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Thread: Sugar-free school

  1. #1

    Default Sugar-free school

    Did anyone see this story from ABC last night?
    • A principal took some action, and within a year not only had many students lost weight, but:

      visits to the school nurse were down 30 percent
      disciplinary problems dropped 20 percent.
      And test scores improved 10 percent to 15 percent.


    All that from changing soda machine content to water and modifying the cafeteria meals.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Maui
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: Sugar-free school

    Quote Originally Posted by Linkmeister
    Did anyone see this story from ABC last night?
    • A principal took some action, and within a year not only had many students lost weight, but:

      visits to the school nurse were down 30 percent
      disciplinary problems dropped 20 percent.
      And test scores improved 10 percent to 15 percent.


    All that from changing soda machine content to water and modifying the cafeteria meals.
    And the kid's here in Hawaii have no excuse for a poor diet since they have such excellent examples for them to follow.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Sugar-free school

    Excellent concept. If it works we should try it. I think the kids nowadays can benefit from a school that teaches healthy eating. Also, I think more physical activities and less homework so kids can do more chores around the house. I know...wishful thinking.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Sugar-free school

    I think it's a great move on the part of the schools to reduce the junk foods/soda availability at the cafeterias/canteens. They should really try to make it so that there is more wholesome foods available for the kids. Afterall, they are still growing etc etc, it'd be a shame if they were deprived good food because they were just at schools. I'm sure it'll also reduce all the acne problems.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Sugar-free school

    As long as they're not using aspartame haha.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Hilo, Hawai'i
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Sugar-free school

    we have a program we're trying at our hawaiian lab/charter schools, emphasising a healthy, traditional hawaiian diet... not just eating, but preparation too.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oahu
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Sugar-free school

    I supervise lunch hour 3 days a week at the grade school I teach in.
    The kids who act up the most in the classroom and on the playground, and who get in trouble with the teachers are the kids who I see eating pre-packaged and processed lunches loaded with sugar, salt and preservatives. It is no coincidence that the children who are eating a lunch with fresh fruits and vegetables, handmade sandwiches, and water or juice instead of soft drinks are the children who are better able to concentrate on their work, have less behaviour problems and overall seem more content.
    I'm all for school teachers helping to change the diet of the children in their school, and I think the first step is to begin the cross-over to a healthier diet for themselves and their families. The benefits for society are endless.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Oahu now part of the traffic problem in lower Puna
    Posts
    8,415

    Default Re: Sugar-free school

    I think the problem lies once again with the parents. Being a parent of six boys I understand how family habits can migrate into school habits when it comes to eating. When you eat a high fat/sugar diet at home, you will probably crave a similar diet at school. When it comes to Title 1 families (families that qualify as being at or below the federal poverty level) they typically don't have the education to eat nutritiously so their daily diets consists of fast foods and heavy snacks. I've seen a greater number of obese Title 1 families. They also have a higher incidence of other chronic diseases such as Diabetes, Heart Disease, and occular diseases.

    One eye opener was what I've seen with the BOE and the Headstart program that my wife is a Site manager of. Students that are part of the Headstart program that are integrated with a DOE public school cannot drink chocolate milk although regular DOE students can. So when there is a mix of Headstart and regular school students, there is this descrimination where certain kids can only drink white milk. These are mandates from the federal level stipulated on Headstart children.

    Good nutrition for our public school students start at the home. Some parents push that value onto the public school system. These parents look at public school as their free babysitter for the day and don't consider proper parenting skills as their job but the school's. As a board member of public schools from the best to the most economically deprived, I can see the difference parents make in their children's performance in school.

    The Charter school I'm currently a board member on now here on the Big Island mandates all of our students to eat a solid breakfast before school. Since 90% of our students come from Title 1 families (rural Puna) these children come to school without eating breakfast. Breakfast is THE most important meal of the day fueling the mind before academics, and these children go without.

    Because of their Title 1 entitlement of free or reduced cost for school lunches, they are also entitled to a free or reduced breakfast provided by DOE funding. Many of our students take advantage of this free meal and that is an inticement for them to come to school, for the food.

    I've heard of parents who's lame excuse not to drive their kids to the bus stop because they were too tired to haul their kids there. Because of that they not only miss school but also miss two meals during the day, breakfast and lunch. Pretty soon they develop a pattern of absenteeism and malnutrition. All of this leads to juvenile deliquency and takes them down a dangerous path.

    I've found being a board member for a school of deprived children here in Puna more challenging and rewarding than being a board member of one of the state's best Elementary Public schools in Honolulu (in which I've been a board member of as well). Nutrition is key to proper brain function and development. The charter school I'm a board member on now focuses on that by supplying needy students with the breakfast they need to get that jumpstart every school day because the parents failed to do their part.
    Last edited by craigwatanabe; October 31st, 2004 at 12:23 PM.

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