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View Full Version : Who actually owns a waterbed?



Mike_Lowery
February 22nd, 2008, 10:07 PM
I haven't seen/been on one since 1987-ish. That was some straight up 70s-80s steez. Do those things have any practical purpose?

cynsaligia
February 23rd, 2008, 06:49 AM
my effwad ex had an h2o bed. it took a lil getting used to in terms of sleeping on it. if it was a cool night & the bed's heater hadn't been turned on before bedtime, it was not so great [imagine sleeping on cold h2o]. non-sleeping bed activities were [adversely] affected by wave motion and comparative lack of support/bounceback.

joshuatree
February 23rd, 2008, 08:34 AM
my effwad ex had an h2o bed. it took a lil getting used to in terms of sleeping on it. if it was a cool night & the bed's heater hadn't been turned on before bedtime, it was not so great [imagine sleeping on cold h2o]. non-sleeping bed activities were [adversely] affected by wave motion and comparative lack of support/bounceback.

Non-sleeping bed activities? You mean like jumping up and down on the bed? :p

oceanpacific
February 23rd, 2008, 08:45 AM
Got rid of mine over three decades ago. Bought it from STONE FREE more or less as a novelty purchase.

A friend of mine had a "hybrid" design - a solid outer frame surrounding water "cylinders." That design contributed to more normal NON-SLEEPING activities - no risk of getting "sea-sick!" :D :D :D

Pomai
February 23rd, 2008, 09:02 AM
I had one a long time ago, which I slept on for about 6 months. The bare bones basic: one big bag of water held in place by a fancy-looking wood frame surrounding and containing the water matress. No heaters or any special covers or liners. It was kinda' like sleeping on a boat moored to the pier by a bungee cord. Sucked. I eventually got rid of it. That rolling motion hardly enhanced any "non-sleep" activities, actually making it more of a challenge to, ehem, "move around". lol

My friend had a Somma - the type that uses water tubes (think it was 6) - encased as part of a bed "system". He loved it.

Leo Lakio
February 23rd, 2008, 09:53 AM
Still sleeping on one these days; had one since the late '70s. The current one was in storage for a couple years, but the AF did not want to get rid of it, so we set it up 11 years ago when we had a large enough bedroom. We're very happy with it.
No heatersThat's crazy - the water will suck the heat right out of your body, garans. You can get sick that way.

Frankie's Market
February 23rd, 2008, 10:13 AM
I haven't seen/been on one since 1987-ish. That was some straight up 70s-80s steez. Do those things have any practical purpose?

The thinking goes that waterbeds have the advantage of contouring to your body, which relaxes your muscles and makes your sleep a more restful one. Also, because you can heat a waterbed, it feels more comfortable in cold weather than a conventional mattress.

BTW, while waterbeds have largely disappeared from bricks-and-mortar stores in recent years, you can still find them for sale online.

Pomai
February 23rd, 2008, 10:16 AM
Still sleeping on one these days; had one since the late '70s. The current one was in storage for a couple years, but the AF did not want to get rid of it, so we set it up 11 years ago when we had a large enough bedroom. We're very happy with it.That's crazy - the water will suck the heat right out of your body, garans. You can get sick that way.Remember, we're in Hawaii where average high temperatures are in the 80's and 90's during the day and lows in the 60's and 70's at night. ;)

If my bed requires electricity, that's way too high maintenance. Then you have the issue of the quality of the water in it. Forget it.

What if you filled a water bed with chocolate? Would that be a sexier bed? lol

Currently I sleep on a Certa box-spring bed topped with memory foam which works fine, but I actually prefer sleeping on the floor on a Futon. I have no problem sleeping the on the couch too. :D

cynsaligia
February 23rd, 2008, 10:46 AM
non-sleeping bed activities were [adversely] affected by wave motion and comparative lack of support/bounceback.


Non-sleeping bed activities? You mean like jumping up and down on the bed? :p

yes. the bag woulda broke. :cool:

Mike_Lowery
February 23rd, 2008, 11:21 AM
yes. the bag woulda broke. :cool:
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a90/thealmightymiranda/smileys/laugh.gif

Leo Lakio
February 23rd, 2008, 01:12 PM
Remember, we're in Hawaii where average high temperatures are in the 80's and 90's during the day and lows in the 60's and 70's at night.Yes --- and what again is the average human body temperature? The water needs to be at least in the upper 70s to keep from drawing too much heat away.
Then you have the issue of the quality of the water in it.Not sure I understand the "quality" factor - the water comes out of the tap, and we dump a bottle of conditioner in it once a year (which is when we also push out air bubbles). Pretty minimal maintenance. We find it incredibly comfortable, though everyone finds it a little weird for the first few nights. As for "non-sleep" activities ... well, we've never found that to be a problem. And there's no squeaky springs to disturb guests.

The biggest downside is that it's a real pain to assemble and disassemble when moving; I'm particularly happy that we've been in one place for 11 years.

cynsaligia
February 23rd, 2008, 01:22 PM
forgot to mention that the efftard, for some reason, refused to fill the bag fully, so that's prolly why there was lack of support/lack of bounceback and way too much unhelpful wave motion.

there are many reasons why one of the names i have for him is efftard. *shrug*

he had to empty the bag and stuff the frame with a regular mattress when he moved. lots of condos do not allow water beds.

Leo Lakio
February 23rd, 2008, 01:56 PM
forgot to mention that the efftard, for some reason, refused to fill the bag fully, so that's prolly why there was lack of support/lack of bounceback and way too much unhelpful wave motion.

there are many reasons why one of the names i have for him is efftard. *shrug*
Yeah, that would be a BIG factor. At least people like him do serve a purpose in life, e - as bad examples.

pzarquon
February 23rd, 2008, 02:25 PM
Wow. Deja vu.

Wait. Where were we? Oh yeah. Waterbeds.

When I was a kid, we visited a home with one. Without naming names, a hole was punched into it within an hour of its discovery. Don't think that family hosted a party for the neighborhood ever again.

Can you still buy waterbeds? I've seen them mentioned in rental contracts (alongside 20+ gallon fish tanks), but not in the wild for years.

Mike_Lowery
February 23rd, 2008, 02:51 PM
Wow. Deja vu.

Wait. Where were we? Oh yeah. Waterbeds.

When I was a kid, we visited a home with one. Without naming names, a hole was punched into it within an hour of its discovery. Don't think that family hosted a party for the neighborhood ever again.

Can you still buy waterbeds? I've seen them mentioned in rental contracts (alongside 20+ gallon fish tanks), but not in the wild for years.

haha, was this being discussed somewhere else online?

pzarquon
February 23rd, 2008, 03:11 PM
Not waterbeds, no, so I'd love to continue that thread...

Turns out there are assorted "waterbed" listings (http://honolulu.craigslist.org/search/sss?query=waterbed) on the Honolulu Craigslist site. But here's a blast from the past. A 1998 feature on waterbeds in the Star-Bulletin -- that's almost a decade ago.

Waterbeds became accepted by the mainstream and are rippling away in an estimated 35 million U.S. homes. Sales have steadied, after a high in the mid-'80s, at something like 2 million a year. They're standard equipment in rehabilitation centers and burn units, and also in the rear cabs of long-haul trucks, because, no matter what angle the truck is parked, the bed is self-leveling, thanks to gravity." The new waterbeds have headboards and adjustable surface tension, water temperature and wave action. They're also likely to come in a modular design called "tubes," in which long narrow mini-waterbeds are laid side by side like squeezes of toothpaste. Add a few more tubes, and your single bed becomes a queen or a king-size.

Leo Lakio
February 23rd, 2008, 04:03 PM
A 1998 feature on waterbeds in the Star-Bulletin
The new waterbeds have headboardsThat was a "new" feature in 1998? Hardly. Both of mine had/have headboards (since the late 1970s).

Creative-1
February 23rd, 2008, 05:31 PM
I've slept on a water bed since I moved out of the dorms at college.

It is soooooooo comfortable. I love it.

joshuatree
February 23rd, 2008, 05:54 PM
yes. the bag woulda broke. :cool:

You know I was just messing around. :D

cynsaligia
February 23rd, 2008, 07:06 PM
You know I was just messing around. :D

of course! :D

Karen
February 24th, 2008, 11:26 AM
Yes, I actually still own a waterbed. No, not the ones with a huge bladder,though I do miss the california King Sized one we bought at Sears in the eighties.

We were a family in the San Jose, CA area of which all four of us slept on waterbeds, each young daughter on their own twin sized in their own rooms, and hubby and I on our king sized one. We got rid of the big bladder when we bought for the girls and what we got them was not one, big bladder but the
"Somma" brand water beds with several tubes of water in them, each individually sealed so that if one did get a leak there was no flood of water...just a very slow drip which first went into a very well-made vinyl holding area, and these things were "pillow-topped" long before other mattress companies caught on.

Our younger daughter that is now 20 never knew any bed but water because her crib mattress was also water. It remains the best sleep I've ever had, and yet we did hate the water problem once every, oh....3 or so years, so....

we slowly replaced all but one bed in the house with new, standard type pillow top mattresses, but are hanging onto one waterbed. I'm even considering.....going back to Somma someday. I'm in my fifties, now. Why not treat myself to the best bed in the world and just make sure that like.....everytime we change all of the smoke detector batteries we do a check on the waterbed tubes? something like that.

Waterbed sleep spoils you so much so that a five star hotel can find me lieing awake for two hours in trying to get to sleep. This is why we've added things like the memory foams to the top of our supposedly dreamy, new pillow-top mattresses. :eek::D:D

SusieMisajon
February 24th, 2008, 05:01 PM
This is funny...we've had a waterbed store recently open in a neighboring village (France being decades behind), and every time I pass it, I think of 404 Piikoi.

sophielynette
February 24th, 2008, 08:12 PM
Up through high school my parents had a waterbed, and as a child I always loved to lay in it. I'd sneak into the bedroom when my parents weren't home just to sleep on the bed. It was sooo cool during hot summers when we didn't have air conditioning, and to be honest, I don't think theirs was heated, but I don't remember it really being cold in the winter (and this was Ohio, so we got our cold winters).

I remember one time, my parents and I switched bedrooms, and apparently the dog didn't get the memo. She came flying into the bedroom to jump onto what she thought was my bed, only to land on this bouncy wavy water balloon -- I'm surprised her claws didn't puncture the lining. It was a funny sight.

Jim75
March 3rd, 2008, 03:18 PM
I had a waterbed back in the cryptozoic era. It was nice and warm during cold weather.