupono ko'u ho'akaka mua 'ana no ke kumu o ko'u ho'omaka 'ana i keia 'olelo kukakuka, 'o ia ho'i, i kala'e ai na mamala 'olelo o ua mo'olelo nei i akaka 'ole kona 'ano. A no ku'u hewa ia 'oe, e Pua'i Mana'o, ke nonoi aku nei wau i ko 'olu'olu e kala iki mai i keia wahi haumana 'olelo Hawai'i 'akahi akahi nei.

    Ke huli ho'i kou mau maka a 'alawa i na la'ana a'u i lawe mai ai mai ka mo'olelo no ua 'o La'ieikawai, ma lalo o na puana'i e 'ike 'ia ai ka'u mau wahi kuhiakau, 'o ia ho'i na 'olelo kokua, pili i ke kumu o ka ka mea kakau mo'olelo ho'ohana 'ana i na 'ikeoma i ho'ohana 'ia a me ke kumu o kona ho'oka'ina 'ana i na hua'olelo o ia mau pepeke ma ka huipa'a i ho'onohonoho mua 'ia ai.

    Ua heluhelu iho nei wau i kau unuhi 'olelo 'ana i na puana'i a'u waiho ai na 'oukou, na ka po'e mikololohua o ka 'olelo 'oiwi makamae o ko kaua one hanau e like me 'oe, a no laila, ke makemake nei wau e kama'ilio iki aku e pili ana no na wahi i 'oko'a ai ka'u hana mahele 'olelo mai kau.

    Ke 'ike maopopo le'a aku nei wau '?n? i k?ia manawa 'a'ole e lanakila ana ko k?kou 'ao'ao, a ma ku'u mana'opa'a ho'i, e lanakila ana ka malihini ma luna o k?kou, no ka mea, ke 'ike maopopo akula n? 'oe ua make loa ko k?kou kanaka i ka w?lau wale n? o ko ia ala lima
    I kau unuhina i ka polopolema mua o ka'u mau la'ana mamala 'olelo i waiho ai na 'oukou i nehinei, wahi āu "you see for yourself that our people died upon (as a result of) the spear in his hand." I ka'u unuhi 'ana i hana iho ai, 'o ka hua'olelo "welau," he welelau no ia, a i 'ole ia, he 'elau (tip), no laila, penei ka'u "You see clearly that our man died upon (as a result, e like me kau i kakau iho ai) the mere tip of his blow (hand)." Aka, 'o ka mea hoihoi loa a kupaianaha 'i'o no ho'i, ma ka mo'olelo no La'ieikawai, ho'ohalikelike no ka mea kakau i ko 'Aiwohikupu (kela kanaka i make iho ai ua kane mokomoko la) mau lima i ka pololu, 'o ia ho'i kekahi ihe lo'ihi (long spear), me ka 'i aku "Ua like ka pu'upu'u o keia kanaka me ka pololu." Eia na'e, 'a'ole maopopo pono ia'u pehea la i loa'a ai ia 'ike no'eau ia 'oe ke 'ole 'oe i heluhelu mua i keia mo'olelo nei ma mua aku nei. No keia mea, ke pahola aku nei wau i ka ho'omaika'i ia 'oe no kau pane lehia 'ana mai me ka 'olelo aku, 'e, ua ho'okahaha maoli 'oe ia'u no kela 'ike i loa'a ia 'oe.

    K?lia i mua o ka 'ai a ke kumu a k?kou i a'o p? 'ole 'ia mai ai i? m?kou, a ke '?lelo mai nei ho'i 'oe ua kani ka pola a ko malo
    I ka lua o na polopolema wahi a kau unuhina "We have stoodfast in the face of the very reasons that we all failed to learn from, because you are here saying that we face a mighty warrior." Aka, 'oiai he 'ano pohihihi ua mamala 'olelo la ia'u nei, ke mana'opa'a nei wau, ua ho'ohana 'ia ka hua'olelo "kulia" ma ke 'ano he kena; a no ka hua'olelo " 'ai," he 'olelo ma'amau no ia no na "strikes/holds" no loko mai o ka 'oihana ku'ialua; a 'o ka hua 'olelo "kumu" au i unuhi 'olelo ai he "reason," 'o "teacher" ka unuhina pololei ma lalo o keia mau 'ano, no ka mea, 'o keia kumu nei no ke kumu a'o 'oihana pepehi kanaka nana 'o Ihuanu i ho'oma'ama'a i ka hana ku'iku'i. ('O Ihuanu ka inoa o ke kanaka paonioni i make akula ia 'Aiwohikupua).

    I noho aku auane'i k?ua a i loa'a k? k?ua keiki, a he keiki k?ne, a laila, p?maika'i k?ua, ola n? iwi i loko o ko k?ua mau l? 'elemakule a h?'ule aku i ka make, nalo n? ho'i n? wahi huna
    I ke kolu o na polopolema, ua kikokiko a'e 'oe "We have lived here and had our child, a son, and we were blessed, our bones have had life until our elderly days when we fall into death, and the hidden ways are forgotten." Eia na'e, me neia ka'u unuhi 'olelo 'ana "If we live together henceforth and have a child, and he is a boy, then, we will be blessed. Our bones will live until old age, and when we die, the place where our bones will be hidden will be concealed (or our private parts will be hidden)." 'O ia ho'i, e malama maika'i 'ia ana no ko laua kino ia laua e ola ana, a i ka wa e make ai, e hunakele 'ia ana ko laua la mau iwi 'ihi kapu i 'ole ai e lilo ia ha'i a ho'oma'ino'ino 'ia.

    E ku'u hoa Pua'i Mana'o e, he lolo 'ailolo a mana'o akamai loea maoli 'i'o no ia e noho ulukau 'ia ana ma loko o ko puniu, 'oiai, 'o 'oe no ka 'oi ma mua o na kanaka 'olelo Hawai'i a pau a'u i 'ike a launa pu aku ai i loko o keia mau makahiki pokole o ko'u ola 'ana. A no laila la, ke ha'i mua aku nei wau ia 'oe, makahehi loa 'ia no ho'i 'oe e keia wahi kane 'opiopio nei nana e ho'omoe nei keia leka i mua ou a me na kanaka a pau ma ka punaewele puni honua me ke aloha pumehana, a me ka mana'olana ho'i he mea hiki ia kaua ke ho'omau i ka kaua kama'ilio 'ana i keia 'olelo nahenahe nei a kaua, 'oiai, wahi a kahiko "I ka 'olelo no ke ola, i ka 'olelo no ka make;" a ma o ka pulama ho'omau i keia 'olelo e ola mau loa ai ka hana loea a me ka 'ike kuhohonu o ko kaua mau kupuna 'oiwi, na lakou e ho'ohui keia hanauna kanaka maoli nei o kaua me na hanauna Hawai'i kahiko o ka wa ma mua. 'E'ole ka 'ike kupuna, pono ai kakou Hawai'i. ('O ia ho'i, ina 'a'ole ka 'ike kupuna, 'a'ole pono kakou, na Hawai'i).

    Ua 'ano pulale aku nei wau i ke kikokiko 'ana a'e i ke kino nui o keia, a ma hope koke iho no o ka'u kaomi 'ana i ke pihi "enter," aia ho'i, 'ike a'e nei wau he mau pa'i hewa, a ua ho'oponopono koke 'ia no. Aka, aia no paha kekahi mau pa'i hewa 'e aku e koe nei, a no ia mea, ke 'olu'olu 'oe, e kala mai ia'u ke 'ike 'ia kekahi o ua mau pa'i hewa la. Pono au e ha'alele, aka, he ho'i mai koe.

    Me ke aloha ho'omau,
    I'iwipolena
    Last edited by 'i'iwipolena; June 22nd, 2006 at 01:26 AM.

  10. #10

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Oiaio no he hookahi wale makahiki au i kula ai ma ka olelo? O ke ano o ka pilinaolelo au e kakau ai he hoailona o ka hoopaa mua ia o na pilina okoa ma o loa o ka pae haahaa i hookahua ia ma ka makahiki mua.

    ho ka nani a piha no au i ka hauoli ke heluhelu i kau leka; ahuwale ka naau aloha. He Hawaii kena ano.

    Eia kekahi, a pili keia manao i kau i hoakaka i luna ae nei. Aole au i heluhelu me ka maiau i kau e nonoi ana no ia mahele olelo ma o ka haole. A pili hoi i ke ano o ka'u e mahele olelo ana: kalele au ma luna o ka manao ma mua o ka pilinaolelo, na olelo pokole, a pela wale iho. Ma muli paha o keia a'u i hele ai a au; aohe ou ka hewa.

    Eia kekahi, o ko'u manao i pili ka pauku mua; i ka heluhelu ana i ia pauku, ike au aole pili i ka welau ponoi, pili hoi i ka pau ana o ia mau kanaka i ia kanaka nona ka lanakila. Iau, pili i ke kaua, aole pili i ka hakaka hookahi. He poeko a ahuwale kena ma ka pilinaolelo hope loa, me he kaumaha la i ka ike lea o ia hopena ehaeha.

    Eia kekahi, a he oiaio keia: aole paha au pololei i keia hana unuhina. Penei au e unuhi ai: heluhelu i ka pauku holookoa. Heluhelu a moakaka iau. A laila e heluhelu hou au i na pokepoke, me ke kalele ma luna o ke kaina o kela me keia kumuhana e hoakaka ia ana.

    Me keia hoi au e mahalo nui nei ia oe i ka hapai ana mai i keia kumuhana kupaianaha ma luna o keia kahua punaewele. Hauoli no hoi au.

    o au no
    na Pua'i

  11. #11
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    You get the feeling like you shoulda taken better notes in Hawaiian class in high school after reading that exchange?

  12. #12

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    what makes this exchange special to me isn't merely that 'I'iwi and I are discussing the story of Laieikawai, but that we are able to exchange ideas and conversation through Hawaiian. The olelo is such a beautiful tongue to use for any topic imaginable. And supporting 'I'iwi to speak Hawaiian is also supporting my own use. Beautiful.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pua'i Mana'o
    what makes this exchange special to me isn't merely that 'I'iwi and I are discussing the story of Laieikawai, but that we are able to exchange ideas and conversation through Hawaiian. The olelo is such a beautiful tongue to use for any topic imaginable. And supporting 'I'iwi to speak Hawaiian is also supporting my own use. Beautiful.
    Too bad there isn't a spell check for Hawaiian that'll put the punctuation marks where they need to be and let you know if your syntax is correct. Now that would be a great program!

  14. #14
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Although I don't speak Hawaiian, I am always happy to hear it. If I can't hear people speaking Hawaiian in Hawaiʻi, then where can I?

    The other day I was in CompUSA looking at the cameras, and a couple of ladies came in and started browsing next to me. One of them was admiring the lens size of one camera. "Oh, nui!" she commented, tracing her finger along the lens casing. Then she pulled out her phone and called someone to discuss, in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, which camera she should buy -- or at least, that's what I think the conversation was about, judging from the occasional words I could catch, like "Fuji", "Canon", "Sony", "Compact Flash", and "six megapixels".

  15. #15
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Quote Originally Posted by craigwatanabe
    Too bad there isn't a spell check for Hawaiian that'll put the punctuation marks where they need to be and let you know if your syntax is correct. Now that would be a great program!
    I dunno about syntax checkers, but the online Hawaiian Dictionaries at Ulukau: The Hawaiian Electronic Library are excellent. You can type in a word without accents and get the correctly accented version.

  16. #16

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Quote Originally Posted by Glen Miyashiro
    Although I don't speak Hawaiian, I am always happy to hear it. If I can't hear people speaking Hawaiian in Hawai?i, then where can I?

    The other day I was in CompUSA looking at the cameras, and a couple of ladies came in and started browsing next to me. One of them was admiring the lens size of one camera. "Oh, nui!" she commented, tracing her finger along the lens casing. Then she pulled out her phone and called someone to discuss, in ??lelo Hawai?i, which camera she should buy -- or at least, that's what I think the conversation was about, judging from the occasional words I could catch, like "Fuji", "Canon", "Sony", "Compact Flash", and "six megapixels".
    What I find the most challenging is to NOT maha'oi myself when surrounded by those who olelo, but aren't speaking to me. Just because I could communicate with them doesn't give me the right to eavesdrop onto their business. {pssst, but it is so haaaarrd not to }

  17. #17
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pua'i Mana'o
    What I find the most challenging is to NOT maha'oi myself when surrounded by those who olelo, but aren't speaking to me. Just because I could communicate with them doesn't give me the right to eavesdrop onto their business. {pssst, but it is so haaaarrd not to }
    I know what you're saying...whenever I hear it, my ears perk up and I automatically listen in even though they are not talking to me!

    What is funny is that several times I've caught people talking about me, not realizing maopopo ia'u. Especially once it was two guys asking each other if 'o ia kou makemake?, while nodding towards me, and I kinda had to giggle about it to know that here they were, trying to be discreet me ka wala'au ma ka 'olelo Hawai'i ... in front of a kumu kaiapuni ua mino'aka wale no au ia laua a ma ka ha'alele 'ana, ua ha'i au ia laua 'a'ole paha au kou makemake, aka mahalo nui i ko 'olua kokua 'ana mai ia'u a i ka ho'omau 'ana i ka 'olelo hawai'i... a pu'iwa no ko laua maka! heehee.

    Now I know I have to be careful of what I'm saying with my hoa kumu when out because more and more people understand and probably perk up and listen in as well even so, hu a'ela no ke aloha i loko o'u ke lohe i ka 'olelo hawai'i ma ka hale ku'ai, ma kahakai, ma ka hale ho'ike ki'i'oni'oni...kulu wale na waimaka.

    No laila mahalo ia 'olua no keia "kama'ilio" ma ka 'olelo Hawai'i, a e huikala mai no ho'i i ka'u hana maha'oi, ka ho'olohelohe 'ana i ko 'olua kama'ilio! heehee. no laila, i keia manawa, e ho'i ana au i na aka ...

  18. #18

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    aue ka hoomakeaka e!

    Aia au he haumana olelo no 15+ makahiki, e kakoo ana i ka'u mau keiki mai ko lakou wa kula kamalii. Ma loko o keia wa loihi, hoomaopopo no au i ka manawa a'u i kamaaina i na alo a pau o kela me keia kanaka i wali ka olelo...aka, ua pau kela manawa a ua hiki mai ka wa ma o loa. I keia manawa, aole hiki ke wanana 'na wai kela keiki e olelo ana?' A ina hiki ke lohe 'ia ka olelo, me ke kamaaina ole i ia kanaka, a me kona makua, hu ke nui a'e nei kakou ka puulu olelo hawaii!

    nani!

    aloha, P

  19. #19

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    heheheheh. This kinda reminds me of an incident at Ooka Supermarket on Maui. For years and years, the clerks there were mostly of Japanese ancestry. Then in the last 15 years or so, as those ladies retired, the clerks ended up being mostly Filipino. A bunch of customers (mostly older local people) once complained to the owner, Byron, that they didn't like the fact that the clerks were only speaking in Tagalog to each other. I guess they resented the fact that they didn't know what they were saying...probably thought the clerks were talking stink about them behind their backs. So Byron had to go tell the clerks to only speak English when they were at their cash registers...

    Carry on, though, I love the sound of mo'olelo, even though I only can pick out a few words here and there...

    Miulang

  20. #20
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    I think this is great. If there isn't a whole message board devoted to conversing in the Hawaiian language, there should be. I'm glad to have a little `olelo Hawaii here, in the mean time, and hope to see more.

    Heck, I'd support an area here to practice, study, and converse in Hawaiian. In fact, the software that runs this site can support language sets, so conceivably one could toggle it to see the entire interface in Hawaiian.

  21. #21

    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Aloha kakou a pau,

    Aue, he piha ko'u na'au i ka 'oli'oli no ka 'ike 'ana i keia 'akoakoa lehulehu 'ana o na kanaka o kela 'ano keia 'ano i ho'ohui 'ia no ko lakou hoihoi like i keia mea waiwai lua 'ole, 'o ka 'olelo Hawai'i. Eia hou ho'i, 'o ko 'oukou mau pane 'ana mai a me ko 'oukou 'olelo kuka'i 'ana kekahi i kekahi, he ho'ailona pomaika'i no ia no ka ikaika o ko 'oukou 'i'ini nui e ho'oma'ike'ike ia 'oukou iho ma na 'ano a pau ma o ia 'olelo makamae o kakou.

    'Apopo, a i 'ole i ka la 'apopo a ia la aku, e ho'a'o ana wau e lawe hou mai i kekahi mau la'ana pauku mai ka mo'olelo o La'ieikawai, a e paleo paha kakou e pili ana no ia mau pauku. Aka, ina 'oukou makemake, hiki ke lawe 'ia mai kekahi mau mea hou aku, me ke koina na'e e kakau 'ia ma ka 'olelo Hawai'i.

    Ina no paha 'a'ole wau ho'i mai i keia kahua punaewele i ka la 'apopo, a laila, e ho'opa'aha'awina ana no paha i "te reo Maori," no ka mea, 'o ia no kekahi o na 'olelo a'u e ho'a'o nei e a'o mai. Ina he hoihoi ko kekahi o 'oukou i ke a'o mai i te reo Maori, hiki ke hahai aku i keia loulou ma'ane'i http://home.unilang.org/main/forum/viewforum.php?f=39&sid=f1bb5cd1e5a9889252d8fd9e9c6 64be8. Ma ka wahi nona ia loulou, aia kekahi "kaiako," ka hua'olelo Maori no "kumu a'o," nana e ho'olako manuahi nei i kekahi mo'oha'awina reo Maori, a ua noa i ka lehulehu. Aka, no ke kawala o na kanaka, 'o wau wale no ka haumana nana e a'o nei i ia 'olelo ma kela kahua punaewele a puni. Kalele wau i ke ko'iko'i ma luna o ka 'olelo Hawai'i, aia na'e, he mea kokua i kekahi manawa ke ku'upau 'ana i ka 'a'apo mai i na 'olelo 'e a'e i pili i keia 'olelo.

    E Malia, ka mea nana i kikokiko i keia "e huikala mai no ho'i i ka'u hana maha'oi, ka ho'olohelohe 'ana i ko 'olua kama'ilio! heehee. no laila, i keia manawa, e ho'i ana au i na aka." Mai hopohopo no kou komo 'ana i loko o keia 'olelo kuka'i, 'oiai, 'o ia ka mea i ho'omaka 'ia ai keia. Ke paipai nei wau ia 'oe e ho'i mai e like me kou makemake a ho'ike i kou mana'o no na mea e kukakuka 'ia ana e na lala, a e ka'ana like paha i kekahi mau kumuhana 'e aku āu e mana'o ai he pono.

    A hui hou aku no, e o'u makamaka o neia kahua punaewele.

    Me ka ha'aha'a mau no,
    na 'I'iwi
    Last edited by 'i'iwipolena; June 24th, 2006 at 03:09 AM.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    I agree w/ PZ about the Hawaiian postings...

    I just wish I could understand what the heck they saying!

    For what it is worth to this discussion board...

    There is a conference going on at Kam School this weekend entitled:

    `Aha Kane: Native Hawaiian Men's Health Conference.

    My father-in-law was flown in from the Big Island to speak today....(in english as he is still learning Hawaiian himself although he is Hawaiian)

    "Ina pa`a `ole ka pohaku kihi, haule ka paia"

    If the corner stone is not set properly, the wall shall collapse

  23. #23
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Quote Originally Posted by manoasurfer123
    There is a conference going on at Kam School this weekend entitled: `Aha Kane: Native Hawaiian Men's Health Conference.
    Kam School? Where's that? The United Kingdom? Seriously... of all threads to use that oft-protested shorthand reference... but it's cool your dad is participating.

    Anyway. Carry on. Er, I mean... e wala'au hou `oukou, ke `oluolu.

    (Eh, what happened to the cool Kam School parody site?)

  24. #24
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Quote Originally Posted by pzarquon
    (Eh, what happened to the cool Kam School parody site?)
    Beverly Harbin threatened to sue?
    .
    .

    That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: 'Auhea 'oukou e na 'olelo Hawai'i e.

    Quote Originally Posted by pzarquon
    Kam School? Where's that? The United Kingdom? Seriously... of all threads to use that oft-protested shorthand reference... but it's cool your dad is participating.

    Anyway. Carry on. Er, I mean... e wala'au hou `oukou, ke `oluolu.

    (Eh, what happened to the cool Kam School parody site?)
    Not my dad... my father-in-law...

    For all I know... MY Dad could have gone to Kam school in the United Kingdom

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