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Ethnic politics?

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  • Re: The Congressional Follies

    For someone who feels he wouldn’t deserve a place in a sovereign nation of his race based on blood quantum, you’re pretty bold in your exclusivity, kamuela. So much hate. I know if I ever want to be made to feel uncomfortable for being a plantation Asian, all I need do is read one of 90% of your posts.

    It does help me understand why so many native Hawaiians have reached out to the Republican party. From Whitney Anderson to Duke Aiona to Quentin Kawananakoa, it obviously has reached out to Hawaiians as well.

    We can’t be so fixated on our desire to preserve the rights of ordinary Americans.

    — U.S. President Bill Clinton
    USA TODAY, page 2A
    11 March 1993

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    • Re: The Congressional Follies

      tunnl vision gets boring at some points in life
      Last edited by damontucker; October 14, 2006, 02:00 AM. Reason: TuNnL knows he burning his own bridges... i dunno why he choose to do so.

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      • Re: The Congressional Follies

        Originally posted by manoasurfer123 View Post
        tunnl vision gets boring at some points in life
        When you don't understand it...

        Are you just trying to win the Most Posts award or something?

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        • Re: The Congressional Follies

          Originally posted by dick View Post
          Are you just trying to win the Most Posts award or something?
          There are a couple of people on HT that would be interested in that title.

          I think he's just trying really hard to prove how much of a donkey he is.

          Not like it takes much to see that.

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          • Re: Ethnic politics?

            Originally posted by John Maple View Post
            That's true only if Hawai'i elected senators with a district-by-district electoral college. And I never said Case was banking on only Haoles. But he doesn't need the AJAs to win. They are a slowly dwindling, aging population with nowhere near the power they exercised in the '60s, '70s, and '80s.

            Voting Age Population (2000)

            To determine voting age population in 2006, I counted everyone in or older than the 10 to 14 years of age category in 2000. Slight bias to younger populations, but I think the numbers still make the point:

            Haoles: 401,682
            Japanese: 259,931
            Filipino: 223,956
            Native Hawaiians: 188,313
            Chinese: 139,344
            Korean: 31,446

            http://www.hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/cen...whitestate.pdf
            http://www.hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/cen...e/xjpstate.pdf
            http://www.hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/cen...ipinostate.pdf
            http://www.hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/cen...inesestate.pdf
            http://www.hawaii.gov/dbedt/info/cen...oreanstate.pdf

            Haoles have the Japanese outgunned by nearly 2 to 1. Even if you throw in the Chinese and the Koreans (many of whom are small-business owners that could conceivably vote Republican or Republicrat) on the basis of some pan-Asian argument, they only slightly beat out the Haoles (by 3.5%). The Filipino vote could have gone either way; my guess is that, at the start of the campaign at least, they were split with a slight advantage to Akaka. This isn't to say that AJAs aren't an important constituency--they have good turnout, good funding, good community networking, etc. But I think Case knows that Hawai'i has changed since the Lingle election (where an AJA lost to a Jewish Republican in a statewide race).

            Furthermore, I'm not sure the AJAs are as homogenous as you make it seem. Case started his political career in an AJA district; I think he's aware that class can be just as determinative as race in the voting booth.

            Not to put too fine a point, but doesn't the census count military service members and their depandant as part of the count? I am sure that is the case.

            If so there are a lot of those people who do not vote in our elections.

            That said, there is no current research that shows percentage of voter registration and voter participation by race. But conventional wisdom holds (correctly or not) Japanese voters have very high registration and participation.

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            • Re: Hirono vs. Hogue

              Hawaii is still the same. No change at all. Elections predictable based upon ethnic voting. All debate was for entertainment value only. Everybody get back to what you were doing. Pay your 2 to 4% increase in GE taxes starting January 1, 2007. Pay your recycling tax. Pay your increased property taxes and don't complain.

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              • Re: Ethnic politics?

                So where were the AJA votes for Iwase? I would think that most of the Asian Plantation generation are gone. Now if someone could get the young ones interested in voting and making some little impact on who calls the shots that would be great.

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                • Re: Ethnic politics?

                  The latest podcast from Hawaii Political Watch (which, you may recall, boldly predicted an Iwase upset) took a pretty good look at the vote results, including exit-poll data, and examined some of the surprises of the 2006 Hawaii General Election... including the point D'Alani makes that again proves the "ethnic voting" angle may be a strong indicator, but by no means a rule. A pretty good listen independent of the demographic debate.

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                  • Re: Ethnic politics?

                    not a whole lot to contribute here but I wanted to say that John Maple's coherent and logical thought process are insightful and make for interesting reading.

                    look forward to hearing your opinions on other local political issues.

                    and angryhawaiian seems to dislike AJA's for some reason. anyone care to fill me in as I'm a fairly recent member.

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                    • Re: Ethnic politics?

                      I'm just thankful that Democrats have maintained their grip on power in Hawaii. After all, the last 50 years has been such a raging success in Hawaii, politically speaking.

                      FutureNewsNetwork.com
                      Energy answers are already here.

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