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  • Spin analysis

    So this Canadian researcher has come up with a computer algorithm to analyze politicians' speeches and rate them for truthfulness. It's based on a model by a Texas psychology professor, who also offers an online tool where you can enter a text sample and get it analyzed.

    I wonder how our local politicians' speeches would be rated. Does anybody care to find some texts and give it a try?

  • #2
    Re: Spin analysis

    Just to test it out, I submitted a snippet of the President's latest speech about Iraq into the analyzer. This is what it reported back (the first number indicates the President's score, the second from personal writing samples, the third from formal text writing:

    LIWC Results
    Details of Writer: 59 year old Male
    Date/Time: 20 January 2006, 12:09 pm

    LIWC dimension Your data Personal texts Formal texts
    Self-references (I, me, my) 4.96, 11.4, 4.2
    Social words 9.44, 9.5, 8.0
    Positive emotions 2.43, 2.7, 2.6
    Negative emotions 5.84, 2.6, 1.6
    Overall cognitive words 6.42, 7.8 ,5.4
    Articles (a, an, the) 8.17, 5.0, 7.2
    Big words (> 6 letters) 22.08 ,13.1, 19.6

    The text you submitted was 1028 words in length. Generally, the more words in a text, the better. Ideally, it is best if you have at least 100 words to analyze. In the table, the average word usage of highly personal texts (e.g., where people write about emotional experiences) and more formal texts (e.g., descriptions of objects or events) are presented. The numbers refer to the percentage of total words that were submitted. So, if the table reports a 11.4 for self-references, that means that 11.4% of the words in the text were self-references. In the space below, we briefly describe each of the LIWC categories:

    Self-references: People who use a high rate of self-references tend to be more insecure, nervous, and possibly depressed. They also tend to be more honest.

    Social words: Social words are words that make reference to other people (e.g., they, she, us, talk, friends). Generally, people who use a high number of social words are more outgoing and more socially connected with others.

    Positive emotion words: The more that people use positive emotion words (e.g. happy, love, good), the more optimistic they tend to be. If you feel good about yourself, your more likely to see the world in a positive way.

    Negative emotion words: Use of negative emotion words (e.g., sad, kill, afraid) is weakly linked to people's ratings of anxiety. People who have had a bad day are more likely to see the world through negatively-tinted glasses.

    Overall cognitive words: These are words that reflect how much people are actively thinking about their writing topic. Examples include: thinking, wonder, because, knowledge.

    Articles: The three article words - a, an, and the - account for a large percentage of the words we use. People who use articles at a high rate tend to be more concrete and impersonal in their thinking.

    Big words (words with more than 6 letters): Use of big words is weakly related to higher grades and standardized test scores. People who use a high rate of big words also tend to be less emotional and oftentimes psychologically distant or detached.

    I'll have to try this on some of Linda Lingle and Ed Case's speeches (if I can find the text).

    Miulang
    "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Spin analysis

      Here's an analysis of Linda Lingle's 2004 State of the State Address. I guess she (or her speechwriter) isn't the warm and fuzzy type (she used more big words than the President did!)

      LIWC Results
      Details of Writer: 58 year old Female
      Date/Time: 20 January 2006, 1:05 pm

      LIWC dimension Your data Personal texts Formal texts
      Self-references (I, me, my) 4.67, 11.4 ,4.2
      Social words 7.80, 9.5, 8.0
      Positive emotions 2.63, 2.7, 2.6
      Negative emotions 1.00, 2.6, 1.6
      Overall cognitive words 4.96, 7.8, 5.4
      Articles (a, an, the) 7.19, 5.0, 7.2
      Big words (> 6 letters) 28.44, 13.1, 19.6

      The text you submitted was 6998 words in length. Generally, the more words in a text, the better. Ideally, it is best if you have at least 100 words to analyze. In the table, the average word usage of highly personal texts (e.g., where people write about emotional experiences) and more formal texts (e.g., descriptions of objects or events) are presented. The numbers refer to the percentage of total words that were submitted. So, if the table reports a 11.4 for self-references, that means that 11.4% of the words in the text were self-references. In the space below, we briefly describe each of the LIWC categories:

      Self-references: People who use a high rate of self-references tend to be more insecure, nervous, and possibly depressed. They also tend to be more honest.

      Social words: Social words are words that make reference to other people (e.g., they, she, us, talk, friends). Generally, people who use a high number of social words are more outgoing and more socially connected with others.

      Positive emotion words: The more that people use positive emotion words (e.g. happy, love, good), the more optimistic they tend to be. If you feel good about yourself, your more likely to see the world in a positive way.

      Negative emotion words: Use of negative emotion words (e.g., sad, kill, afraid) is weakly linked to people's ratings of anxiety. People who have had a bad day are more likely to see the world through negatively-tinted glasses.

      Overall cognitive words: These are words that reflect how much people are actively thinking about their writing topic. Examples include: thinking, wonder, because, knowledge.

      Articles: The three article words - a, an, and the - account for a large percentage of the words we use. People who use articles at a high rate tend to be more concrete and impersonal in their thinking.

      Big words (words with more than 6 letters): Use of big words is weakly related to higher grades and standardized test scores. People who use a high rate of big words also tend to be less emotional and oftentimes psychologically distant or detached.
      "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Spin analysis

        Here's an analysis of Ed Case's speech in Congress on behalf of the bill to establish the NWHI National Marine Refuge last year. According to the parser, he's even more distant than Lingle OR Pres. Bush (more big words). Must be his Punahou education...

        Details of Writer: 51 year old Male
        Date/Time: 21 January 2006, 1:17 pm

        LIWC dimension Your data Personal texts Formal texts
        Self-references (I, me, my) 2.55, 11.4, 4.2
        Social words 3.01, 9.5, 8.0
        Positive emotions 1.30, 2.7, 2.6
        Negative emotions 0.32, 2.6, 1.6
        Overall cognitive words 3.57, 7.8, 5.4
        Articles (a, an, the) 8.67, 5.0, 7.2
        Big words (> 6 letters) 31.59, 13.1, 19.6

        The text you submitted was 2156 words in length. Generally, the more words in a text, the better. Ideally, it is best if you have at least 100 words to analyze. In the table, the average word usage of highly personal texts (e.g., where people write about emotional experiences) and more formal texts (e.g., descriptions of objects or events) are presented. The numbers refer to the percentage of total words that were submitted. So, if the table reports a 11.4 for self-references, that means that 11.4% of the words in the text were self-references. In the space below, we briefly describe each of the LIWC categories:

        Self-references: People who use a high rate of self-references tend to be more insecure, nervous, and possibly depressed. They also tend to be more honest.

        Social words: Social words are words that make reference to other people (e.g., they, she, us, talk, friends). Generally, people who use a high number of social words are more outgoing and more socially connected with others.

        Positive emotion words: The more that people use positive emotion words (e.g. happy, love, good), the more optimistic they tend to be. If you feel good about yourself, your more likely to see the world in a positive way.

        Negative emotion words: Use of negative emotion words (e.g., sad, kill, afraid) is weakly linked to people's ratings of anxiety. People who have had a bad day are more likely to see the world through negatively-tinted glasses.

        Overall cognitive words: These are words that reflect how much people are actively thinking about their writing topic. Examples include: thinking, wonder, because, knowledge.

        Articles: The three article words - a, an, and the - account for a large percentage of the words we use. People who use articles at a high rate tend to be more concrete and impersonal in their thinking.

        Big words (words with more than 6 letters): Use of big words is weakly related to higher grades and standardized test scores. People who use a high rate of big words also tend to be less emotional and oftentimes psychologically distant or detached.
        "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Spin analysis

          And here's an analysis of Daniel Akaka, based on a speech before the House last year:

          Details of Writer: 81 year old Male
          Date/Time: 21 January 2006, 1:24 pm

          LIWC dimension Your data Personal texts Formal texts
          Self-references (I, me, my) 1.13, 11.4, 4.2
          Social words 2.95, 9.5, 8.0
          Positive emotions 2.26, 2.7, 2.6
          Negative emotions 0.61, 2.6, 1.6
          Overall cognitive words 3.21, 7.8, 5.4
          Articles (a, an, the) 9.73, 5.0, 7.2
          Big words (> 6 letters) 30.58, 13.1, 19.6

          The text you submitted was 1151 words in length. Generally, the more words in a text, the better. Ideally, it is best if you have at least 100 words to analyze. In the table, the average word usage of highly personal texts (e.g., where people write about emotional experiences) and more formal texts (e.g., descriptions of objects or events) are presented. The numbers refer to the percentage of total words that were submitted. So, if the table reports a 11.4 for self-references, that means that 11.4% of the words in the text were self-references. In the space below, we briefly describe each of the LIWC categories:

          Self-references: People who use a high rate of self-references tend to be more insecure, nervous, and possibly depressed. They also tend to be more honest.

          Social words: Social words are words that make reference to other people (e.g., they, she, us, talk, friends). Generally, people who use a high number of social words are more outgoing and more socially connected with others.

          Positive emotion words: The more that people use positive emotion words (e.g. happy, love, good), the more optimistic they tend to be. If you feel good about yourself, your more likely to see the world in a positive way.

          Negative emotion words: Use of negative emotion words (e.g., sad, kill, afraid) is weakly linked to people's ratings of anxiety. People who have had a bad day are more likely to see the world through negatively-tinted glasses.

          Overall cognitive words: These are words that reflect how much people are actively thinking about their writing topic. Examples include: thinking, wonder, because, knowledge.

          Articles: The three article words - a, an, and the - account for a large percentage of the words we use. People who use articles at a high rate tend to be more concrete and impersonal in their thinking.

          Big words (words with more than 6 letters): Use of big words is weakly related to higher grades and standardized test scores. People who use a high rate of big words also tend to be less emotional and oftentimes psychologically distant or detached.
          "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Spin analysis

            Tita Miulang, Plz make mine? Plz. hahahahah

            Lynn
            Be AKAMAI ~ KOKUA Hawai`i!
            Philippians 4:13 --- I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Spin analysis

              Hui Tita:
              Your wish is my command! Here yours...maybe you BETTA run for office! I wen analyze da blog entry you made about your kids and being proud of their service. And they say you da pupule one! bahahahahaha!

              Details of Writer: 50 year old Female
              Date/Time: 21 January 2006, 2:01 pm

              LIWC dimension Your data Personal texts Formal texts
              Self-references (I, me, my) 8.63, 11.4, 4.2
              Social words 17.63, 9.5, 8.0
              Positive emotions 2.52, 2.7, 2.6
              Negative emotions 0.00, 2.6, 1.6
              Overall cognitive words 3.24, 7.8, 5.4
              Articles (a, an, the) 5.76, 5.0, 7.2
              Big words (> 6 letters) 19.06, 13.1, 19.6

              The text you submitted was 278 words in length. Generally, the more words in a text, the better. Ideally, it is best if you have at least 100 words to analyze. In the table, the average word usage of highly personal texts (e.g., where people write about emotional experiences) and more formal texts (e.g., descriptions of objects or events) are presented. The numbers refer to the percentage of total words that were submitted. So, if the table reports a 11.4 for self-references, that means that 11.4% of the words in the text were self-references. In the space below, we briefly describe each of the LIWC categories:

              Self-references: People who use a high rate of self-references tend to be more insecure, nervous, and possibly depressed. They also tend to be more honest.

              Social words: Social words are words that make reference to other people (e.g., they, she, us, talk, friends). Generally, people who use a high number of social words are more outgoing and more socially connected with others.

              Positive emotion words: The more that people use positive emotion words (e.g. happy, love, good), the more optimistic they tend to be. If you feel good about yourself, your more likely to see the world in a positive way.

              Negative emotion words: Use of negative emotion words (e.g., sad, kill, afraid) is weakly linked to people's ratings of anxiety. People who have had a bad day are more likely to see the world through negatively-tinted glasses.

              Overall cognitive words: These are words that reflect how much people are actively thinking about their writing topic. Examples include: thinking, wonder, because, knowledge.

              Articles: The three article words - a, an, and the - account for a large percentage of the words we use. People who use articles at a high rate tend to be more concrete and impersonal in their thinking.

              Big words (words with more than 6 letters): Use of big words is weakly related to higher grades and standardized test scores. People who use a high rate of big words also tend to be less emotional and oftentimes psychologically distant or detached.
              Last edited by Miulang; January 21, 2006, 10:05 AM.
              "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Spin analysis

                Originally posted by Miulang
                Hui Tita:
                Your wish is my command! Here yours...maybe you BETTA run for office! I wen analyze da blog entry you made about your kids and being proud of their service. And they say you da pupule one! bahahahahaha!

                Details of Writer: 50 year old Female
                Date/Time: 21 January 2006, 2:01 pm

                LIWC dimension Your data Personal texts Formal texts
                Self-references (I, me, my) 8.63, 11.4, 4.2
                Social words 17.63, 9.5, 8.0
                Positive emotions 2.52, 2.7, 2.6
                Negative emotions 0.00, 2.6, 1.6
                Overall cognitive words 3.24, 7.8, 5.4
                Articles (a, an, the) 5.76, 5.0, 7.2
                Big words (> 6 letters) 19.06, 13.1, 19.6

                Big words (words with more than 6 letters): Use of big words is weakly related to higher grades and standardized test scores. People who use a high rate of big words also tend to be less emotional and oftentimes psychologically distant or detached.
                Tita Miulang, I have the lowest score for "Big Words" ~ yep, I betta tink about running again! HAHAAHAHAHAHA!

                Mahalo,

                Auntie PUPULE
                Be AKAMAI ~ KOKUA Hawai`i!
                Philippians 4:13 --- I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Spin analysis

                  I analyzed the last entry I made in the thread about Maui, and this is what I got. Maybe you should run for Governor and I run for Lt. Governor! BAHAHAHAHA!

                  LIWC dimension Your data Personal texts Formal texts
                  Self-references (I, me, my) 1.36, 11.4, 4.2
                  Social words 5.72, 9.5, 8.0
                  Positive emotions 1.36, 2.7, 2.6
                  Negative emotions 1.09, 2.6, 1.6
                  Overall cognitive words 5.72, 7.8 ,5.4
                  Articles (a, an, the) 9.54, 5.0, 7.2
                  Big words (> 6 letters) 20.71, 13.1, 19.6
                  "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Spin analysis

                    You serious? I'm game! Let's do it! Let me know. Dey no have nobody yet that can give Lingle a run for the Governorship!

                    No need millions. No need Big Machines backing up. All we need is to be ourselves, be honest, tell what we plan to achieve and give'um!

                    Lynn

                    P.S. Eh, you no run. You live Seattle! Ayah! Cancelled.
                    Last edited by 1stwahine; January 21, 2006, 11:20 AM.
                    Be AKAMAI ~ KOKUA Hawai`i!
                    Philippians 4:13 --- I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Spin analysis

                      Miulang you should try Larry Price and see if da bugga going crash da program. He uses an incredable amount of hyperbolic words intermixed with high-context speech it drive the listeners nuts. In other words, big words lots of talk to get the point across.

                      Here's an example of hyperbolic-high context talk: The probability that you will not exercise sound judgement when operating a vehicle not of your own and will more than likely result in a negative impact in your ability to drive beyond this date and result in financial distress for me as your parent is high in nature concluding that the car is not available for your use tonight.

                      Here's an example of non-hyperbolic-low context talk: NO!
                      Life is what you make of it...so please read the instructions carefully.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Spin analysis

                        Here's a parse of Gov. Lingle's 2006 State of the State address. My what a difference 2 years doesn't make!

                        Details of Writer: 51 year old Female
                        Date/Time: 24 January 2006, 5:35 pm

                        LIWC dimension Your data Personal texts Formal texts
                        Self-references (I, me, my) 5.12, 11.4, 4.2
                        Social words 7.40, 9.5, 8.0
                        Positive emotions 2.81, 2.7, 2.6
                        Negative emotions 1.03, 2.6, 1.6
                        Overall cognitive words 4.23, 7.8, 5.4
                        Articles (a, an, the) 7.81, 5.0, 7.2
                        Big words (> 6 letters) 24.89, 13.1, 19.6
                        "Americans believe in three freedoms. Freedom of speech; freedom of religion; and the freedom to deny the other two to folks they don`t like.” --Mark Twain

                        Comment

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